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Hydrogen Sulfide

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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2005
As soon as she gets a whiff of the foul fumes, Stacy-Jo Krasa opens the windows, grabs her infant son and leaves her home in an upscale Sykesville subdivision. It might be hours before the air is cleared of the smell of sewer gas and they can return home after spending the day with family members. Only the hottest weather will entice her to shut up the house and turn on the air conditioning. Hot, humid days usually bring on the smell, she said. The gas - also known as hydrogen sulfide - "wafts up the stairs from the basement and often fills the powder room," Krasa said.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Anne Arundel County fire officials said Wednesday that a hazardous chemical incident that forced about 20 people from their Glen Burnie apartment complex Tuesday night was created by a neighbor who took his own life. Firefighters were called to the Burwood Gardens Apartments on Shelly Road at 4 p.m. Tuesday to check out a report of an odor of gas. Firefighters determined the smell was sulfur, not gas, and forced their way into a first-floor apartment, officials said. There, they found a note on a bathroom door warning that a hazmat suit would be required to enter.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Anne Arundel County fire officials said Wednesday that a hazardous chemical incident that forced about 20 people from their Glen Burnie apartment complex Tuesday night was created by a neighbor who took his own life. Firefighters were called to the Burwood Gardens Apartments on Shelly Road at 4 p.m. Tuesday to check out a report of an odor of gas. Firefighters determined the smell was sulfur, not gas, and forced their way into a first-floor apartment, officials said. There, they found a note on a bathroom door warning that a hazmat suit would be required to enter.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
In Frank Marion's Millersville home, ornate mirrors hang on walls painted rich shades of gold. Pillows are arranged just so on the leather sofa. And in nearly every corner, a flickering candle emits a soft perfume. That's the only way to mask the smell from the dump, Marion said. Since early summer, Marion and his neighbors say that they have noticed the air filling with the pungent scent of rotten eggs nearly every evening around supper time. They blame the foul smell on the nearby Millersville landfill.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
A tentative ruling by a Texas environmental commission would force Crown Central Petroleum Corp. to install a $300,000 device to help stop sulfur emissions at one of its refineries in Texas -- an order readily accepted by the company but deemed insufficient by environmental groups and health officials who say Crown should install a more effective unit that would cost more than $20 million.The move comes nearly a year after the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission fined Crown just over $1 million -- the largest air pollution fine ever issued by Texas -- for continued violations between 1993 and 1998 that included excessive hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide emissions at its Pasadena refinery.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | November 26, 1992
An accident that sent six Lehigh Portland Cement employees to Carroll County General Hospital on Nov. 5 was caused by trace amounts of sulfur compounds in a waste oil truck that was left open at the Union Bridge plant, company officials said yesterday.The company released that finding after conducting what officials described as a preliminary investigation into the accident.The report said the substances -- hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans -- are known to cause dizziness, breathing and eye problems and nausea, the symptoms shown by the employees that morning.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | July 16, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer had received enough letters and phone calls from residents to sniff out the problem for himself.Two weeks ago, the do-it-now governor drove to Rock Creek in Pasadena and took a whiff.Residents have complained for more than 12 years about the rotten-egg smell caused by hydrogen sulfide gas belched from the creek bottom. Some residents claim the foul-smelling gas has begun to make themill.Schaefer has been aware of the residents' concerns for some time, said Ray Feldmann, a spokesman for the governor.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | October 23, 2008
In Frank Marion's Millersville home, ornate mirrors hang on walls painted rich shades of gold. Pillows are arranged just so on the leather sofa. And in nearly every corner, a flickering candle emits a soft perfume. That's the only way to mask the smell from the dump, Marion said. Since early summer, Marion and his neighbors say that they have noticed the air filling with the pungent scent of rotten eggs nearly every evening around supper time. They blame the foul smell on the nearby Millersville landfill.
NEWS
January 5, 2004
TO DEVELOPERS, Ocean City smells like money. Tourists are lured by the scent of French fries and funnel cakes. But something altogether less pleasant is wafting through the air around the resort's booming mid-town -- and now it looks as if something is finally going to be done about it. Ocean City officials are looking to spend about $2.6 million next year to reduce the odors generated by the community's sewage treatment plant at 64th Street on the...
FEATURES
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,los angeles times | March 24, 1999
Brussels sprouts are never going to win any popularity contests. They're the weak member of the vegetable pack, the one everyone likes to pick on. Brussels sprouts are weird-looking, like miniature cabbages. Maybe that's why they're usually shoved away in some dark corner of the produce market. Unlike broccoli, which is also weird-looking but seems to be in your face every time you turn around, they'll never gain acceptance merely through familiarity.What's more, brussels sprouts are ugly and they smell bad.Well, that's not exactly accurate.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2005
As soon as she gets a whiff of the foul fumes, Stacy-Jo Krasa opens the windows, grabs her infant son and leaves her home in an upscale Sykesville subdivision. It might be hours before the air is cleared of the smell of sewer gas and they can return home after spending the day with family members. Only the hottest weather will entice her to shut up the house and turn on the air conditioning. Hot, humid days usually bring on the smell, she said. The gas - also known as hydrogen sulfide - "wafts up the stairs from the basement and often fills the powder room," Krasa said.
NEWS
January 5, 2004
TO DEVELOPERS, Ocean City smells like money. Tourists are lured by the scent of French fries and funnel cakes. But something altogether less pleasant is wafting through the air around the resort's booming mid-town -- and now it looks as if something is finally going to be done about it. Ocean City officials are looking to spend about $2.6 million next year to reduce the odors generated by the community's sewage treatment plant at 64th Street on the...
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
A tentative ruling by a Texas environmental commission would force Crown Central Petroleum Corp. to install a $300,000 device to help stop sulfur emissions at one of its refineries in Texas -- an order readily accepted by the company but deemed insufficient by environmental groups and health officials who say Crown should install a more effective unit that would cost more than $20 million.The move comes nearly a year after the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission fined Crown just over $1 million -- the largest air pollution fine ever issued by Texas -- for continued violations between 1993 and 1998 that included excessive hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide emissions at its Pasadena refinery.
FEATURES
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,los angeles times | March 24, 1999
Brussels sprouts are never going to win any popularity contests. They're the weak member of the vegetable pack, the one everyone likes to pick on. Brussels sprouts are weird-looking, like miniature cabbages. Maybe that's why they're usually shoved away in some dark corner of the produce market. Unlike broccoli, which is also weird-looking but seems to be in your face every time you turn around, they'll never gain acceptance merely through familiarity.What's more, brussels sprouts are ugly and they smell bad.Well, that's not exactly accurate.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | November 26, 1992
An accident that sent six Lehigh Portland Cement employees to Carroll County General Hospital on Nov. 5 was caused by trace amounts of sulfur compounds in a waste oil truck that was left open at the Union Bridge plant, company officials said yesterday.The company released that finding after conducting what officials described as a preliminary investigation into the accident.The report said the substances -- hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans -- are known to cause dizziness, breathing and eye problems and nausea, the symptoms shown by the employees that morning.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | July 16, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer had received enough letters and phone calls from residents to sniff out the problem for himself.Two weeks ago, the do-it-now governor drove to Rock Creek in Pasadena and took a whiff.Residents have complained for more than 12 years about the rotten-egg smell caused by hydrogen sulfide gas belched from the creek bottom. Some residents claim the foul-smelling gas has begun to make themill.Schaefer has been aware of the residents' concerns for some time, said Ray Feldmann, a spokesman for the governor.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2010
Thousands of U.S. homes tainted by Chinese drywall should be completely gutted, according to new guidelines released Friday by the Consumer Product Safety Commission. The guidelines say electrical wiring, outlets, circuit breakers, fire alarm systems, carbon monoxide alarms, fire sprinklers, gas pipes and drywall need to be removed. About 3,000 homeowners have reported problems with the Chinese-made drywall. The agency continues to investigate possible health effects, but preliminary studies have found a possible link between throat, nose and lung irritation and high levels of hydrogen sulfide gas emitted from the wallboard, coupled with formaldehyde, commonly found in new houses.
NEWS
November 26, 1992
Waste sulfur blamed for Lehigh accidentAn accident that sent six Lehigh Portland Cement employees the hospital in Carroll County Nov. 5 was caused by trace amounts of sulfur compounds in a waste oil truck that was left open at the plant, company officials said yesterday.Lehigh released its finding after conducting what officials described as a preliminary investigation of the accident. The company said the waste oil contained hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans, which are known to cause the dizziness, breathing and eye problems and nausea symptoms shown by the employees.
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