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By New York Times News Service | May 26, 1994
BEIJING -- China is going forward with plans to detonate a hydrogen bomb at its underground test range at Lop Nor, Western diplomats say, and the test could come within days of President Clinton's expected decision to renew China's favorable trade access to the U.S. market.Communist Party leaders appear to be delaying the explosion for political, not technical reasons. Western diplomats believe that it could come at any time.The military purpose for this test is not regarded as threatening by Western governments, which see it as a predictable upgrade of China's relatively small strategic nuclear force.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 24, 2008
Lemuel O. Warfield, a former naval fighter pilot and reservist who later became an oil company manager, died Nov. 15 at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center from complications of a fall he suffered at his Annapolis home. He was 80. Mr. Warfield was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1945, he enlisted in the Navy. He was designated a naval aviator in 1948 and commissioned an ensign. He was assigned to Fighting Squadron 23 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea in the Pacific Theater.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 24, 2008
Lemuel O. Warfield, a former naval fighter pilot and reservist who later became an oil company manager, died Nov. 15 at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center from complications of a fall he suffered at his Annapolis home. He was 80. Mr. Warfield was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1945, he enlisted in the Navy. He was designated a naval aviator in 1948 and commissioned an ensign. He was assigned to Fighting Squadron 23 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea in the Pacific Theater.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
State troopers searched the home of a Westminster High School student late Friday, looking for evidence that he may have been planning to carry out a string of bomb-related threats they say he had made against his classmates. Police said yesterday that the search turned up no explosives-making materials, but police did confiscate his father's six rifles, three handguns and two BB guns as a precaution. The 14-year-old boy, whose name has not been released, was arrested at the school about noon Friday.
NEWS
March 10, 1997
J. Carson Mark,83, who headed the theoretical division at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory when the hydrogen bomb was developed, died March 2 in Los Alamos, N.M., after a fall.All inventions during the Manhattan Project to build an atomic bomb at Los Alamos were channeled through Mr. Mark, who brought hydrogen bomb plans by feuding physicists Stanislaw Ulam and Dr. Edward Teller together.Ruth Clark,80, a pollster whose landmark newspaper study encouraged editors to give readers news they could use, died of lung cancer Feb. 20 in New York.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 28, 1992
The federal government, which battled for decades to keep the workings of the hydrogen bomb secret, is beginning to declassify some of the most sensitive aspects of its design and to let American scientists publish them in scientific literature.The reason for this reversal is not internal policy considerations, the end of the cold war or the collapse of the Soviet Union as a military threat. Rather it is foreign competition.Scientists in Japan, Germany, Spain and Italy, striving to harness the power of tiny, repeated hydrogen-bomb-like blasts for the generation of electrical energy, have published the "secrets" for years.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
State troopers searched the home of a Westminster High School student late Friday, looking for evidence that he may have been planning to carry out a string of bomb-related threats they say he had made against his classmates. Police said yesterday that the search turned up no explosives-making materials, but police did confiscate his father's six rifles, three handguns and two BB guns as a precaution. The 14-year-old boy, whose name has not been released, was arrested at the school about noon Friday.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
Maryland State Police troopers searched the home of a Westminster High School student late Friday, looking for evidence that he might have been planning to carry out a string of bomb-related threats they say he had made against his classmates. Police said yesterday that the search turned up no explosive-making materials, but police did confiscate his father's six rifles, three handguns and two BB guns as a precaution. The 14-year-old boy, whose name has not been released, was arrested at the school about noon Friday.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
Maryland State Police troopers searched the home of a Westminster High School student late Friday, looking for evidence that he might have been planning to carry out a string of bomb-related threats they say he had made against his classmates. Police said yesterday that the search turned up no explosive-making materials, but police did confiscate his father's six rifles, three handguns and two BB guns as a precaution. The 14-year-old boy, whose name has not been released, was arrested at the school about noon Friday.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield | August 25, 1991
So it's back to school on Tuesday. Every year at this time, people ask me if I'm really ready to return. Then they step back to observe the havoc they've wreaked.Not this year, baby.Maybe I could use some extra time to decompress after a tough week spent lying on the sands of Virginia Beach, but I'm not complaining.This year, I'm going to bound through the doors of Annapolis High School with a spring in my step and a song in my heart, secure in the knowledge that things could be a whole helluva lot worse:* I could be the next friend of the governor's to need emergency medical assistance.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
Maryland State Police troopers searched the home of a Westminster High School student late Friday, looking for evidence that he might have been planning to carry out a string of bomb-related threats they say he had made against his classmates. Police said yesterday that the search turned up no explosive-making materials, but police did confiscate his father's six rifles, three handguns and two BB guns as a precaution. The 14-year-old boy, whose name has not been released, was arrested at the school about noon Friday.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
Maryland State Police troopers searched the home of a Westminster High School student late Friday, looking for evidence that he might have been planning to carry out a string of bomb-related threats they say he had made against his classmates. Police said yesterday that the search turned up no explosive-making materials, but police did confiscate his father's six rifles, three handguns and two BB guns as a precaution. The 14-year-old boy, whose name has not been released, was arrested at the school about noon Friday.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 2003
PHILADELPHIA - With a blast of X-rays compressing a capsule of hydrogen to conditions approaching those at the center of the sun, scientists from Sandia National Laboratories reported yesterday that they had achieved thermonuclear fusion, in essence detonating a tiny hydrogen bomb. Such controlled explosions would not be large enough to be dangerous and might offer an alternative way of generating electricity by harnessing fusion, the process that powers the sun. Fusion combines hydrogen atoms into helium, producing bountiful energy as a byproduct.
NEWS
March 10, 1997
J. Carson Mark,83, who headed the theoretical division at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory when the hydrogen bomb was developed, died March 2 in Los Alamos, N.M., after a fall.All inventions during the Manhattan Project to build an atomic bomb at Los Alamos were channeled through Mr. Mark, who brought hydrogen bomb plans by feuding physicists Stanislaw Ulam and Dr. Edward Teller together.Ruth Clark,80, a pollster whose landmark newspaper study encouraged editors to give readers news they could use, died of lung cancer Feb. 20 in New York.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 6, 1995
Brothers and sisters, how can we in good conscience make Jack Kent Cooke put up his money for a football stadium in Landover? "My family and I are paying for this stadium lock, stock and barrel," says Mr. Cooke, owner of the Washington football team. One has to feel for the man.What is wrong with us? Have we, at long last, no sense of decency? How can Marylanders stand by and make the civic-minded Mr. Cooke (estimated net worth: $1.6 billion) pay $160 million for his own stadium when we're spending $200 million for one in Baltimore for Art Modell and the Browns?
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 1, 1995
NIZHNY NOVGOROD, Russia -- The four small rooms of the Andrei D. Sakharov Museum are silent on this cold, sunny afternoon, as if Russians have forgotten the man who changed their history.Dr. Sakharov was the gifted Soviet physicist who became a dissident and human rights activist only to be punished with internal exile. The father of the Soviet H-bomb, he was exiled in 1980 to this city, known in the Soviet era as Gorky, a place no foreigner was allowed to visit.Dr. Sakharov was sent here because he criticized the Soviet Union for embarking on its war in Afghanistan.
NEWS
October 20, 1991
Beneath ContemptEditor: I am outraged at the new furlough policy for some state employees. As a state employee myself, I do not object to losing several days' pay to help the economy as long as the state government first does its part.Did Governor Schaefer receive a $35,000 pay raise this year and did legislators also receive pay raises?If so, they are all beneath contempt. Let them refuse those raises and give up the perks associated with their offices before forcing other state employees to take days off without pay.I will cheerfully give up a few days' pay to help the economy once the legislators show willingness to tighten their own belts.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 1, 1995
NIZHNY NOVGOROD, Russia -- The four small rooms of the Andrei D. Sakharov Museum are silent on this cold, sunny afternoon, as if Russians have forgotten the man who changed their history.Dr. Sakharov was the gifted Soviet physicist who became a dissident and human rights activist only to be punished with internal exile. The father of the Soviet H-bomb, he was exiled in 1980 to this city, known in the Soviet era as Gorky, a place no foreigner was allowed to visit.Dr. Sakharov was sent here because he criticized the Soviet Union for embarking on its war in Afghanistan.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 26, 1994
BEIJING -- China is going forward with plans to detonate a hydrogen bomb at its underground test range at Lop Nor, Western diplomats say, and the test could come within days of President Clinton's expected decision to renew China's favorable trade access to the U.S. market.Communist Party leaders appear to be delaying the explosion for political, not technical reasons. Western diplomats believe that it could come at any time.The military purpose for this test is not regarded as threatening by Western governments, which see it as a predictable upgrade of China's relatively small strategic nuclear force.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 28, 1992
The federal government, which battled for decades to keep the workings of the hydrogen bomb secret, is beginning to declassify some of the most sensitive aspects of its design and to let American scientists publish them in scientific literature.The reason for this reversal is not internal policy considerations, the end of the cold war or the collapse of the Soviet Union as a military threat. Rather it is foreign competition.Scientists in Japan, Germany, Spain and Italy, striving to harness the power of tiny, repeated hydrogen-bomb-like blasts for the generation of electrical energy, have published the "secrets" for years.
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