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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 2003
PHILADELPHIA - With a blast of X-rays compressing a capsule of hydrogen to conditions approaching those at the center of the sun, scientists from Sandia National Laboratories reported yesterday that they had achieved thermonuclear fusion, in essence detonating a tiny hydrogen bomb. Such controlled explosions would not be large enough to be dangerous and might offer an alternative way of generating electricity by harnessing fusion, the process that powers the sun. Fusion combines hydrogen atoms into helium, producing bountiful energy as a byproduct.
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FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Aiming to boost the fledgling market for plug-in vehicles, Maryland and seven other states pledged Thursday to use their governments' tax and spending powers to get 3.3 million "zero-emission" cars, trucks and vans on the road in the next dozen years. Gov. Martin O'Malley and his counterparts in California, Connecticut, New York, Massachusetts, Oregon, Rhode Island and Vermont formally vowed to promote plug-in or hydrogen fuel cell vehicles in their states. They signed an agreement promising to take steps in their states to expand consumer demand for the vehicles, which despite rapidly rising sales remain a tiny portion of the cars and trucks sold in the United States.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham and Michael Pakenham,SUN BOOK EDITOR | May 12, 2002
There is almost magic eloquence in the practice and insights of science at its highest orders - which when transformed into the written word can produce splendid literature. A recent effort to do just that is Hydrogen: The Essential Element, by John S. Rigden (Oxford University Press, 320 pages, $28). For many reasons, this book grabbed me from the start and held my attention to its finish. Rigden is director of special projects at the American Institute of Physics, and author of Rabi: Scientist and Citizen.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Extracting hydrogen and oxygen from water and burning the gas in your vehicle engine to boost gas mileage and cut emissions? Crazy, many engineers and other experts say. But four Howard County highway workers say they've made devices to do just that and successfully used them on their own vehicles, and now they have the OK to test them on a couple of county vehicles. "If that's what it takes to get a net savings, why not?" County Executive Ken Ulman reasoned after visiting the county's Cooksville vehicle maintenance shop to see the devices and talk to the men who built them.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Extracting hydrogen and oxygen from water and burning the gas in your vehicle engine to boost gas mileage and cut emissions? Crazy, many engineers and other experts say. But four Howard County highway workers say they've made devices to do just that and successfully used them on their own vehicles, and now they have the OK to test them on a couple of county vehicles. "If that's what it takes to get a net savings, why not?" County Executive Ken Ulman reasoned after visiting the county's Cooksville vehicle maintenance shop to see the devices and talk to the men who built them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John O'Dell and John O'Dell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2003
The driver looks through a vast, sloped windshield that covers space usually taken up by an engine. There is no dashboard, instrument panel, steering wheel or foot pedals - just a set of adjustable footrests. All controls are electronic, so that the driver twists a pair of handles to go, moves them to turn and squeezes them to stop. This, though, is no Hollywood moviemaker's fantasy car. It is General Motors Corp.'s "Hy-Wire," a hydrogen-fueled, electricity-producing concept car that the company gave its debut in Sacramento, Calif.
NEWS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | April 29, 1997
Astronomers may have found some of the matter that has been missing from the universe, new research suggests.Scientists have long puzzled over why the amount of matter they can see -- in the form of luminous stars, galaxies and so forth -- doesn't seem to be enough to account for the huge gravitational attraction that keeps those galaxies from flying apart.Thus researchers believe that as much as 90 percent of the universe may be made of "dark matter" that nobody can see.The big mystery has been, what would dark matter be made of?
TOPIC
By Ernest F. Imhoff | March 5, 2000
IT HAS BEEN 63 years since Robert E. Rutan ran for his life from beneath the exploding German airship Hindenburg in Lakehurst, N.J., and 63 years since he was told to keep quiet about why he thought it blew up. At last, he is talking publicly. His theory blames a deadly mixture of gasoline vapors, stormy weather, engine backfire and the flammable hydrogen aboard the rigid airship. After the disaster, a U.S. inquiry suggested that a spark from static electricity ignited a leak of the rigid airships hydrogen, causing an explosion and a fire that destroyed the ship in 37 seconds.
NEWS
By ROBERT BURRUSS | October 5, 1994
Kensington. -- In the late 1970s I was a consultant to a construction company that was waterproofing the new Metro subway system in Washington. The sealant they had been using had been declared a carcinogen by the Environmental Protection Agency, and my task was to find a safe alternative that could be injected at high pressure into tiny cracks in the walls of the Metro stations.The substitute I found, polyacrylamide, was a gelling agent used mainly for consolidation of loose soil around oil wells.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 21, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Energy Department and an engineering firm plan to announce today that they have produced electricity from gasoline through a method that yields twice as much useful energy per gallon as a car engine does, and with pollution 90 percent lower.The development raises the prospect of an electric car, still quiet, swift and clean, but without the problem of heavy batteries that must be recharged often.Instead, such a car would be refilled with energy in minutes from the pump at the corner gasoline station and get twice the gas mileage of a comparable car with an internal combustion engine.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 24, 2008
Lemuel O. Warfield, a former naval fighter pilot and reservist who later became an oil company manager, died Nov. 15 at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center from complications of a fall he suffered at his Annapolis home. He was 80. Mr. Warfield was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1945, he enlisted in the Navy. He was designated a naval aviator in 1948 and commissioned an ensign. He was assigned to Fighting Squadron 23 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Coral Sea in the Pacific Theater.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2005
As soon as she gets a whiff of the foul fumes, Stacy-Jo Krasa opens the windows, grabs her infant son and leaves her home in an upscale Sykesville subdivision. It might be hours before the air is cleared of the smell of sewer gas and they can return home after spending the day with family members. Only the hottest weather will entice her to shut up the house and turn on the air conditioning. Hot, humid days usually bring on the smell, she said. The gas - also known as hydrogen sulfide - "wafts up the stairs from the basement and often fills the powder room," Krasa said.
NEWS
By Joseph J. Romm | May 2, 2005
AS GASOLINE prices surge to record highs, General Motors teeters on the verge of collapse with a credit rating one step above junk. This is hardly coincidence. GM has willfully ignored fundamental trends in technology and oil. To make matters worse, so has our government. U.S. security is threatened by rising dependence on oil and instability in the oil-rich Persian Gulf. Our automakers and government have a brief window to adopt an aggressive strategy to push fuel-efficient vehicles, especially hybrids, or we risk yielding our destiny to outside forces.
NEWS
May 11, 2004
SO, GASOLINE could be $3 a gallon by the end of the summer. Gak! It's almost enough to make you hope that President Bush really does have a secret deal with the Saudis to turn on the oil spigots right before the election, as Bob Woodward reports. Actually, it's not clear how much or how quickly it would help if OPEC boosted the supply of crude oil, since the pump price is also driven by a shortage of refineries in this country. Even so, it would be only a short-term fix. Good for Mr. Bush's re-election prospects, perhaps, but just a little kick of the can down the road to postpone facing up to the reality of cheap fuel.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | September 7, 2003
If you see the words "partially hydrogenated" on a food label, you should drop the item back on the shelf and push your shopping cart away as fast as your legs will carry you. At least that's what nutritionists and other health professionals are hoping you'll do until the FDA's new regulations on trans fatty acids take affect in 2006. That's a long time to wait for something so important to your health, say some experts. To put it simply, trans fat is bad for your heart. So, until manufacturers are required to put the trans fat content on nutrition labels, you're going to have to do a little detective work yourself.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 2003
PHILADELPHIA - With a blast of X-rays compressing a capsule of hydrogen to conditions approaching those at the center of the sun, scientists from Sandia National Laboratories reported yesterday that they had achieved thermonuclear fusion, in essence detonating a tiny hydrogen bomb. Such controlled explosions would not be large enough to be dangerous and might offer an alternative way of generating electricity by harnessing fusion, the process that powers the sun. Fusion combines hydrogen atoms into helium, producing bountiful energy as a byproduct.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 13, 2003
BOSTON - The other night there was a perfect clash of cultures at an intersection in Volant, Pa. An SUV collided with a horse-drawn Amish buggy. The score was SUV 1, Horse 0. The clash was no surprise to those of us who have more horsepower than our Amish brethren but less than a Hummer. SUVs have, after all, become the target of choice for those who have finally connected the dots between the cars we drive, the wars we fight and the globe we warm. In the past months, SUVs have been ticketed, picketed and spray-painted.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1995
PITTSBURGH -- Johns Hopkins University astronomers say they have detected and measured intergalactic helium believed to be left over from the birth of the universe.From that, they have figured out, for the first time, how much hydrogen existed along with the helium 10 billion years ago. That helps to confirm the Big Bang theory of the origin of the universe, and adds to the growing inventory of what is out there.There was so much of the two gases that the discovery multiplies the amount of matter now known to exist in the universe by a factor of 5 or 10, the astronomers said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 13, 2003
The Hubble Space Telescope has detected an extensive atmosphere of hydrogen enveloping and escaping from a newfound planet of a distant star, scientists reported yesterday. The discovery comes as no surprise, astronomers say, but it is important nonetheless as apparent confirmation that the extrasolar planets observed so far not only are much like the solar system's Jupiter in size but also are similarly huge gaseous bodies. In an announcement by the European Space Agency and NASA, a French-led research team said three separate observations by the Hubble telescope had revealed a hot and puffed-up hydrogen atmosphere surrounding a planet orbiting the star HD 209458, in the constellation Pegasus 150 light-years from Earth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John O'Dell and John O'Dell,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 2003
The driver looks through a vast, sloped windshield that covers space usually taken up by an engine. There is no dashboard, instrument panel, steering wheel or foot pedals - just a set of adjustable footrests. All controls are electronic, so that the driver twists a pair of handles to go, moves them to turn and squeezes them to stop. This, though, is no Hollywood moviemaker's fantasy car. It is General Motors Corp.'s "Hy-Wire," a hydrogen-fueled, electricity-producing concept car that the company gave its debut in Sacramento, Calif.
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