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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1997
An environmental coalition's report on air quality in heavily industrial southern Baltimore shows that eight pollutants were detected in elevated levels that indicate a need for further study to determine the risk to the public.The report, which was reviewed last night by the air committee of the Community Partnership for Environmental Protection at its Brooklyn office, deals with air quality in Cherry Hill, Brooklyn, Curtis Bay and Wagner's Point.The partnership, which was formed about a year ago, includes the federal Environmental Protection Agency, community activists and industry representatives.
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NEWS
September 6, 2011
HAGERSTOWN — Fire officials say one of two soda-bottle bombs placed in a hotel parking lot exploded, but did not cause any injuries or damage. It happened about 1:45 a.m. Monday at Spring Hill Suites hotel on Valley Mall Road near Hagerstown. The State Fire Marshal's Office says two devices were placed in the parking lot, but only one exploded. Officials tell The Herald-Mail of Hagerstown that bottles contained a volatile mixture of tin foil and toilet-bowl cleaner and were extremely dangerous.
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NEWS
September 6, 2011
HAGERSTOWN — Fire officials say one of two soda-bottle bombs placed in a hotel parking lot exploded, but did not cause any injuries or damage. It happened about 1:45 a.m. Monday at Spring Hill Suites hotel on Valley Mall Road near Hagerstown. The State Fire Marshal's Office says two devices were placed in the parking lot, but only one exploded. Officials tell The Herald-Mail of Hagerstown that bottles contained a volatile mixture of tin foil and toilet-bowl cleaner and were extremely dangerous.
BUSINESS
By Tim Carter and Tim Carter,Tribune Media Services | August 10, 2008
How can I remove brick mortar from the sidewalk I just built with paver bricks? My husband and I got the mortar smeared on the brick, and it looks terrible. Is there a nontoxic way to do this? Smeared mortar on brick is a very common problem. Depending upon the type of brick, the job can be simple or a nightmare. Because you are concerned about the toxicity of different options, you may find it very hard to do this job. There are some pretty aggressive acids you can use, and the ones that work faster tend to be more toxic.
BUSINESS
By Tim Carter and Tim Carter,Tribune Media Services | August 10, 2008
How can I remove brick mortar from the sidewalk I just built with paver bricks? My husband and I got the mortar smeared on the brick, and it looks terrible. Is there a nontoxic way to do this? Smeared mortar on brick is a very common problem. Depending upon the type of brick, the job can be simple or a nightmare. Because you are concerned about the toxicity of different options, you may find it very hard to do this job. There are some pretty aggressive acids you can use, and the ones that work faster tend to be more toxic.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1997
Morning commuters were tied up in traffic for hours yesterday after 18,000 gallons of hydrochloric acid spilled from a train near Interstate 895 and Pulaski Highway, shutting down both roads and Amtrak service between Baltimore and Philadelphia.The tank car was carrying about 23,000 gallons of the acid when it was rammed by a boxcar and began leaking about 5 a.m. at CSX's Bayview Yard, said Battalion Chief Hector L. Torres, spokesman for the Baltimore Fire Department.No evacuations were ordered, but James Buttner, a 52-year-old firefighter who works in Northeast Baltimore, reportedly suffered minor back injuries while helping to clean the site, Torres said.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | April 12, 1995
A downtown Baltimore pharmaceutical company was evacuated and several employees injured yesterday morning after two chemicals spilled and formed a potentially deadly gas cloud, fire officials said.The spill on the fourth floor of PharmaKinetics Laboratories Inc. closed the 300 block of W. Fayette St. for three hours and delayed light rail trains for 30 minutes while fire engines blocked the tracks.Fourteen fire engines and ambulances responded to the office building at 302 W. Fayette St. about 8:30 a.m. Firefighters wearing protective suits spent several hours airing out the building and mopping up the liter of spilled chemicals from a laboratory floor.
NEWS
September 24, 1998
Fifteen to 20 gallons of hydrochloric acid leaked from a tractor-trailer at the Old Dominion Freight Lines building Tuesday morning in Elkridge after metal in the rig punctured three 55-gallon drums holding the hazardous material.No one was hurt and no one complained of feeling faint or dizzy, said Capt. M. Sean Kelly, a spokesman for the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services.Firefighters received an alert at 9: 43 a.m. and had the spill under control by 11: 33 a.m., Kelly said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1996
Albert DeMilo thinks he has a soup recipe to die for.DeMilo, a chemist at the Agricultural Research Service's lab in Beltsville, has cooked up a hearty broth of chicken feathers and hydrochloric acid that could help track and eradicate destructive insects such as the Mediterranean fruit fly.The Bowie resident's discovery began as many recipes do. He borrowed a cup of ingredients from a neighbor -- in this case, pulverized chicken feathers from another scientist.Feathers,...
NEWS
By Phillip Davis | September 14, 1990
A Fairfield chemical plant, the scene of two chemical emissions this summer that briefly closed the Harbor Tunnel, agreed yesterday to drastically cut its releases of two toxic chemicals, the state Department of the Environment said.Vista Chemical Co., in the 3400 block of Fairfield Road, makes chemical components of detergents and other chemicals, such as hydrochloric acid, and employs 190 people on its 70-acre site.According to the state, up to 29,000 pounds of the solvent benzene was evaporating from the company's wastewater treatment tanks into the air each year, and some 24,000 pounds of hydrochloric acid was escaping when the acid was loaded onto tanker trucks for shipment.
NEWS
September 24, 1998
Fifteen to 20 gallons of hydrochloric acid leaked from a tractor-trailer at the Old Dominion Freight Lines building Tuesday morning in Elkridge after metal in the rig punctured three 55-gallon drums holding the hazardous material.No one was hurt and no one complained of feeling faint or dizzy, said Capt. M. Sean Kelly, a spokesman for the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services.Firefighters received an alert at 9: 43 a.m. and had the spill under control by 11: 33 a.m., Kelly said.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1997
An environmental coalition's report on air quality in heavily industrial southern Baltimore shows that eight pollutants were detected in elevated levels that indicate a need for further study to determine the risk to the public.The report, which was reviewed last night by the air committee of the Community Partnership for Environmental Protection at its Brooklyn office, deals with air quality in Cherry Hill, Brooklyn, Curtis Bay and Wagner's Point.The partnership, which was formed about a year ago, includes the federal Environmental Protection Agency, community activists and industry representatives.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1997
Morning commuters were tied up in traffic for hours yesterday after 18,000 gallons of hydrochloric acid spilled from a train near Interstate 895 and Pulaski Highway, shutting down both roads and Amtrak service between Baltimore and Philadelphia.The tank car was carrying about 23,000 gallons of the acid when it was rammed by a boxcar and began leaking about 5 a.m. at CSX's Bayview Yard, said Battalion Chief Hector L. Torres, spokesman for the Baltimore Fire Department.No evacuations were ordered, but James Buttner, a 52-year-old firefighter who works in Northeast Baltimore, reportedly suffered minor back injuries while helping to clean the site, Torres said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1996
Albert DeMilo thinks he has a soup recipe to die for.DeMilo, a chemist at the Agricultural Research Service's lab in Beltsville, has cooked up a hearty broth of chicken feathers and hydrochloric acid that could help track and eradicate destructive insects such as the Mediterranean fruit fly.The Bowie resident's discovery began as many recipes do. He borrowed a cup of ingredients from a neighbor -- in this case, pulverized chicken feathers from another scientist.Feathers,...
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | April 12, 1995
A downtown Baltimore pharmaceutical company was evacuated and several employees injured yesterday morning after two chemicals spilled and formed a potentially deadly gas cloud, fire officials said.The spill on the fourth floor of PharmaKinetics Laboratories Inc. closed the 300 block of W. Fayette St. for three hours and delayed light rail trains for 30 minutes while fire engines blocked the tracks.Fourteen fire engines and ambulances responded to the office building at 302 W. Fayette St. about 8:30 a.m. Firefighters wearing protective suits spent several hours airing out the building and mopping up the liter of spilled chemicals from a laboratory floor.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | August 8, 2001
Drugs and alcohol have been ruled out as factors in the derailment of the CSX train carrying hazardous materials through the Howard Street tunnel July 18, according to federal investigators. The negative results of toxicology tests on the train's engineer and conductor were returned yesterday to the National Transportation Safety Board team investigating the accident, said board spokesman Keith Holloway. Other than substance abuse, investigators have not eliminated anything else as a potential cause, he said.
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | October 26, 2007
The owner of a dormant Brooklyn Park pharmaceutical plant, which was found to have open chemicals and 50,000 gallons of hazardous waste on its property, has been ordered to clean up the site by year's end or face federal fines of up to $32,500 a day. A directive issued this week by the Environmental Protection Agency requires Consolidated Pharmaceuticals Inc. to remove a tank of flesh-eating hydrochloric acid by the end of the month and a host of other...
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