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NEWS
October 27, 2011
There are major problems with your editorial on the departure of Baltimore County Public Schools Superintendent Joe A. Hairston and the selection of the Baltimore County Board of Education ("Rethinking oversight," Oct. 16). First, it was the 12-member legislative task force, not the public, that could not "coalesce" behind a new selection process. Public opinion has been very clear, not only in meetings, but also through hundreds of phone calls, e-mails, letters and conversations over the past few years that BCPS is essentially dysfunctional and not directly accountable to the public.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Baltimore's police and fire unions are fighting a new proposal from Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake to privatize part of the pensions of new employees — a move union officials argue will make it harder to recruit and retain the best young officers. City finance officials say the privatization plan is the latest step needed to save the Fire and Police Employees' Retirement System, which they say is struggling and carries a $765 million unfunded liability. But union officials say the threat of pension collapse is overblown, and maintain that weaker benefits will cause talented recruits to go elsewhere.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
The Abell Foundation, best known for its charitable work battling poverty in Baltimore, went to court this week over a very different venture: designing hybrid engines for vehicles. Over the past 15 years, the foundation quietly became a player in the future of automobile development. It invested more than $25 million in Paice, a Baltimore firm that invented a way to improve the performance of combined gas/electric engines but in recent years has spent considerable time in court.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Opening a new hotel bar in Harbor East poses a challenge. Aesthetically, the neighborhood requires chicness, but there is also a desire to appeal to all comers, especially given the proximity to downtown. Straddling the line between comfort and sophistication demands a delicate touch. It all leads to the question: How does a hotel bar attract a local crowd? Apropoe's, the ambitious bar and restaurant inside the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel, has attempted to find an answer.
NEWS
January 10, 2003
An Anne Arundel County official, Robert L. Walker, got a new county car this week: a Honda Civic Hybrid, which uses gasoline-electric technology to get nearly 50 miles per gallon. It's the first hybrid car bought by the county, which plans to buy two more and evaluate their performance. It cost about $19,000, said Matt Diehl, a spokesman for County Executive Janet S. Owens. "We are taking a small but important step to improve air quality by encouraging others to consider low-emission, fuel-efficient vehicles," said Owens, who is driven around in a Ford Crown Victoria.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 27, 2008
Alexander Severinsky thought he had escaped long waits for basic goods when his family fled the Soviet Union in 1978. But barely a year later he found himself in his Oldsmobile Cutlass, in the Texas heat, at the end of a line of cars waiting to gas up. "I just came from Russia a year ago, where I stand in lines for food, and now what changed? I'm back in line, only for fuel," he said, laughing, in his accented English. Better fuel efficiency, he reasoned, could boost gas supplies and end the lines.
BUSINESS
By CAROLYN BIGDA and CAROLYN BIGDA,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 20, 2006
There are a lot of attributes to consider in a new car: the color, the engine, the brake system and something that's topping just about everyone's list - fuel efficiency. In fact, with gas prices averaging roughly $3, according to the American Automobile Association (compared to $2.37 a year ago and just a few cents shy of the record high set last fall), you might be tempted to base your search entirely on the number listed next to miles per gallon. Naturally, that would make hybrid vehicles, which rely on electricity stored in a battery for some of their power, a first choice.
TOPIC
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,Perspective Editor | April 17, 2005
If GM's problems make you think America's love affair with cars may over, you should stop by Russell Toyota on Route 40 West in Baltimore and have a chat with Andy Seidenman, the sales manager. Seidenman's problem is finding cars, not customers. Like other Toyota dealers across the nation, he has trouble keeping the Prius, Toyota's hybrid-engine car, on his showroom floor. The widely praised Prius, which promises 51 miles to the gallon on the highway at a time when gasoline is retailing for between $2.20 and $2.30 a gallon, has become wildly popular.
BUSINESS
By Rick Popely and Rick Popely,Chicago Tribune | February 17, 2007
After watching the Prius hybrid fly out of dealer showrooms the last six years, Toyota has started to nudge consumers with zero-percent financing and lease deals because supply has caught up with demand. Until recently, most Toyota dealers had waiting lists of two to three months for the fuel-efficient Prius, the most popular gas/electric hybrid model. But at the end of January, dealers had a 30-day supply, or about 10,000 vehicles, based on January sales. Toyota quietly launched its first incentives on the Prius at the end of last month and has extended the offers until Feb. 28, though it doesn't plan national advertising to promote the program.
NEWS
By JOHN FRITZE and JOHN FRITZE,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2005
In the latest government incentive geared toward reducing vehicle emissions and gas use, Baltimore officials will announce today plans to nearly halve the cost of parking in city garages for owners of hybrid cars. Fifteen city garages, from Little Italy to Pennsylvania Station, will take part in the program, which knocks up to $85 off the price of monthly parking contracts for hybrid owners starting Monday. The city is also considering reducing meter prices for hybrids. More than a dozen states and a handful of cities offer breaks that encourage drivers to purchase fuel-efficient cars, such as tax credits, less stringent inspections and access to lanes usually reserved for carpools.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
Baltimore unions and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake have struck a deal on her latest sweeping pension change, which would switch some new city employees from a traditional pension system to a 401(k)-style plan. The agreement -- which was passed by a City Council committee Thursday -- will give new workers an option of selecting a 401(k)-style plan or a "hybrid" plan that combines such an account with a traditional pension. Glenard S. Middleton, director of the union that represents city workers, said he negotiated with Rawlings-Blake directly on the issue and got about two-thirds of what the unions wanted.
NEWS
March 17, 2014
When debate over changing the composition of Baltimore County's school board last gained traction in the General Assembly, parents had a long list of grievances against then-Superintendent Joe A. Hairston and a board rightly viewed as overly deferential to him. Among other things, Mr. Hairston had appeared completely oblivious to the views of those he was supposed to be serving - the parents and children of Baltimore County - on matters ranging from...
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
The Abell Foundation, best known for its charitable work battling poverty in Baltimore, went to court this week over a very different venture: designing hybrid engines for vehicles. Over the past 15 years, the foundation quietly became a player in the future of automobile development. It invested more than $25 million in Paice, a Baltimore firm that invented a way to improve the performance of combined gas/electric engines but in recent years has spent considerable time in court.
NEWS
Liz Bowie | February 7, 2014
A bill to require a partially elected school board in Baltimore County gained overwhelming approval this week from a Senate committee, and will now go to the full Senate for a vote. Whether the eight-year effort by a group of county legislators and parents will have enough support to become law is still in question, but Sen. Bobby Zirkin, a Democrat from Pikesville, is more optimistic that it will pass this year. A hearing for the House bill is scheduled for next week, said Del. John Olszewski Jr., a Dundalk Democrat who chairs the county's House delegation.
NEWS
December 3, 2013
Baltimore County's school board is one of the less than 10 percent of the school boards in the nation that is not elected by the local voters. Presently, members are selected by the governor who, in this case, is from Baltimore City. The next governor may be from Montgomery or Prince George's County near Washington, D.C. Why should a politician who has neither roots nor relationship to Baltimore County select our local educational leaders? Abraham Lincoln once said, "Government closest to the people governs best.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. plans to create a new cable television news channel with a blend of local and national programming and bring it to cities across the United States over the next couple of years, CEO David Smith said Tuesday. Smith expanded on his vision for a hybrid local/national network a day after the Hunt Valley broadcaster announced its largest acquisition to date: the purchase of eight television stations for nearly $1 billion, including NewsChannel 8, a 24-hour cable/satellite all-news network that covers the Washington metro area.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2002
As sport utility vehicles and other gas guzzlers motored by on Key Highway yesterday, proponents of "green" technology showcased a new breed of automobile on Rash Field., Some are small and spacey - like George Jetson's car but with wheels and a solar panel roof. Others, such as the Honda and Toyota hybrid-fuel vehicles on the market, won't stand out as much in parking lots. The vehicles, on display today at a festival sponsored by the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association, run on sun, hydrogen, electricity and even vegetable oil - the "greasecar" conversion system that Justin Carven sells uses old cooking oil thrown out by restaurants.
NEWS
By Beth Daley and Beth Daley,BOSTON GLOBE | June 22, 2001
It sounds like a bad joke: What happens when you cross a spotted owl with a barred owl? A sparred owl. Only there is no punch line. The hybrid with huge eyes has been spotted in Pacific Northwest forests being nurtured by its odd-couple parents, a genetic concoction of two species that met only in recent years. But, unlike the classic classroom example of a donkey and horse that mate to create an infertile mule, sparred owls may be mating with barred and spotted owls, blurring the lines between the two species and maybe one day interbreeding the threatened spotted owl out of existence.
EXPLORE
By L'Oreal Thompson | March 20, 2013
Move over, Zumba. There's a new fitness craze in town. Piloxing, which is a fusion of Pilates and boxing, debuted in Columbia last fall and continues to grow in popularity. Piloxing's blend of the cardiovascular benefits of boxing and the muscle toning of Pilates makes for a well-rounded and challenging workout, says Megan Cooperman, a group fitness supervisor for the Columbia Association, which hosts classes at local gyms. “You work your upper body and develop strength from boxing,” she says.
SPORTS
The Washington Post | January 14, 2013
The applause echoed through the rafters and the sound of stomping feet rumbled across the aluminum bleachers as members of the Washington Capitals stepped onto the ice Sunday morning. As the players warmed up, the rows of fans who packed the seats and lined up three-deep behind the glass began a familiar serenade: "C-A-P-S! Caps! Caps! Caps!" Amid the celebration, Adam Oates smiled as he took to the ice to run his first official practice as a head coach. After waiting more than four months because of the NHL lockout and spending the past week watching his players work out without being able to instruct them, he was more than ready for the moment.
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