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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
I'm tired of planting tulip bulbs for voles to eat. What bulbs won't they eat? Squirrels, voles and chipmunks can all be the bane of bulb gardeners, but there are lots of rodent-proof choices - including daffodils, which now come in shades from pink to white with orange highlights, as well as many fascinating forms and fragrances. Other options include hyacinths (Hyacinthus orientalis), grape hyacinth (Muscari spp.), ornamental alliums, snowdrop (Galanthus spp.), summer snowflake (Leucojum spp.)
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By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
I'm tired of planting tulip bulbs for voles to eat. What bulbs won't they eat? Squirrels, voles and chipmunks can all be the bane of bulb gardeners, but there are lots of rodent-proof choices - including daffodils, which now come in shades from pink to white with orange highlights, as well as many fascinating forms and fragrances. Other options include hyacinths (Hyacinthus orientalis), grape hyacinth (Muscari spp.), ornamental alliums, snowdrop (Galanthus spp.), summer snowflake (Leucojum spp.)
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By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 1996
There is a wonderful way to add life and color to your home during the late winter months, even though the snow may be thick outside and spring weeks away. This easy process is called forcing flowers for indoor bloom.Most spring blooming bulbs adapt well to forcing, but some are )) more reliable and less fussy than others. The best of the smaller bulbs are Dutch crocus and snow crocus, Siberian squill, wood hyacinths, anemone blandas and grape hyacinths. These can all be transplanted out into the flower bed in spring while their leaves are still green.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
OK, so the first thing you need to know about this Midweek Madness installment is that it isn't quite mad. But let's face it, when you think of Patricia Routledge, who turned 85 this week, you think of Hyacinth Bucket (it's pronounced "bouquet"), the fussy, snobby character she portrayed to hilarious effect on the 1990s Britcom "Keeping Up Appearances. " (Given how often it still airs on PBS stations over here, perhaps it could also be called "Keeping Up Ratings. ") One of the many brilliant things about Miss Routledge is her ability to imitate hideous singing as Hyacinth.  It takes a true singer to do that perfectly, and she is a true singer.
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By Susan Reimer On Gardening | December 3, 2009
I am not sure whether it's gardeners anxious to extend the growing season - or those who market to gardeners - but paperwhite and amaryllis bulb kits are stacked for sale like fruitcakes at this time of year. These are the bulbs that can be "forced" to bloom out of season without the months-long hibernation required by tulips, hyacinths and their kin, and they provide a welcome alternative to the ubiquitous poinsettia. According to the National Garden Association, 4.9 million households purchased bulbs for forcing last year - up from 4.1 million in 2007.
NEWS
By Denise Cowie and By Denise Cowie,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 16, 2003
Dispirited by the frigid temperatures? Desperate for spring? Try this antidote to the winter blues: tulips. Check out almost any florist, garden center or even supermarket right now, and you're likely to see these cheerful blossoms in cut-flower bouquets or growing in pots. January through April is prime season for such potted bulbs as tulips, hyacinths and daffodils, which are forced into bloom early to please the winter-weary. It's easy to see their appeal. Just look out a window anywhere there's a pot of colorful tulips sitting on the sill.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | September 18, 2005
Do I need to water the shrubs I just planted, since it rains a lot in the fall? While fall plantings typically have the advantage of three moist seasons before a droughty summer spell, the weather doesn't always cooperate. September and October are often dry, and it is extremely important to ensure that new plants enter winter with adequate moisture available to their roots before the ground freezes. Monitor new plants for their first two years, and water as needed. I'm tired of planting tulip bulbs for squirrels to eat. What bulbs won't they eat?
NEWS
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | September 19, 2004
Put fragrance on your list of things to plant in the garden this fall. Springblooming tulips, hyacinths and daffodils are well-known for their reliability and traffic-stopping colors, but many of them also have wonderful fragrance. Fall is the time to plant them. You may forget about them over the winter, but in spring, their surprising and delightful scents will draw you outdoors and increase the pleasure you take in your garden. Fragrant spring bulbs can be planted wherever the soil drains well and sunlight reaches them in spring, but, to deliberately make fragrance part of a gardenM-Fs design, think about where you often walk or sit, and which way the wind usually blows.
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By Marty Hair and Marty Hair,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 3, 1996
Nostalgia for old plants is in vogue. Growing plants from heirloom seeds or eating antique varieties of apples links us with the lives of our grandparents and great-grandparents.Perhaps that helps explain why Scott Kunst and seven other people are working six days a week in Kunst's Ann Arbor, Mich., garage, filling orders for bulbs that were the rage decades or even centuries ago.Gardeners, museums and historic sites order from listings in the catalog of Old House Gardens, the mail-order company Kunst founded in 1993.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and By Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | April 21, 2002
An April breeze carries the scent of daffodil and fresh-turned field across the garden. I disengage a wad of chickweed, then stop to survey -- yet again -- the space I have cultivated for the past 16 years. But this time, I have an epiphany. I'm not going to make a whole new overarching design for the garden because -- and this is the epiphany part -- I'm not a grand scheme kind of person. It's a shock. Until then, I assumed I could -- and should -- redesign my garden to reflect a big change in my life, the transition between having children at home and children mostly away.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer On Gardening | December 3, 2009
I am not sure whether it's gardeners anxious to extend the growing season - or those who market to gardeners - but paperwhite and amaryllis bulb kits are stacked for sale like fruitcakes at this time of year. These are the bulbs that can be "forced" to bloom out of season without the months-long hibernation required by tulips, hyacinths and their kin, and they provide a welcome alternative to the ubiquitous poinsettia. According to the National Garden Association, 4.9 million households purchased bulbs for forcing last year - up from 4.1 million in 2007.
NEWS
By Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali and Jon Traunfeld and Ellen Nibali,Special to the Sun | September 18, 2005
Do I need to water the shrubs I just planted, since it rains a lot in the fall? While fall plantings typically have the advantage of three moist seasons before a droughty summer spell, the weather doesn't always cooperate. September and October are often dry, and it is extremely important to ensure that new plants enter winter with adequate moisture available to their roots before the ground freezes. Monitor new plants for their first two years, and water as needed. I'm tired of planting tulip bulbs for squirrels to eat. What bulbs won't they eat?
NEWS
By Marty Ross and Marty Ross,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | September 19, 2004
Put fragrance on your list of things to plant in the garden this fall. Springblooming tulips, hyacinths and daffodils are well-known for their reliability and traffic-stopping colors, but many of them also have wonderful fragrance. Fall is the time to plant them. You may forget about them over the winter, but in spring, their surprising and delightful scents will draw you outdoors and increase the pleasure you take in your garden. Fragrant spring bulbs can be planted wherever the soil drains well and sunlight reaches them in spring, but, to deliberately make fragrance part of a gardenM-Fs design, think about where you often walk or sit, and which way the wind usually blows.
NEWS
By Denise Cowie and By Denise Cowie,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 16, 2003
Dispirited by the frigid temperatures? Desperate for spring? Try this antidote to the winter blues: tulips. Check out almost any florist, garden center or even supermarket right now, and you're likely to see these cheerful blossoms in cut-flower bouquets or growing in pots. January through April is prime season for such potted bulbs as tulips, hyacinths and daffodils, which are forced into bloom early to please the winter-weary. It's easy to see their appeal. Just look out a window anywhere there's a pot of colorful tulips sitting on the sill.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and By Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | April 21, 2002
An April breeze carries the scent of daffodil and fresh-turned field across the garden. I disengage a wad of chickweed, then stop to survey -- yet again -- the space I have cultivated for the past 16 years. But this time, I have an epiphany. I'm not going to make a whole new overarching design for the garden because -- and this is the epiphany part -- I'm not a grand scheme kind of person. It's a shock. Until then, I assumed I could -- and should -- redesign my garden to reflect a big change in my life, the transition between having children at home and children mostly away.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | March 31, 2002
Though I've always loved the fragrance of hyacinths, I've never known quite how to gracefully plug them into the landscape. They're low and clunky -- like wooden shoes -- and don't go with many things. As a result, I've always used them like outdoor air fresheners, sticking a few here and there around the yard for a periodic whiff of something lovely. Then last year, I discovered camassia (Liliaceae scilloideae), a native bulb also known as Indian hyacinth (or wild hyacinth, camas, Indigo squill, meadow hyacinth and quamash)
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,Special to The Sun | November 13, 1994
GGABA, Uganda -- When green stalks started sprouting in Lake Victoria a few years back, workers in this fishing village paid little attention.Entrepreneurs sold the water hyacinth's purple flowers on streets in Kampala. Some hotels hung them in the lobbies. And the floating plant kept multiplying.It now strands fishermen miles from shore while their catches rot, prevents ships from docking and clogs water-treatment plant pumps. Shaggy green carpets hundreds of feet wide drift on the lake, sometimes hiding the surface for miles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2014
OK, so the first thing you need to know about this Midweek Madness installment is that it isn't quite mad. But let's face it, when you think of Patricia Routledge, who turned 85 this week, you think of Hyacinth Bucket (it's pronounced "bouquet"), the fussy, snobby character she portrayed to hilarious effect on the 1990s Britcom "Keeping Up Appearances. " (Given how often it still airs on PBS stations over here, perhaps it could also be called "Keeping Up Ratings. ") One of the many brilliant things about Miss Routledge is her ability to imitate hideous singing as Hyacinth.  It takes a true singer to do that perfectly, and she is a true singer.
TRAVEL
By Lisa Alcalay Klug and Lisa Alcalay Klug,Special to the Sun | April 11, 1999
A Menton tulip is the prima ballerina of its family, its lush, waxy petals the color of a ballet slipper. It grows waist high and its stem resembles a performer's long limbs. And when it covers the banks of a pond filled with swans, its pink reflection dances on the water, creating an almost impressionist illusion.Of all the stunning varieties of tulips growing in Holland's Keukenhof Garden last spring, the statuesque Menton stole my heart. But it had lots of competition. Like a Dutch version of the Garden of Eden, Keukenhof boasts a cliche-defying display of premium tulips, along with select azaleas, hyacinths and other blooms, which are planted amid 80 acres of lush greenery every year.
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By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,special to the sun | May 31, 1998
It can feed the soul, stir fears, calm, soothe or invigorate us. But scent is a personal thing: one person's fragrance is another's stench. While I love privet, a perfume that instantly propels me back into blissful childhood, a friend says it's like ... well, never mind. Planting for fragrance takes a little time and thought, but rewards the gardener, (and everyone else in the vicinity) with a breath from the Garden of Eden.PlanningThe first rule of thumb is to plant the scents you love or that flood you with memories -- lilac for the day your grandmother gave you her favorite brooch, the damask rose that was blooming when you graduated.
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