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By Andy Rathbun and Andy Rathbun,NEWSDAY | May 15, 2005
People aren't just "googling" at Google.com. They're also ogling, thanks to the artwork of Dennis Hwang. Hwang redesigns Google's logo on special occasions, turning the search engine's familiar four-color logo into fresh eye candy. For instance, to commemorate Leonardo da Vinci's birthday last month, Hwang changed the logo's colors to the chalky red tones of da Vinci's sketches, and replaced one "O" with a smirking Mona Lisa. Though Hwang, a former art student at Stanford University, likes celebrating artists best, his tweaked logos also have given birthday nods to Albert Einstein and Ray Charles, among others.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 21, 2006
Wait, wait, don't tell me! Isn't that a thingamabob? No, I mean a whatchamacallit? A gizmo? Kay Hwang's obsessively controlled drawings of what look like rows of mechanical gadgets or electronics parts, on view at Goya Girl Contemporary, leave you with the strange feeling that somewhere - though, come to think of it, you can't quite remember where - you've seen these things before, whatever they are. They have the deeply familiar look of ordinary things...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 25, 2003
Is there such a thing as aesthetic imagination? If so, you would certainly think artists had it if anyone did. Still, it's always a surprise to come upon works that at first sight seem so seductive and intriguing that they practically shout the presence of a powerfully original imagination. Such is the case with the delightful drawings of Kay Hwang, which are part of a group show of nine resident artists at School 33 Art Center through Jan. 16. Hwang's acrylic pencil drawings of simple, repetitive shapes that she builds up into complex geometrical forms have a magical three-dimensional quality that makes them seem to float and hover over the surface of their white backgrounds.
NEWS
By Bruce Wallace and Bruce Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 28, 2006
SEOUL, South Korea -- Much of the world may have dismissed him as a scientific charlatan, but discredited stem cell scientist Hwang Woo Suk is still not conceding a thing to his accusers. And those human stem cells he claimed to have cloned in 2005 that his former university later found to have been fabricated? They were human stem cells, Hwang insisted in Seoul's District Court this week, which is hearing charges that the scientist broke bioethics laws and embezzled more than $2 million from money donated to his research program.
NEWS
January 10, 1993
Fallston hospital honors 10 volunteersFallston General Hospital honored its volunteers at a recent awards ceremony.Joe Watkins was recognized for having volunteered 6,000 hoursand Betty Adams was honored for contributing 5,500 hours.Receiving awards for 5,000 hours were Mary Stephen and Frank Williams, while Edith Smith and John Bliss were honored for contributing 3,500 hours.Jean Fleckenstein and Nancy Benesch received awards for volunteering 2,500 hours..` Ruby Smith and Carol Paul wererecognized for contributing 2,000 hours of service.
NEWS
By CHOE SANG-HUN AND NICHOLAS WADE and CHOE SANG-HUN AND NICHOLAS WADE,THE NEW YORK TIMES | December 24, 2005
SEOUL, South Korea -- Dr. Hwang Woo Suk, the South Korean scientist whose research on stem cells and cloning propelled him to international renown, resigned from his university yesterday after an investigative panel there found that he had fabricated the paper in which he claimed to have created stem cell colonies from 11 patients. The South Korean government, which had vigorously promoted Hwang as the symbol of its drive to carve out a niche in biotechnology, admitted to "crushing misery" and said it planned to halt research funds for the 53-year-old scientist.
NEWS
By Bruce Wallace and Bruce Wallace,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 28, 2006
SEOUL, South Korea -- Much of the world may have dismissed him as a scientific charlatan, but discredited stem cell scientist Hwang Woo Suk is still not conceding a thing to his accusers. And those human stem cells he claimed to have cloned in 2005 that his former university later found to have been fabricated? They were human stem cells, Hwang insisted in Seoul's District Court this week, which is hearing charges that the scientist broke bioethics laws and embezzled more than $2 million from money donated to his research program.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 10, 2006
Dr. Hwang Woo-suk, the South Korean researcher who claimed to have cloned human cells, fabricated evidence for all of that research, according to a report released today by a Seoul National University panel investigating his work. The finding strips any possibility of legitimacy in human cell cloning from a researcher who had been propelled to international celebrity and whose promise to make paralyzed people walk had been engraved on a South Korean postage stamp. In his string of papers, his one legitimate claim was to have cloned the dog he named Snuppy, the panel said.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | August 10, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- So, you want to know how tough the men's marathon is?Take one look at Hwang Young-Cho of South Korea.He was sprinting down the final straight of the 26-mile, 385-yard race yesterday at the Summer Olympics. He was blowing kisses to the crowd, waving his arms, finally crossing the finish with a smile on his face.Then, Hwang took one step. And another. Dropped to his knees, got sick, landed face first on the track and was hauled away on a stretcher.And he was the winner.The Olympics ended yesterday with a marathon for the ages, not mention a race that had medical personnel scurrying around, scraping runners off the track.
NEWS
By BARBARA DEMICK and BARBARA DEMICK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 20, 2005
PYONGYANG, North Korea -- While watching child gymnasts tumble in unison across the field of Kim Il Sung Stadium in a performance heralding the miracle of the North Korean economy, Hwang Seon felt a sharp pain in her abdomen. Within minutes, the 32-year-old South Korean tourist was whisked by ambulance across town to Pyongyang's maternity hospital. There, doctors delivered a 7-pound, 6-ounce girl who has become an instant celebrity and rare source of optimism in this often-forlorn North Korean capital.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 10, 2006
Dr. Hwang Woo-suk, the South Korean researcher who claimed to have cloned human cells, fabricated evidence for all of that research, according to a report released today by a Seoul National University panel investigating his work. The finding strips any possibility of legitimacy in human cell cloning from a researcher who had been propelled to international celebrity and whose promise to make paralyzed people walk had been engraved on a South Korean postage stamp. In his string of papers, his one legitimate claim was to have cloned the dog he named Snuppy, the panel said.
NEWS
By CHOE SANG-HUN AND NICHOLAS WADE and CHOE SANG-HUN AND NICHOLAS WADE,THE NEW YORK TIMES | December 24, 2005
SEOUL, South Korea -- Dr. Hwang Woo Suk, the South Korean scientist whose research on stem cells and cloning propelled him to international renown, resigned from his university yesterday after an investigative panel there found that he had fabricated the paper in which he claimed to have created stem cell colonies from 11 patients. The South Korean government, which had vigorously promoted Hwang as the symbol of its drive to carve out a niche in biotechnology, admitted to "crushing misery" and said it planned to halt research funds for the 53-year-old scientist.
NEWS
By BARBARA DEMICK and BARBARA DEMICK,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 20, 2005
PYONGYANG, North Korea -- While watching child gymnasts tumble in unison across the field of Kim Il Sung Stadium in a performance heralding the miracle of the North Korean economy, Hwang Seon felt a sharp pain in her abdomen. Within minutes, the 32-year-old South Korean tourist was whisked by ambulance across town to Pyongyang's maternity hospital. There, doctors delivered a 7-pound, 6-ounce girl who has become an instant celebrity and rare source of optimism in this often-forlorn North Korean capital.
NEWS
By KAREN KAPLAN and KAREN KAPLAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 19, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- The South Korean researcher who was the first to clone human embryos for the creation of stem cells plans to establish a worldwide stem cell bank to make the technology available to other scientists. The World Stem Cell Foundation, set to be unveiled today in Seoul, intends to produce about 100 new cell lines each year and make them available to scientists, particularly those in the United States who have been stymied in their research by federal funding restrictions. The creation of the stem cell bank offers the possibility of sidestepping the Bush administration's restrictive policies governing the use of human embryos for research purposes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andy Rathbun and Andy Rathbun,NEWSDAY | May 15, 2005
People aren't just "googling" at Google.com. They're also ogling, thanks to the artwork of Dennis Hwang. Hwang redesigns Google's logo on special occasions, turning the search engine's familiar four-color logo into fresh eye candy. For instance, to commemorate Leonardo da Vinci's birthday last month, Hwang changed the logo's colors to the chalky red tones of da Vinci's sketches, and replaced one "O" with a smirking Mona Lisa. Though Hwang, a former art student at Stanford University, likes celebrating artists best, his tweaked logos also have given birthday nods to Albert Einstein and Ray Charles, among others.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | September 27, 2004
So, OK, you're not the most observant guy in the world. You're busy planning world policy, thinking lofty thoughts. Even after 20 years of living together, you haven't noticed every tiny detail of her appearance. Such as that, technically, she is a he. That's the real-life dilemma in which French diplomat Bernard Boursicot found himself in 1983 - a dilemma depicted by playwright David Henry Hwang in M. Butterfly, receiving a spellbinding production at Arena Stage in Washington. Boursicot's lover, Chinese opera singer Shi Pei Pu, was unmasked as a transvestite and spy. During the diplomat's trial for treason, he steadfastly maintained that he had believed Shi to be a she, and even that he had fathered a son with "her."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 12, 1996
Anyone familiar with David Henry Hwang's most famous play, "M. Butterfly," knows he is fascinated by the differences between men and women.That fascination surfaced early in his work and is central to his 1983 one-act play, "Sound of a Voice," which is receiving a sensitive and stylish local premiere at AXIS Theatre.But merely examining the chasm between men and women isn't sufficient for Hwang. He throws in other complex variables. In "M. Butterfly," the added complication is that the female lead turns out to be a man. In the two-person "Sound of a Voice" it's the possibility that the woman is a witch.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 4, 1997
In a David Henry Hwang play, East is never simply East and West is never simply West. Not only do they meet, they clash, and in Hwang's newest play, "Golden Child," the future is forged out of the struggle."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | December 25, 2003
Is there such a thing as aesthetic imagination? If so, you would certainly think artists had it if anyone did. Still, it's always a surprise to come upon works that at first sight seem so seductive and intriguing that they practically shout the presence of a powerfully original imagination. Such is the case with the delightful drawings of Kay Hwang, which are part of a group show of nine resident artists at School 33 Art Center through Jan. 16. Hwang's acrylic pencil drawings of simple, repetitive shapes that she builds up into complex geometrical forms have a magical three-dimensional quality that makes them seem to float and hover over the surface of their white backgrounds.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 4, 1997
In a David Henry Hwang play, East is never simply East and West is never simply West. Not only do they meet, they clash, and in Hwang's newest play, "Golden Child," the future is forged out of the struggle."
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