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Hussein Of Jordan

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By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 26, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- While many in his kingdom slept, King Hussein of Jordan confirmed early today his much rumored decision to replace his brother Hassan as heir to the throne with the monarch's oldest son, Abdullah.The announcement came in a one-paragraph royal decree read on Jordanian television at about 12: 50 a.m. The decree named the king's 36-year-old son as crown prince, the title held for 33 years by Hussein's younger brother, Hassan.Prince Abdullah, married and the father of two, is an Army major general who heads an elite palace security force.
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By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | February 15, 2004
A JOKE MAKING the rounds in the Middle East back in the 1970s placed King Hussein of Jordan - having gone to the great beyond - in the company of Satan in hell. The devil was showing the Hashemite monarch the rooms where the doomed would spend eternity, so he could choose one for himself. In the first room Hussein found King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia writhing on the floor, unwashed, tormented by vermin and bugs. Hussein shuddered and asked to see the next room. In the next room, Syrian President Hafez el Assad was being pulled apart on a medieval rack.
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NEWS
February 8, 1999
IT IS unsettling for the world to lose King Hussein of Jordan. He has been a rock in the turbulent Middle East since 1952, the victim the assassins could not kill, the regime no coup could topple, in a kingdom as small as it was artificial.And he was a force for comparative good, usually (not always) a friend of U.S. policy, an Arab leader with whom Israeli prime ministers talked, an autocrat whose fitful concessions to democracy were ahead of other Arab regimes.King Hussein's absence is mentally destabilizing to other players in the Middle East, including Washington, that took his presence for granted.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1999
Queen Noor of Jordan had a question for Jamaal Jordan of Baltimore.She'd come thousands of miles for this meeting and was hanging on every word, regal and blonde, earrings glittering. He, on the other hand, was 17, wearing gray sweats and a white T-shirt and had just said how tired he was of hearing that rap music makes people take drugs or shoot people.So then how about television shows, the queen asked. Were they a bad influence?"Naw, man," Jamaal said. "They got a PG-13 rating."So it went yesterday at the Pleasant View Gardens Boys and Girls Club on East Fayette Street, as 11 students told the queen and a handful of other international dignitaries about what it's like growing up in a rough neighborhood.
NEWS
August 19, 1995
The noose tightens about Saddam Hussein. Washington is yanking it. But don't count him out. Survive is what the Iraqi dictator does best.It would be a fine thing for the suffering Iraqi peoples if the thug fell. But the Clinton administration ought not allow that to become its stated policy objective. Previous administrations embarrassed themselves by marking tinpot annoyances for ouster, notably Libya's Muammar el Kadafi and Cuba's Fidel Castro, who still stand.It was bumptious of the administration to try so soon to persuade King Hussein of Jordan to boycott Iraq, but correct of it to try to end Saudi Arabia's boycott of Jordan.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 8, 1992
AMMAN, Jordan -- King Hussein of Jordan said yesterday tha Iraq was suffering badly under sanctions imposed by the United Nations and suggested it was time for Iraqis to end the government of President Saddam Hussein and push for a democratic, pluralistic society.Although the king did not specifically call for Iraqis to overthrow Mr. Hussein, he provided a bleak description of conditions in Iraq and an unusually caustic assessment of the man he long viewed as his friend and ally and actively supported during the Persian Gulf war and in its aftermath.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | February 15, 2004
A JOKE MAKING the rounds in the Middle East back in the 1970s placed King Hussein of Jordan - having gone to the great beyond - in the company of Satan in hell. The devil was showing the Hashemite monarch the rooms where the doomed would spend eternity, so he could choose one for himself. In the first room Hussein found King Ibn Saud of Saudi Arabia writhing on the floor, unwashed, tormented by vermin and bugs. Hussein shuddered and asked to see the next room. In the next room, Syrian President Hafez el Assad was being pulled apart on a medieval rack.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 13, 1995
AMMAN, Jordan -- A son-in-law and top aide of President Saddam Hussein of Iraq who defected to Jordan this past week vowed yesterday to work to topple the government in which he played a major role for more than a decade.The man, Lt. Gen. Hussein Kamel, was a chief arms procurer and senior decision-maker for the Iraqi government for more than a decade, during which time Iraq entered wars against Iran and Kuwait. He defected to Jordan last week, along with his brother, who is another son-in-law, and their wives and families.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 9, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- In death, King Hussein of Jordan brought together the heroes and the villains of his ultimate ambition to make this a peaceful region.They all came to his funeral yesterday. The peacemakers and the troublemakers. The optimists and the naysayers. Men who had wished him dead long ago. Others his armies had fought in war.American presidents and Iraqi diplomats, Arab leaders and Israeli prime ministers, former guerrilla fighters and retired generals, Europeans and those they once ruled assembled at a royal palace to pay their respects to the 63-year-old king who died Sunday of cancer.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1999
Queen Noor of Jordan had a question for Jamaal Jordan of Baltimore.She'd come thousands of miles for this meeting and was hanging on every word, regal and blonde, earrings glittering. He, on the other hand, was 17, wearing gray sweats and a white T-shirt and had just said how tired he was of hearing that rap music makes people take drugs or shoot people.So then how about television shows, the queen asked. Were they a bad influence?"Naw, man," Jamaal said. "They got a PG-13 rating."So it went yesterday at the Pleasant View Gardens Boys and Girls Club on East Fayette Street, as 11 students told the queen and a handful of other international dignitaries about what it's like growing up in a rough neighborhood.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 9, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- In death, King Hussein of Jordan brought together the heroes and the villains of his ultimate ambition to make this a peaceful region.They all came to his funeral yesterday. The peacemakers and the troublemakers. The optimists and the naysayers. Men who had wished him dead long ago. Others his armies had fought in war.American presidents and Iraqi diplomats, Arab leaders and Israeli prime ministers, former guerrilla fighters and retired generals, Europeans and those they once ruled assembled at a royal palace to pay their respects to the 63-year-old king who died Sunday of cancer.
NEWS
February 8, 1999
IT IS unsettling for the world to lose King Hussein of Jordan. He has been a rock in the turbulent Middle East since 1952, the victim the assassins could not kill, the regime no coup could topple, in a kingdom as small as it was artificial.And he was a force for comparative good, usually (not always) a friend of U.S. policy, an Arab leader with whom Israeli prime ministers talked, an autocrat whose fitful concessions to democracy were ahead of other Arab regimes.King Hussein's absence is mentally destabilizing to other players in the Middle East, including Washington, that took his presence for granted.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 8, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- King Hussein of Jordan, the eloquent, British-educated monarch whose 46-year reign delivered this desert kingdom from years of war to a fragile peace, died yesterday in this city where mourners from every walk of life joined his family in waiting for the end.He was 63. The king's eldest son, 37-year-old Abdullah, was sworn in as king. Prince Hamzah, the 18-year-old son of Hussein's fourth and last wife, American-born Queen Noor, was named crown prince. Setting out the line of succession was one of King Hussein's last official acts before returning Jan. 27 to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 27, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- Hours after King Hussein of Jordan settled a nasty family quarrel over his successor, the longest ruling monarch in the world hobbled aboard a royal jet yesterday and rushed back to a U.S. hospital where doctors have been trying to save his life.The king's last official act before boarding the plane was to swear in his eldest son, Prince Abdullah, as Jordan's new crown prince and the successor to the Hashemite throne. King Hussein, who has ruled this desert kingdom for 46 years, expressed "categorical confidence and trust" in his 36-year-old son and his ability to carry out his responsibilities "with the utmost dedication, loyalty and selflessness."
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 26, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- While many in his kingdom slept, King Hussein of Jordan confirmed early today his much rumored decision to replace his brother Hassan as heir to the throne with the monarch's oldest son, Abdullah.The announcement came in a one-paragraph royal decree read on Jordanian television at about 12: 50 a.m. The decree named the king's 36-year-old son as crown prince, the title held for 33 years by Hussein's younger brother, Hassan.Prince Abdullah, married and the father of two, is an Army major general who heads an elite palace security force.
NEWS
August 19, 1995
The noose tightens about Saddam Hussein. Washington is yanking it. But don't count him out. Survive is what the Iraqi dictator does best.It would be a fine thing for the suffering Iraqi peoples if the thug fell. But the Clinton administration ought not allow that to become its stated policy objective. Previous administrations embarrassed themselves by marking tinpot annoyances for ouster, notably Libya's Muammar el Kadafi and Cuba's Fidel Castro, who still stand.It was bumptious of the administration to try so soon to persuade King Hussein of Jordan to boycott Iraq, but correct of it to try to end Saudi Arabia's boycott of Jordan.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 27, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- Hours after King Hussein of Jordan settled a nasty family quarrel over his successor, the longest ruling monarch in the world hobbled aboard a royal jet yesterday and rushed back to a U.S. hospital where doctors have been trying to save his life.The king's last official act before boarding the plane was to swear in his eldest son, Prince Abdullah, as Jordan's new crown prince and the successor to the Hashemite throne. King Hussein, who has ruled this desert kingdom for 46 years, expressed "categorical confidence and trust" in his 36-year-old son and his ability to carry out his responsibilities "with the utmost dedication, loyalty and selflessness."
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 8, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- King Hussein of Jordan, the eloquent, British-educated monarch whose 46-year reign delivered this desert kingdom from years of war to a fragile peace, died yesterday in this city where mourners from every walk of life joined his family in waiting for the end.He was 63. The king's eldest son, 37-year-old Abdullah, was sworn in as king. Prince Hamzah, the 18-year-old son of Hussein's fourth and last wife, American-born Queen Noor, was named crown prince. Setting out the line of succession was one of King Hussein's last official acts before returning Jan. 27 to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 13, 1995
AMMAN, Jordan -- A son-in-law and top aide of President Saddam Hussein of Iraq who defected to Jordan this past week vowed yesterday to work to topple the government in which he played a major role for more than a decade.The man, Lt. Gen. Hussein Kamel, was a chief arms procurer and senior decision-maker for the Iraqi government for more than a decade, during which time Iraq entered wars against Iran and Kuwait. He defected to Jordan last week, along with his brother, who is another son-in-law, and their wives and families.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 8, 1992
AMMAN, Jordan -- King Hussein of Jordan said yesterday tha Iraq was suffering badly under sanctions imposed by the United Nations and suggested it was time for Iraqis to end the government of President Saddam Hussein and push for a democratic, pluralistic society.Although the king did not specifically call for Iraqis to overthrow Mr. Hussein, he provided a bleak description of conditions in Iraq and an unusually caustic assessment of the man he long viewed as his friend and ally and actively supported during the Persian Gulf war and in its aftermath.
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