Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHush Puppies
IN THE NEWS

Hush Puppies

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2012
Sharon Brazell from Severna Park was hoping someone would have the recipe for the hush puppies that were served at the Peter Pan Inn in Urbana. The restaurant, which closed in 1986, was famous for its plentiful family-style meals and beautiful setting. Brazell said her family, like many in the 1950s, '60s and '70s, would make the drive to the country restaurant near Frederick for special occasions to enjoy the food and setting, which included peacocks parading in the gardens.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 21, 2013
Heading to a crab house for a feast is fun, but nothing beats an afternoon of crabs in the backyard. Here are some tips for planning a feast of your own: Dress the part: Crab feasts are a dirty business; expect to get messy. Jen Harris, an upstate New York native who moved to Baltimore in 2010, learned this the hard way at her first crab feast. "Do not wear a dry clean-only blouse with white jeans," she warns. "Wear clothing you don't care about. " Set the table: Long, outdoor tables are ideal for crab feasting, but any table covered in newspaper or brown paper will do. Set mallets, knives and rolls of paper towels within easy grabbing distance of pickers (experienced pickers will appreciate bowls of water for hand-rinsing, too)
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard,
For The Baltimore Sun
| May 21, 2013
Heading to a crab house for a feast is fun, but nothing beats an afternoon of crabs in the backyard. Here are some tips for planning a feast of your own: Dress the part: Crab feasts are a dirty business; expect to get messy. Jen Harris, an upstate New York native who moved to Baltimore in 2010, learned this the hard way at her first crab feast. "Do not wear a dry clean-only blouse with white jeans," she warns. "Wear clothing you don't care about. " Set the table: Long, outdoor tables are ideal for crab feasting, but any table covered in newspaper or brown paper will do. Set mallets, knives and rolls of paper towels within easy grabbing distance of pickers (experienced pickers will appreciate bowls of water for hand-rinsing, too)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2012
Sharon Brazell from Severna Park was hoping someone would have the recipe for the hush puppies that were served at the Peter Pan Inn in Urbana. The restaurant, which closed in 1986, was famous for its plentiful family-style meals and beautiful setting. Brazell said her family, like many in the 1950s, '60s and '70s, would make the drive to the country restaurant near Frederick for special occasions to enjoy the food and setting, which included peacocks parading in the gardens.
FEATURES
By Lois Fenton and Lois Fenton,Contributing Writer | July 8, 1992
Q: My husband loves his dark gray suede hush puppies and insists that they can be worn in summer weather. He looks so hot and wintry and we have this argument. I know we women don't wear suede in the summer. Am I correct in telling him not to wear them in the summer even if he wears dark pants?A: Though women's suede shoes are widely considered part of that category of clothes reserved for wear between Labor Day and Memorial Day, men's and women's dress rules don't always coincide. On the other hand, if you are referring to a high desert boot style with a thick crepe sole, your argument is correct: the look is too hot for this time of the year.
FEATURES
By Lois Fenton and Lois Fenton,Contributing Writer | July 2, 1992
Q: My husband loves his dark gray suede hush puppies and insists that they can be worn in summer weather. He looks so hot and wintry and we have this argument. I know we women don't wear suede in the summer. Am I correct in telling him not to wear them in the summer even if he wears dark pants?A: Though women's suede shoes are widely considered part of that category of clothes reserved for wear between Labor Day and Memorial Day, men's and women's dress rules don't always coincide. On the other hand, if you are referring to a high desert boot style with a thick crepe sole, your argument is correct: the look is too hot for this time of the year.
NEWS
By David Zurawik | May 13, 2007
THE LAST DETECTIVE: SERIES 3 -- Acorn / $39.99 He is known to his colleagues on the Willesden police force as "Dangerous" Davies, but like almost everything else about this unassuming English detective, it is a term of disrespect. Everyone mocks Davies, and yet he always solves the crime -- as conservative, plodding and predictable as his approach might be. Season 3 of the British TV series based on the Dangerous Davies novels of Leslie Thomas arrives Tuesday on DVD, and it's a delight.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | July 28, 1996
The bald and the beautifulNever mind Demi Moore, whose scalp was perhaps the last of her body parts left to bare. Never mind model Eve Savail, whose baldness and skull tattoo are a signature. The fact is that many young women are taking to the same buzz cuts that are this summer's favorite guy style. Skinheadedness may not become the official mall-girl do, but it's gaining with artsy fashion rebels."They're usually homemade hairdos, but we've had buzz requests," says Neal Foore, owner of Neal's on Read Street.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | November 2, 2011
A lot of people think of barbecue and ice cream as strictly seasonal treats. Not so, say the regulars at Kloby's Smokehouse in North Laurel. From a counter-service barbecue joint that opened in April 2008, Kloby's has pretty much doubled in size so that it is now a full-service restaurant that can seat 150. And it now specializes not only in barbecue but in bourbon. And beer. And bread pudding. And ice cream. The new Kloby's began operations in June, after extensive renovations.
NEWS
By Dinah Johnson | September 12, 1999
'Sunday Week'Editor's note: A look at the activities one community takes part in all week long as it waits for Sunday, the best day of all.Blue Monday,everybody's gotthe Monday morning blues.On thosetrue blue Mondaysthe whole neighborhoodhas the blues.The grown-ups don'twant to go to workand the children don'twant to go to school.Miss Clara says,"One day at a time,sweet Jesus,that's all I'm asking from you."The double Dutch championsof the neighborhoodpractice everyTuesday afternoon,step step step step,high high high high,while people go onabout their businesshurrying here and there.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | November 2, 2011
A lot of people think of barbecue and ice cream as strictly seasonal treats. Not so, say the regulars at Kloby's Smokehouse in North Laurel. From a counter-service barbecue joint that opened in April 2008, Kloby's has pretty much doubled in size so that it is now a full-service restaurant that can seat 150. And it now specializes not only in barbecue but in bourbon. And beer. And bread pudding. And ice cream. The new Kloby's began operations in June, after extensive renovations.
NEWS
By David Zurawik | May 13, 2007
THE LAST DETECTIVE: SERIES 3 -- Acorn / $39.99 He is known to his colleagues on the Willesden police force as "Dangerous" Davies, but like almost everything else about this unassuming English detective, it is a term of disrespect. Everyone mocks Davies, and yet he always solves the crime -- as conservative, plodding and predictable as his approach might be. Season 3 of the British TV series based on the Dangerous Davies novels of Leslie Thomas arrives Tuesday on DVD, and it's a delight.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2004
E. Eugene Frock, a caterer and musician who operated Frock's Sunnybrook Farm for more than 30 years, died Tuesday of a ruptured aortic aneurysm at Carroll Hospital Center. The Westminster native was 74. Gene Frock, as he was known, took over the family business in 1964 and expanded what had started in the 1930s as a swimming hole into a full-scale banquet facility. Lenders were skeptical that he could fill the banquet room that could hold more than 600, Mr. Frock told The Sun in 1997 as he prepared to retire and sell the 20-acre property near Westminster's business district.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 2, 1999
Baltimore's next mayor doesn't take office for five days, but the impending departure of the city's leader for the past 12 years hit home yesterday when he saw a press release that read "Kurt Schmoke, former Mayor of Baltimore."It wasn't the kind of statement Schmoke was looking for, not on this of all days -- the day he turned 50 and one of the last days before he retires from decades of public service to go into private law practice.It was, Schmoke said, an example of "the syndrome of the king is dead."
NEWS
By Dinah Johnson | September 12, 1999
'Sunday Week'Editor's note: A look at the activities one community takes part in all week long as it waits for Sunday, the best day of all.Blue Monday,everybody's gotthe Monday morning blues.On thosetrue blue Mondaysthe whole neighborhoodhas the blues.The grown-ups don'twant to go to workand the children don'twant to go to school.Miss Clara says,"One day at a time,sweet Jesus,that's all I'm asking from you."The double Dutch championsof the neighborhoodpractice everyTuesday afternoon,step step step step,high high high high,while people go onabout their businesshurrying here and there.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 1997
We picked a terrible night to go to the Olney Ale House, but it had nothing to do with the restaurant itself. The problem was the rain. We had been told that a Sunday-afternoon drive past horse farms on Route 108 is part of the charm of a visit to this Montgomery County restaurant, but the rain was coming down so hard that taking the scenic route would have been futile.Owner Anita Virkus opened the Ale House in 1973. There's still a touch of hippie wholesomeness on her menu, notably in the lemon-tahini salad dressing and macrobiotic rice pudding.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2004
E. Eugene Frock, a caterer and musician who operated Frock's Sunnybrook Farm for more than 30 years, died Tuesday of a ruptured aortic aneurysm at Carroll Hospital Center. The Westminster native was 74. Gene Frock, as he was known, took over the family business in 1964 and expanded what had started in the 1930s as a swimming hole into a full-scale banquet facility. Lenders were skeptical that he could fill the banquet room that could hold more than 600, Mr. Frock told The Sun in 1997 as he prepared to retire and sell the 20-acre property near Westminster's business district.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 27, 1997
We picked a terrible night to go to the Olney Ale House, but it had nothing to do with the restaurant itself. The problem was the rain. We had been told that a Sunday-afternoon drive past horse farms on Route 108 is part of the charm of a visit to this Montgomery County restaurant, but the rain was coming down so hard that taking the scenic route would have been futile.Owner Anita Virkus opened the Ale House in 1973. There's still a touch of hippie wholesomeness on her menu, notably in the lemon-tahini salad dressing and macrobiotic rice pudding.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | July 28, 1996
The bald and the beautifulNever mind Demi Moore, whose scalp was perhaps the last of her body parts left to bare. Never mind model Eve Savail, whose baldness and skull tattoo are a signature. The fact is that many young women are taking to the same buzz cuts that are this summer's favorite guy style. Skinheadedness may not become the official mall-girl do, but it's gaining with artsy fashion rebels."They're usually homemade hairdos, but we've had buzz requests," says Neal Foore, owner of Neal's on Read Street.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | January 11, 1995
Hush puppies, a cornmeal treat, and an Oriental omelet offer a welcome change of menu.According to one -- believed-to-be-true -- fish tale, it was )R fishermen who named the hush puppy. Briefly, the story goes that after a day of fishing, they would sit by the river around a campfire over which an iron kettle filled with oil hung. In the deep, hot fat, they would fry their catch of fish, along with some cornmeal cakes. If one of their dogs would begin to howl, they'd throw it a cornmeal cake and call out "Hush, puppy!"
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.