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By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | September 14, 1992
It should be a moment of quiet despair: The character, a woman fraught with middle age-induced insecurity, asks her husband, "Do you think we'll ever break up?"The audience laughs.Woody Allen's movie, "Husbands and Wives," comes to the screen competing with Woody Allen's reality, "Lovers and Daughters."In a sneak preview last week at Loew's Valley Centre in Owings Mills, several hundred local viewers saw the movie that Mr. Allen was making as he was breaking up with long-time girlfriend Mia Farrow and taking up with her 21-year-old daughter, Soon-Yi Previn.
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By Michelle Obama | July 2, 2012
Shelly Snell is a registered nurse. She's been married to Navy Commander Ben Snell for 16 years. They have two boys. And as a Navy family, the Snells have moved nine times, including a stint in Maryland. It's a fact of life for military spouses - when the country calls, they step up to answer. When their loved ones are sent overseas for months on end, they're holding everything together back home. When the PTA, the parish council, the Little League or the Girl Scouts need a volunteer, they're the first ones to raise their hands.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | September 18, 1992
"Husbands and Wives" is Woody Allen's view of marriage -- through a glass of Alka-Seltzer, darkly.The movie is like a radiation trace of a disintegrating relationship; the wash of fiction is that thin and the slather of hostility that thick. Yet this is probably Allen's best movie since "Hannah and Her Sisters," a mature and sobering piece of work that is not only superb in its evocations, quite funny but also troublingly honest about its own biases.Allen really doesn't like women very much.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,[Sun Reporter] | February 25, 2007
Linda and David Stepp of Manchester believe some things are just meant to be -- like their marriage of 45 years. "We're both residents of Manchester. We grew up in the same house, but at different times. And we were both hired by Black & Decker in the same month on the same day, but [in] different years," said Linda Stepp, 63. "I really think we were meant to be together when you think of all the coincidences," she said. David Stepp joked that he would sit in front of her house in a 1958 Chevy.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 8, 1994
Boston -- It's not that I held Prince Charles on a pedestal, let alone a throne. Polo is not my sport and the Windsors are not my kind of folks. The ''royals'' always remind me of character actors at a Great Britain theme park.But who would have guessed that the crown prince would abdicate his country's last lingering claim to the stiff upper lip? Now, in a documentary being aired there, here and everywhere, he confesses royal infidelity.A broadcast journalist asks the Prince of Wales if he tried to be ''faithful and honorable'' when he was married.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 17, 2004
BOSTON - Does anyone remember that the original version of The Stepford Wives was a horror movie? Women weren't bribed or brainwashed or seduced into becoming the perfect domestic and sex goddesses of suburbia. They were murdered by their husbands and replaced by robots. The Stepford Wives was a dark backlash movie of the mid-1970s. The main character was Joanna Eberhart, whose tentative steps as a "hopeful, semiprofessional photographer" were threatening enough to send her husband off to the Men's Association for an uncomplaining, unambitious replacement.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2003
In reversing more than 75 years of case law barring lawsuits between husbands and wives, Maryland's highest court scrapped a legal doctrine rooted in the idea of women as chattel that it called a "vestige of the past, whose time has come and gone." But legal analysts were split yesterday over the likely effects of this week's landmark ruling. Some hailed it as a victory for women's rights, while others warned of an explosion in litigation and a new set of complications for divorcing couples and battered wives.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,[Sun Reporter] | February 25, 2007
Linda and David Stepp of Manchester believe some things are just meant to be -- like their marriage of 45 years. "We're both residents of Manchester. We grew up in the same house, but at different times. And we were both hired by Black & Decker in the same month on the same day, but [in] different years," said Linda Stepp, 63. "I really think we were meant to be together when you think of all the coincidences," she said. David Stepp joked that he would sit in front of her house in a 1958 Chevy.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 1, 2005
BOSTON - Didn't this all begin when we rediscovered that pillow talk in the White House doesn't always penetrate a president's ear? In the frenzied days after Sandra Day O'Connor's retirement announcement, first lady Laura Bush openly expressed her desire to see another woman on the highest bench. It was widely assumed that she was speaking for, or at least to, her husband. The media short list was quickly filled with skirts. Then along came John G. Roberts Jr. all dressed up in a suit and tie and carrying an inscrutable rM-isumM-i.
FEATURES
By Henry Scarupa | October 19, 1990
"People don't value life," says writer J. California Cooper, fairly popping out of the chair with enthusiasm as she makes her point. "Sometimes I kiss my hands and my knees because they work. Look, I can hold a glass of water. I can walk across the room. Life is a miracle!"People often misuse this gift of life, a failing which has provided Ms. Cooper with abundant material for three collections of short stories: "A Piece of Mine," "Homemade Love," and "Some Soul To Keep."Her work has garnered several awards, including the James Baldwin Book Award and the Literary Lion Award, both in 1988, and the Middle-Atlantic Writers Association's (MAWA)
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | August 1, 2005
BOSTON - Didn't this all begin when we rediscovered that pillow talk in the White House doesn't always penetrate a president's ear? In the frenzied days after Sandra Day O'Connor's retirement announcement, first lady Laura Bush openly expressed her desire to see another woman on the highest bench. It was widely assumed that she was speaking for, or at least to, her husband. The media short list was quickly filled with skirts. Then along came John G. Roberts Jr. all dressed up in a suit and tie and carrying an inscrutable rM-isumM-i.
BUSINESS
By EILEEN AMBROSE | August 15, 2004
IT WAS clear to Anne Lassiter that she and her husband would never retire at the same time, although they're close in age. "He, frankly, has no interest in retiring. ... He just likes his job, and he just doesn't see a great deal of value in retirement," said Lassiter, 61, of Alexandria, Va. Lassiter, though, mulled for a couple of years leaving her job as a planner with the Environmental Protection Agency. "One day I sort of woke up and thought, `My God, I worked a lot of years, and I probably worked enough years that my retirement is pretty good.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | June 17, 2004
BOSTON - Does anyone remember that the original version of The Stepford Wives was a horror movie? Women weren't bribed or brainwashed or seduced into becoming the perfect domestic and sex goddesses of suburbia. They were murdered by their husbands and replaced by robots. The Stepford Wives was a dark backlash movie of the mid-1970s. The main character was Joanna Eberhart, whose tentative steps as a "hopeful, semiprofessional photographer" were threatening enough to send her husband off to the Men's Association for an uncomplaining, unambitious replacement.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2003
In reversing more than 75 years of case law barring lawsuits between husbands and wives, Maryland's highest court scrapped a legal doctrine rooted in the idea of women as chattel that it called a "vestige of the past, whose time has come and gone." But legal analysts were split yesterday over the likely effects of this week's landmark ruling. Some hailed it as a victory for women's rights, while others warned of an explosion in litigation and a new set of complications for divorcing couples and battered wives.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | August 27, 2000
This newspaper headline certainly caught my eye: "Working wives have ill effect on husbands' health." Great. Something else for me to feel bad about, I fumed. And I thought we were worried about the welfare of the kids when we returned to work. Now we hear that hubby begins a slow slide into an early grave the minute we turn the key in the ignition for the daily commute. Dr. Ross Stolzenberg, a sociologist at the University of Chicago and a researcher with the Alfred P. Sloan center for Working Families and Children, combed the data gathered from 2,867 husbands and wives and found that when the wife works more than 40 hours a week, her husband's chances of being in good or excellent health decline by more than 25 percent.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | August 8, 1999
Clifton and Bertha Cox of Ellicott City have many things in common, but spending the same hours awake isn't one of them.Clifton rises at 3:30 a.m. to work as floor director at WBAL-TV. His wife, a studio camera operator, is off and running 12 hours later.Their toughest challenge is raising Gregory, their 2-year-old son. He spends mornings with Mom and evenings with Dad. Only once or twice a week will he get to spend time with both (at least while all three are awake)."The jobs are stressful in the medium we work in, and that's tough on any marriage," says Clifton Cox, 51. "What helps is that we work together.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | August 27, 2000
This newspaper headline certainly caught my eye: "Working wives have ill effect on husbands' health." Great. Something else for me to feel bad about, I fumed. And I thought we were worried about the welfare of the kids when we returned to work. Now we hear that hubby begins a slow slide into an early grave the minute we turn the key in the ignition for the daily commute. Dr. Ross Stolzenberg, a sociologist at the University of Chicago and a researcher with the Alfred P. Sloan center for Working Families and Children, combed the data gathered from 2,867 husbands and wives and found that when the wife works more than 40 hours a week, her husband's chances of being in good or excellent health decline by more than 25 percent.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | February 15, 1993
Three-hundred-sixty-four days a year, Hollywood's a late-night kind of place, with the after-hours clubs on the Strip wailing almost till dawn and the bright and beautiful young butterflies of the industry seeking pleasure in all its forms and costs.But one day a year -- it falls on Wednesday this year -- the town gets up with the cows, like any hick burg -- at 5:30 a.m.Groundhog Day?No. It's something else. It's . . . Producerhog day!That's because 5:30 a.m. Western Standard Time is 8:30 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, the last and most viewed half hour of New York morning talk-show frenzy, and that's when the Motion Picture Academy of Arts and Sciences hauls a few has-been stars out of the rehab centers to reel off the nominations for the 1992 Oscars.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 8, 1994
Boston -- It's not that I held Prince Charles on a pedestal, let alone a throne. Polo is not my sport and the Windsors are not my kind of folks. The ''royals'' always remind me of character actors at a Great Britain theme park.But who would have guessed that the crown prince would abdicate his country's last lingering claim to the stiff upper lip? Now, in a documentary being aired there, here and everywhere, he confesses royal infidelity.A broadcast journalist asks the Prince of Wales if he tried to be ''faithful and honorable'' when he was married.
FEATURES
By Betsy A. Lehman and Betsy A. Lehman,Boston Globe | June 29, 1993
June is the month of weddings, and even in this era of premarital activity, sex is in the air. There are the lingerie gifts at bridal showers, the teasing at bachelors' parties. There are the old jokes about wedding nights.But just as surely, June is the month of wedding anniversaries. And the jokes about long-standing marriages are a little different. People have headaches, not sex. They give their partners excuses, not ecstasy. They're too busy, too tired, too annoyed, too, well, whatever.
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