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NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | February 25, 1992
Marie Delores Apostoledes, 62, limped out of Baltimore County Circuit Court yesterday with a big smile on her face, having just been found not guilty of first-degree murder in the Aug. 5, 1988, shooting death of her husband, Stephen.She had been arrested Aug. 9, 1988, and charged with conspiring with one of her sons, John J. Lacey, to kill Stephen Apostoledes, 58, a cancer patient shot three times in the head by Lacey while sitting in his Dundalk kitchen.Lacey is serving a 30-year prison term for firing the fatal shots.
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NEWS
By Michael Ollove | September 12, 1990
Elias M. Shomali normally wears a banker's conservative business suit. Monday, he got to put on his shining armor.A Palestinian reared in the West Bank and now an executive of Signet Bank, Mr. Shomali came to the aid of a highly distraught young Palestinian woman and her 2-year-old daughter who had arrived Monday at Baltimore-Washington International Airport with 160 other evacuees from the Persian Gulf.The woman, who had come from Kuwait City, spoke almost no English, had no money, and had absolutely no idea where in the United States she could find her husband, who had come here just before Iraq's invasion of Kuwait to prepare an American home for his family.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | September 23, 1992
Arthur Copeland began his day last Jan. 17 by singing "Happy Birthday" to his wife of 18 months. He ended it by shooting her in the head, according to testimony yesterday in Circuit Court.Mr. Copeland, 57, is charged with assault with intent to murder in the incident at Marley Station Mall.In staccato sentences, his wife described yesterday the nightmare of being shot in the head, blinded by the shot and then pistol whipped as she was chased around the mall parking lot.Mary Copeland, 59, a public health analyst for the federal government, told jurors she met her husband the night of the shooting as they both pulled up to their home on Rock Hill Road in Pasadena shortly before 6.He told her to follow him, that he had a birthday surprise for her, she testified.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | May 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - A few words on behalf of Dixie Shanahan. Granted, some might consider her a less-than-sympathetic figure. After all, two years ago, Mrs. Shanahan, a 36-year-old from Defiance, Iowa, killed her husband with a shotgun blast to the head. She left his body decomposing on the bed for a year. But there is, as you might expect, more to the story. Mrs. Shanahan, backed up by friends, police reports and photographs of her own blackened eyes, testified that her husband, Scott, beat her repeatedly for years.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | April 28, 1991
Paula is an intelligent, ambitious, high-energy public relations expert who loves her work and has fairly skipped up her company's promotion ladder because, she says, "I'm good at what I do. I'm willing to work harder than anyone else. And I married the right man."The "right man" is an affable bear with a twinkle in his eye and a soft Southern accent who's held a dozen jobs in the 15 years of their marriage and is currently thinking of going back to college (again) to take a creative writing course.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1999
Maryland's highest court will take up today The Case of The Crumbled Marriage, a divorce case so strange and steamy that names of the participants have been hidden in court papers as "Doe v. Doe."For the first time, the Court of Appeals will consider whether a cuckolded husband can sue his wife for fraud and distress for lying to him about the paternity of "their" children.A lot of money is at stake. In a divorce, spouses divide up only the property acquired during their marriage. But in a civil matter alleging harm, a spouse can go after all the other person's assets.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | September 13, 1995
Bernadette Rosita Tyndale died because her husband decided that if he couldn't have her, nobody could, an assistant state's attorney contended yesterday at the beginning of the husband's murder trial.When Ernest A. Tyndale reported his wife missing on the afternoon of June 15, 1994, he told police that she had gone out for beer the night before and never returned.A short time after the missing-persons report was filed, police identified the body of a woman found strangled in Leakin Park as that of Mrs. Tyndale.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 21, 1994
Nobody gets sick like a man gets sick.And nobody gets sick in the peculiar way a man gets sick. You know, the kind of illness that rarely keeps them from their paying jobs, but renders them comatose at home. The kind of illness that allows them to have a perfect attendance record at work, but sends them to the sick bed on weekends or when you need them to watch the kids.My husband once covered a Cincinnati Bengals game with a temperature of 104 degrees -- from an open-air press box in arctic conditions.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 11, 1993
MANASSAS, Va. -- John Wayne Bobbitt, the self-described ordinary ex-Marine who was thrust into national prominence when his wife sliced off his penis, was acquitted yesterday on the charge that he provoked the attack by raping her.The jury of nine women and three men spent barely four hours deliberating before finding Mr. Bobbitt, 26, innocent of a charge of sexually assaulting his wife, Lorena. She had testified that he attacked her on an early June morning. He has variously said that they had consensual sex and that he does not remember if there was sex.There is no disagreement about what followed.
NEWS
June 27, 2007
Elizabeth Agnes Linhardt, a homemaker who was office manager for her husband, an Eastport surgeon, died of artery disease Saturday at Spa Creek Center. The Annapolis resident was 91. Born Elizabeth Agnes Weishaar in Baltimore and raised in Violetville, she was a 1933 Western High School graduate. She trained as an X-ray technician at St. Agnes Hospital, where she met her future husband, Elmer George Linhardt, then an intern. They married in 1938, and he became a surgeon. They lived in Eastport.
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