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Hurricane Wilma

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By JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG AND ELIZABETH MEHREN and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG AND ELIZABETH MEHREN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 25, 2005
NAPLES, FLA. -- Hurricane Wilma pounded its way across Florida yesterday, killing at least six people and causing widespread flooding, power outages and property damage. The storm moved with fierce speed, making landfall on Florida's west coast about 6:30 a.m. at Cape Romano, a deserted area south of Marco Island. Within six hours, Wilma had traversed the width of the narrow state, moving out to sea near Palm Beach. Only the Florida Panhandle was spared as Wilma delivered wind gusts of 100 mph and more, shutting 19 airports across the state.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
A relatively quiet hurricane season is nearing its end, likely to be the first since 1994 without a major hurricane forming in the Atlantic, according to researchers at Colorado State University. The season saw 13 named storms, which is about average. But storms rarely strengthened much, with just two reaching hurricane status despite predictions of a more active season. β€œIt was one of the largest busts for our research team in the 30 years we've been issuing this report,” researcher Phil Klotzbach said in a statement.
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NEWS
October 21, 2005
NATIONAL Preparing for Hurricane Wilma As Hurricane Wilma bore down on the Yucatan with the power to wreak havoc on one of Mexico's top tourist destinations. In Florida, officials and residents began getting ready yesterday for the storm's potentially destructive arrival. pg 3a WORLD Millions need shelter U.N. and private aid workers said yesterday that up to 3 million people in Pakistan's ravaged earthquake areas urgently need shelter before the harsh Himalayan winter sets in. pg 1a U.N. probe of assassination ends A U.N. investigation into the assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri concluded that high-ranking Syrian officials and their Lebanese operatives were involved in the killing.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Tropical Storm Gabrielle formed late Wednesday and quickly weakened to a tropical depression Thursday, and meteorologists are meanwhile watching several other systems that could eventually become tropical cyclones. The storm brushed past Puerto Rico and dumped heavy rains there earlier Thursday, but the National Hurricane Center's forecasts say it is not expected to restrengthen. That means the unusual streak without a hurricane this season will continue at least a few more days.
NEWS
By Ken Kaye and Scott Wyman | August 29, 2006
Though no longer expected to arrive as a hurricane, Tropical Storm Ernesto still could batter South Florida with up to 10 inches of rain, flooding and wind gusts to 70 mph, starting today and into Thursday, forecasters warned. Tropical storm warnings and hurricane watches remain in effect from Vero Beach south to the Keys, with Ernesto forecast to hit near Homestead, south of Miami, tonight. Then it is expected to churn northward. A flood watch was to be posted by this morning. Initially, the system was forecast to hit the region as a Category 1 hurricane, possibly stronger.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Tropical Storm Gabrielle formed late Wednesday and quickly weakened to a tropical depression Thursday, and meteorologists are meanwhile watching several other systems that could eventually become tropical cyclones. The storm brushed past Puerto Rico and dumped heavy rains there earlier Thursday, but the National Hurricane Center's forecasts say it is not expected to restrengthen. That means the unusual streak without a hurricane this season will continue at least a few more days.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
A relatively quiet hurricane season is nearing its end, likely to be the first since 1994 without a major hurricane forming in the Atlantic, according to researchers at Colorado State University. The season saw 13 named storms, which is about average. But storms rarely strengthened much, with just two reaching hurricane status despite predictions of a more active season. β€œIt was one of the largest busts for our research team in the 30 years we've been issuing this report,” researcher Phil Klotzbach said in a statement.
TRAVEL
By ALAN SOLOMON and ALAN SOLOMON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 6, 2006
SAN MIGUEL, MEXICO / / Cozumel is back. Not back to being the semi-exclusive sanctuary of the rich and yachted it was before the cruise-ship hoi polloi frightened them away. And the reefs aren't back either. They are a work in progress -- but of course, coral reefs are always a work in progress. And, OK, two of the three international cruise piers are still out of order, and, yes, the greenery on the mangroves is a little spotty, which is what happens when hurricanes happen. But everything else -- the hotels (all but a couple)
SPORTS
By KEN MURRAY | October 21, 2005
CHIEFS (3-2) @DOLPHINS (2-3) Time, line -- 7 p.m., Dolphins by 1 1/2 Skinny -- Hurricane Wilma postponed Dan Marino's Hall of Fame celebration and chased the Dolphins and Chiefs into a Friday night special. The Chiefs are tougher against the run this season, not so hot against the pass. Miami's Gus Frerotte is little more than serviceable in the passing game. Ricky Williams and Ronnie Brown will have to make the difference for the Dolphins. Pick -- Chiefs
NEWS
February 28, 2006
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. -- Despite the four hurricanes that hit Florida in both 2004 and 2005, a record-breaking 85.8 million tourists visited the state last year. Statistics released yesterday by Visit Florida, a public-private agency, show 85.8 million visitors spent time in Florida last year - the equivalent of the combined populations of California, New York, Florida and Illinois. It was nearly 6 million more visitors, a 7.6 percent increase, over 2004. Even Hurricane Wilma, which pounded South Florida in October, didn't dampen the numbers.
NEWS
By Ken Kaye and Scott Wyman | August 29, 2006
Though no longer expected to arrive as a hurricane, Tropical Storm Ernesto still could batter South Florida with up to 10 inches of rain, flooding and wind gusts to 70 mph, starting today and into Thursday, forecasters warned. Tropical storm warnings and hurricane watches remain in effect from Vero Beach south to the Keys, with Ernesto forecast to hit near Homestead, south of Miami, tonight. Then it is expected to churn northward. A flood watch was to be posted by this morning. Initially, the system was forecast to hit the region as a Category 1 hurricane, possibly stronger.
TRAVEL
By ALAN SOLOMON and ALAN SOLOMON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 6, 2006
SAN MIGUEL, MEXICO / / Cozumel is back. Not back to being the semi-exclusive sanctuary of the rich and yachted it was before the cruise-ship hoi polloi frightened them away. And the reefs aren't back either. They are a work in progress -- but of course, coral reefs are always a work in progress. And, OK, two of the three international cruise piers are still out of order, and, yes, the greenery on the mangroves is a little spotty, which is what happens when hurricanes happen. But everything else -- the hotels (all but a couple)
NEWS
By JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG AND ELIZABETH MEHREN and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG AND ELIZABETH MEHREN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 25, 2005
NAPLES, FLA. -- Hurricane Wilma pounded its way across Florida yesterday, killing at least six people and causing widespread flooding, power outages and property damage. The storm moved with fierce speed, making landfall on Florida's west coast about 6:30 a.m. at Cape Romano, a deserted area south of Marco Island. Within six hours, Wilma had traversed the width of the narrow state, moving out to sea near Palm Beach. Only the Florida Panhandle was spared as Wilma delivered wind gusts of 100 mph and more, shutting 19 airports across the state.
NEWS
October 24, 2005
NATIONAL Fla. braces for Hurricane Wilma With Hurricane Wilma on track to strengthen before striking the Gulf Coast of Florida this morning, officials braced for winds of 100 mph or more and the possibility of tornadoes. pg 3a Emergency plans called flawed Military officials have determined that the federal government's emergency response plans are seriously flawed, according to sources familiar with the officials' ongoing review. pg 4a WORLD Palestinian reform slow Hassan Abu Libdeh is on an ambitious, often lonely quest to reform how the Palestinian Authority does business.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 20, 2005
MIAMI -- South Floridians nervously - and possibly needlessly - filled fuel tanks yesterday, stocked groceries and tied down blue tarps as they monitored Tropical Storm Gamma. This time, though, the awful hurricane season delivered sunny news: With a little bit of luck, nearly all of Gamma's weather will bypass South Florida, a region still recovering from Hurricane Wilma, which hit less than four weeks ago. Forecasters said residents still faced the threat of rain and tarp-flapping gusts today and especially tomorrow, as a cold front approaches the area.
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