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Hurricane Rita

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NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN REPORTER | September 26, 2005
Hurricane Rita's late shift to the east spared all but a few Texas oil refineries from significant damage, likely sparing consumers a repeat of the gasoline price shocks that occurred after Hurricane Katrina pummeled plants in Louisiana a month ago, energy experts said yesterday. At least eight refineries in the Houston area that had shut down before the storm as a precaution were working on getting restarted, and two pipelines that serve the Baltimore and Washington metropolitan areas were delivering gas in the wake of the storm, industry sources said.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | May 8, 2014
Hurricanes Katrina and Rita were the cause of at least half of stillbirths reported in the areas hardest hit by the storms, a new study out of the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy has found. The study by Ian Breunig found that stillbirths were highest in parishes that suffered the most damage during the 2005 storms. The numbers of live births was nearly 40 percent lower in 2007 than in 2004 in these areas. Live births fell 79 percent in areas where more than half of residences were damaged.
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NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,Sun Reporter | September 25, 2005
NEW ORLEANS // The billboard on top of his apartment was in a heap by the front step, the leaky ceiling was ruining what was left of his belongings, and Robert McCalvin felt the same way that everyone else did about the hurricane that was responsible. "We got lucky," McCalvin said, sitting among the wreckage outside the Splish Splash Laundromat on Bienville Avenue, where he lives upstairs and hopes to work again if the people ever come back. "That one felt like a vacation." Perhaps only in New Orleans could so much flooding and storm damage seem like a blessing.
NEWS
By Warren Vieth and Richard Simon and Warren Vieth and Richard Simon,Los Angeles Times | September 27, 2005
WASHINGTON -- President Bush urged Americans yesterday to drive less and embrace conservation in the wake of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, and he said he would work with Congress to enact new incentives for energy production and refinery construction. The president said he was directing federal agencies to take steps to reduce energy consumption and that he would release oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve as needed to ease the shortages and price spikes caused by the two hurricanes.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | September 25, 2005
HOUSTON // Thousands of people are without power. Rumors that a gas station might open prompted motorists to wait for hours at the pumps. And Houston officials warned of traffic jams as residents who had fled the city began returning. But those are just annoyances. People in the nation's fourth-largest city are grateful that Hurricane Rita spared their lives and homes. "We've been blessed. We're not nearly in as bad a shape as we might've been, or as we thought we might be," Galveston County Judge James D. Yarbrough told reporters.
NEWS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,Sun reporter | September 24, 2005
Even with Hurricane Rita bearing down, deciding whether to move elderly patients or nursing home residents is complex. Hurricanes, obviously, can kill. But so can evacuations. There is a potential for missed medications, deadly dehydration, stress-induced heart attacks and malfunction of medical equipment. And the challenges continue at the other end of the trip because older people adjust more slowly than younger ones to change. Remaining can be perilous, too. In Hurricane Katrina, 34 residents left behind in a Louisiana nursing home drowned, leading the state's attorney general to charge its owners with 34 counts of murder.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun Reporter | September 26, 2005
HUNTSVILLE, TEXAS -- When Lietyna Eugene is feeling good, she speaks often about God and his blessings. She talks about prayers that have been answered during her time away from New Orleans. And she smiles and laughs a lot - much more than she cries. But when she stops to think about the future, Eugene becomes nervous. And bitter. "How am I going to pay my rent?" she asked. "Or get a job while we wait for them to rebuild our neighborhood? And if I can't, are we going to get put out?" It has been nearly a month since Hurricane Katrina destroyed her home, flooding the Ninth Ward where she lived and from which she escaped with her fiance, two daughters and seven grandchildren.
NEWS
By HOWARD WITT AND LOLLY BOWEAN and HOWARD WITT AND LOLLY BOWEAN,Chicago Tribune | September 25, 2005
LAKE CHARLES, LA. // As bad as it was, Rita was no Katrina. Lightning, it turned out, did not strike twice. Hurricane Rita pounded east Texas and the Gulf Coast of Louisiana yesterday, causing widespread property damage, sparking fires and swamping parts of Louisiana with a 15-foot storm surge. But the Category 3 storm fell short of its deadly advance billing and proved far less devastating to the region than Hurricane Katrina, which destroyed much of New Orleans and vast sections of coastal Mississippi a month earlier, taking more than 1,000 lives.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun Reporter | September 25, 2005
LAKE CHARLES, LA. // Dean Doe has ridden out three hurricanes at sea during his years as a ship captain and river pilot. But listening to Hurricane Rita tear through his leafy neighborhood in this port city upriver from the Gulf of Mexico was far worse. "In your ship, you have some type of control," Doe, 45, said yesterday. "As long as you're not caught in the hurricane, you can run from it. Sitting in a house, you knew it was coming to you instead of going away from it. It was just a nightmare."
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,Sun reporter | September 24, 2005
As Hurricane Rita bears down on the gulf region, the back-to-back hurricanes have caused an unusually high number of cancellations by airlines, affecting passengers who never intended to set foot in the region and further burdening already ailing air- lines. While many carriers have begun rescheduling flights, rerouting planes and adding service elsewhere to keep flying, they have thousands of flights to make up for, and the season of storms isn't over. "This will be a major blip for the airlines," said Terry Trippler, who monitors airlines for cheapseats .com, an Internet fare finder.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Lolly Bowean and Bill Glauber and Lolly Bowean,Chicago Tribune | September 27, 2005
NEW ORLEANS -- Residents and business owners of this storm-ravaged city are trickling into reopened neighborhoods to resume the huge challenge of restarting lives and rebuilding. Meanwhile, the Bush administration was assessing the impact of Hurricane Rita, which roared through the Gulf Coast region Saturday and cut a swath through an area that accounts for about 29 percent of the country's domestic output of crude oil production. There were reports, though, that refineries in the hurricane zone came through the storm without significant damage.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun Reporter | September 26, 2005
HUNTSVILLE, TEXAS -- When Lietyna Eugene is feeling good, she speaks often about God and his blessings. She talks about prayers that have been answered during her time away from New Orleans. And she smiles and laughs a lot - much more than she cries. But when she stops to think about the future, Eugene becomes nervous. And bitter. "How am I going to pay my rent?" she asked. "Or get a job while we wait for them to rebuild our neighborhood? And if I can't, are we going to get put out?" It has been nearly a month since Hurricane Katrina destroyed her home, flooding the Ninth Ward where she lived and from which she escaped with her fiance, two daughters and seven grandchildren.
NEWS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN REPORTER | September 26, 2005
Hurricane Rita's late shift to the east spared all but a few Texas oil refineries from significant damage, likely sparing consumers a repeat of the gasoline price shocks that occurred after Hurricane Katrina pummeled plants in Louisiana a month ago, energy experts said yesterday. At least eight refineries in the Houston area that had shut down before the storm as a precaution were working on getting restarted, and two pipelines that serve the Baltimore and Washington metropolitan areas were delivering gas in the wake of the storm, industry sources said.
NEWS
By Howard Witt and Howard Witt,Chicago Tribune | September 26, 2005
NEW ORLEANS -- Houston leaped back to business yesterday and New Orleans began clearing its sodden streets all over again as dozens of smaller cities and towns lining the Gulf Coast in between began assessing the damage wrought by Hurricane Rita. The overall verdict, despite smashed fishing towns, downed trees, snapped electric lines and a handful of coastal residents stranded by flooding: Things could have been much worse. "As bad as it could have been, we came out of this in pretty good shape," Texas Gov. Rick Perry said after taking a helicopter tour of the hardest-hit eastern portions of his state yesterday.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | September 26, 2005
BIG LAKE ISLAND, LA. -- Agent Wayne Matirne was on a mission to check this sprawling island on the Intracoastal Waterway for residents stranded by Hurricane Rita - if only he could find clear roadways and a boat launch not clogged with office furniture, dead livestock, marsh grasses and other debris from the storm. Once on the water, the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Enforcement agent and his partner steered a 25-foot Boston Whaler past the barges and buoys, past the oil refineries and fine waterfront homes suddenly in the water, to the rural communities of humble houses and summer homes tucked into the remote nooks of this island south of Lake Charles, near the Texas border.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Reporter | September 25, 2005
Baltimore is not Houston. It's a smaller metropolitan area. It's not on an exposed coast. Most hurricanes have dwindled to tropical storms by the time they get this far inland. Any scenario requiring a citywide evacuation is much more improbable here than in the Texas metropolis. But what if? State officials charged with emergency preparations say that if Baltimoreans did have to evacuate in a disaster, backups would be inevitable. But they doubt the traffic jams would reach the nightmare proportions of Houston, where traffic froze on the interstates out of town and thousands of cars ran out of gasoline before they could get free.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Bradley Olson and Dennis O'Brien and Bradley Olson,Sun reporters | September 23, 2005
HOUSTON -- State and local officials tailored preparations for Hurricane Rita to avoid the mistakes their counterparts made when Katrina devastated New Orleans and nearby Mississippi almost a month ago. Yesterday, they told a million people along a broad stretch of Texas' Gulf Coast to get out of town before the hurricane arrives - and, unlike officials in New Orleans, provided buses for many of those who had no cars. They brought in extra police and National Guard troops, this time with what they hope is enough communications equipment to do the job. Many hospitals closed down and transferred their patients to facilities on higher ground - hoping to avoid the suffering and deaths that occurred among patients stuck in New Orleans' flooded hospitals.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,Sun reporter | September 24, 2005
NEW ORLEANS -- Just as this empty city seemed to be awakening from its nightmare, the familiar image of rescue helicopters buzzing over flooded rooftops returned yesterday to neighborhoods where street sweepers and utility crews had been only days before. Surging tides from Hurricane Rita, rising several feet higher than engineers had predicted, jumped the patchwork levee system on the city's east side to swallow streets and houses that had just emerged from three weeks beneath the floodwater of Hurricane Katrina.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,Sun Reporter | September 25, 2005
NEW ORLEANS // The billboard on top of his apartment was in a heap by the front step, the leaky ceiling was ruining what was left of his belongings, and Robert McCalvin felt the same way that everyone else did about the hurricane that was responsible. "We got lucky," McCalvin said, sitting among the wreckage outside the Splish Splash Laundromat on Bienville Avenue, where he lives upstairs and hopes to work again if the people ever come back. "That one felt like a vacation." Perhaps only in New Orleans could so much flooding and storm damage seem like a blessing.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Reporter | September 25, 2005
HOUSTON // Thousands of people are without power. Rumors that a gas station might open prompted motorists to wait for hours at the pumps. And Houston officials warned of traffic jams as residents who had fled the city began returning. But those are just annoyances. People in the nation's fourth-largest city are grateful that Hurricane Rita spared their lives and homes. "We've been blessed. We're not nearly in as bad a shape as we might've been, or as we thought we might be," Galveston County Judge James D. Yarbrough told reporters.
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