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Hurricane Mitch

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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 18, 1998
The Bank of Maryland has launched a clothing and food drive for victims of Hurricane Mitch in Nicaragua and Honduras, among the Central American nations devastated by the storm.One of the bank's branch managers, Ammy Chavez of Perry Hall, is heading the drive that aims to collect medicine, medicalsupplies, bottled water and food for victims of the storm, estimated to have left more than 10,000 dead and 3 million homeless.Donations may be made at any Bank of Maryland branch by the end of the month, Chavez said.
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TOPIC
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,SUN PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | January 2, 2005
The tsunamis that have devastated South Asia are proving that Americans are remarkably eager to show they care -- delivering a torrent of money already totaling tens of millions of dollars to private relief groups by Internet, phone and mail. Last week, the flood of giving briefly knocked down the Internet site of Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services, where President Ken Hackett called the response extraordinary. "All of the sudden, people are saying, `How can we let something like this happen?
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NEWS
November 8, 1998
MEMORIES OF Hurricane Andrew help us appreciate the devastation that Hurricane Mitch left behind in Central America. Andrew was one of the most powerful Atlantic storms of the century when it blew into Dade County, Fla. The 1992 storm killed 14 people and left 40,000 homeless. But that storm's fury does not compare with Mitch's path of death and destruction.The hurricane, later downgraded to a tropical storm, killed at least 9,000 people. Many were buried in mudslides. Another 13,000 people are missing.
NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 1999
IMAGINE YOUR HOME, your school and part of your hometown washed away by a raging river during a hurricane.For residents of Chilanguera, a poverty-stricken town in El Salvador, that nightmare became a reality when Hurricane Mitch roared through in October. Of the 2,000 townspeople, 180 residents were killed when the river deluged the town.Mount Airy Elementary art teacher and Westminster resident Pat Aaron was among the 14 members of the 29th Aviation Unit of the Maryland Army National Guard who worked June 5-19 in El Salvador to help the town rebuild roads, bridges, homes and schools.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1998
It was when the lights started flickering in the small, Spanish-built hospital last Wednesday that Dr. John E. Herzenberg knew Hurricane Mitch had struck the remote Nicaraguan village where he was working."
NEWS
By Donna Abel and Donna Abel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 2, 1999
IMAGINE YOUR HOME, your school and part of your hometown washed away by a raging river during a hurricane.For residents of Chilanguera, a poverty-stricken town in El Salvador, that nightmare became a reality when Hurricane Mitch roared through in October. Of the 2,000 townspeople, 180 residents were killed when the river deluged the town.Mount Airy Elementary art teacher and Westminster resident Pat Aaron was among the 14 members of the 29th Aviation Unit of the Maryland Army National Guard who worked June 5-19 in El Salvador to help the town rebuild roads, bridges, homes and schools.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1999
From helpful to unusable, U.S. donations for refugees expelled from Kosovo are flooding relief agencies at a record pace, nine weeks after NATO bombs began to rain on Yugoslavia.Coming so quickly after Hurricane Mitch devastated Central America in October, the response to the Balkan crisis has heartened agencies worried about donor fatigue.At the same time, relief workers laboring in other parts of the world -- and on social issues here -- are shaking their heads at the selectivity of the media's focus and donors' attention.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 29, 1998
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Forget for a minute the shaky science, the cynics, Hurricane Mitch, the threatening meteor shower and even the six cockroaches from Maryland that also will be on board.Today, with the world watching, John Glenn is scheduled to rocket away from Earth for the second time in his illustrious career and return to space as history's oldest astronaut.With blast-off set for 2 p.m., the shuttle Discovery is poised to carry Glenn, the 77-year-old Democratic senator from Ohio, and his six crew mates into orbit for the start of a nine-day mission.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A week after refusing to support NATO's air war in Yugoslavia, the House voted overwhelmingly yesterday to give President Clinton more than twice the $6 billion sum he had requested to pay for it.Though critical of Clinton's handling of the NATO campaign, Republican leaders took advantage of a chance to allocate extra money for military needs unrelated to Kosovo.All the money would come out of the Social Security trust fund and would not be subject to strict budget limits."The time is now to deter our enemies by bolstering our military," Rep. Tom DeLay of Texas, the House Republican whip, exhorted his colleagues.
TOPIC
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,SUN PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | January 2, 2005
The tsunamis that have devastated South Asia are proving that Americans are remarkably eager to show they care -- delivering a torrent of money already totaling tens of millions of dollars to private relief groups by Internet, phone and mail. Last week, the flood of giving briefly knocked down the Internet site of Baltimore-based Catholic Relief Services, where President Ken Hackett called the response extraordinary. "All of the sudden, people are saying, `How can we let something like this happen?
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | May 27, 1999
From helpful to unusable, U.S. donations for refugees expelled from Kosovo are flooding relief agencies at a record pace, nine weeks after NATO bombs began to rain on Yugoslavia.Coming so quickly after Hurricane Mitch devastated Central America in October, the response to the Balkan crisis has heartened agencies worried about donor fatigue.At the same time, relief workers laboring in other parts of the world -- and on social issues here -- are shaking their heads at the selectivity of the media's focus and donors' attention.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- A week after refusing to support NATO's air war in Yugoslavia, the House voted overwhelmingly yesterday to give President Clinton more than twice the $6 billion sum he had requested to pay for it.Though critical of Clinton's handling of the NATO campaign, Republican leaders took advantage of a chance to allocate extra money for military needs unrelated to Kosovo.All the money would come out of the Social Security trust fund and would not be subject to strict budget limits."The time is now to deter our enemies by bolstering our military," Rep. Tom DeLay of Texas, the House Republican whip, exhorted his colleagues.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 18, 1998
The Bank of Maryland has launched a clothing and food drive for victims of Hurricane Mitch in Nicaragua and Honduras, among the Central American nations devastated by the storm.One of the bank's branch managers, Ammy Chavez of Perry Hall, is heading the drive that aims to collect medicine, medicalsupplies, bottled water and food for victims of the storm, estimated to have left more than 10,000 dead and 3 million homeless.Donations may be made at any Bank of Maryland branch by the end of the month, Chavez said.
NEWS
November 17, 1998
Middle East talks should be a model for dealing with IraqThee editorial "Multilateral response to Iraq's provocation" (Nov. 11) exemplifies the adage that it's a lot easier to see what others should do than what we should do ourselves.The Sun regularly promotes negotiation and constructive interaction between Israelis and Palestinians, people who have bombed each others' school buses and villages, and who, needless to say, have strong reasons for fear, distrust, and not giving each other the time of day. The Sun has rightly recognized the futility of either side trying to intimidate or force its will on the other.
NEWS
November 8, 1998
MEMORIES OF Hurricane Andrew help us appreciate the devastation that Hurricane Mitch left behind in Central America. Andrew was one of the most powerful Atlantic storms of the century when it blew into Dade County, Fla. The 1992 storm killed 14 people and left 40,000 homeless. But that storm's fury does not compare with Mitch's path of death and destruction.The hurricane, later downgraded to a tropical storm, killed at least 9,000 people. Many were buried in mudslides. Another 13,000 people are missing.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1998
It was when the lights started flickering in the small, Spanish-built hospital last Wednesday that Dr. John E. Herzenberg knew Hurricane Mitch had struck the remote Nicaraguan village where he was working."
NEWS
November 17, 1998
Middle East talks should be a model for dealing with IraqThee editorial "Multilateral response to Iraq's provocation" (Nov. 11) exemplifies the adage that it's a lot easier to see what others should do than what we should do ourselves.The Sun regularly promotes negotiation and constructive interaction between Israelis and Palestinians, people who have bombed each others' school buses and villages, and who, needless to say, have strong reasons for fear, distrust, and not giving each other the time of day. The Sun has rightly recognized the futility of either side trying to intimidate or force its will on the other.
NEWS
December 21, 1999
WARMTH and comfort are watchwords of the holiday season. Far from many minds are thoughts of nature's potential savagery. Nature has its way of reminding us, though. Last Wednesday was a momentous day in Venezuela's history. The people, sick of corrupt and vacillating politicians of the supposedly democratic parties, ratified a new constitution that makes President Hugo Chavez a dictator. And while they voted, the rains came, torrents following weeks of rain that had continued past the traditional wet season.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 29, 1998
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- Forget for a minute the shaky science, the cynics, Hurricane Mitch, the threatening meteor shower and even the six cockroaches from Maryland that also will be on board.Today, with the world watching, John Glenn is scheduled to rocket away from Earth for the second time in his illustrious career and return to space as history's oldest astronaut.With blast-off set for 2 p.m., the shuttle Discovery is poised to carry Glenn, the 77-year-old Democratic senator from Ohio, and his six crew mates into orbit for the start of a nine-day mission.
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