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By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 19, 2004
GULF SHORES, Ala. - Joel Nichols slogged through 5 feet of water to see what Hurricane Ivan had done to his home. It wasn't a pretty sight. Pushing his bicycle over the sugary sand of the Alabama coast - 4 feet deep in spots over what a few days earlier had been a five-lane main drag through town - Nichols stepped into the surreal world of Ivan's aftermath. Beach rentals were dumped from their pillars, tumbled on their sides. Air conditioners sat tossed around like dice on some titanic craps table.
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NEWS
January 27, 2006
Meteorology Gulf storm waves reach new heights One of the most astonishing reports from the recent spate of Gulf hurricanes showed wave damage to oil rig structures 80 feet above the water. It was astonishing because the tallest ocean waves ever measured were North Pacific giants about 53 feet from crest to trough -- the height of a five-story building. The Gulf damage was attributed to a freak "rogue" wave. But on Sept. 15, 2004, Hurricane Ivan passed directly over wave and tide buoys deployed 100 miles south of Mobile, Ala. by the Naval Research Laboratory's Stennis Space Center.
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NEWS
By Maya Bell and Maya Bell,ORLANDO SENTINEL | September 10, 2004
KEY LARGO - Tourists and mobile-home residents began fleeing the Florida Keys yesterday as Hurricane Ivan, the third storm to threaten the state in a month, took aim at the fragile island chain and perhaps the mainland as well. The specter of a triple whammy worried Gov. Jeb Bush, who said that, beyond preparation, there was but one thing to do. "We can all pray," he said in Tallahassee. "And I intend to do some praying tonight that it redirects itself." After leaving the tiny spice island of Grenada in ruins, Ivan was on course to pound Jamaica today and pummel Cuba tomorrow.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2005
Tim Troy has a good job, a nice home and an attractive family. Next year, he'll trade it away for long stretches of awful weather, lousy food and no one for company but himself. Troy, 46, has his sights set on "5-Oceans," a global circumnavigation held every four years that bills itself as "the ultimate solo challenge." As many as 20 skippers will take part in the race on 50- and 60-foot high-tech yachts. "I've been trying to do this for almost 15 years," Troy said. "I'm not getting any younger.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Gail Gibson and Ivan Penn and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 17, 2004
PENSACOLA, Fla. - Hurricane Ivan delivered its worst blows yesterday to storm-haunted Florida, brutalizing the state's Panhandle region with widespread flooding, a devastating band of tornadoes and at least 13 deaths. The powerful storm, the third hurricane to hit Florida in five weeks, left residents across the area without electricity, water or phone service. It washed out part of a major bridge along Interstate 10 here and left rescue workers digging through the rubble of tornado-strewn homes, fearing more deaths.
NEWS
By Gary Marx and Gary Marx,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 13, 2004
LA COLOMA, Cuba - Lugging food, clothing and other possessions, residents evacuated this coastal town yesterday as Cubans throughout the western part of the island braced for Hurricane Ivan, a powerful storm that has killed at least 65 people. Yet, while Ivan is expected this afternoon or evening to pound western Cuba, a rural area known for its tobacco production and tourist sites, the storm had veered west and was not likely to make what could have been a catastrophic strike on Havana, the nation's capital.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2004
When Bishop Gordon D. Bennett, one of Baltimore's auxiliary bishops, was recently named to lead a small Roman Catholic diocese in Jamaica, he knew it would be a tough assignment. A 2 1/2 -hour drive from the beaches of Montego Bay, the Diocese of Mandeville lies in a poor, hilly farming area with just 2,700 regularly practicing Catholics. After Hurricane Ivan ripped through Jamaica this month, Bennett's task grew even more challenging. Heavy winds tore the roofs off most of the diocese's churches and schools, knocking out electricity and water.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2004
As a child, Anthony Greenidge of Randallstown would listen in awe to his grandparents' horrific tales of Hurricane Janet, the storm that thrashed his tiny Caribbean island homeland of Grenada in 1955. Enduring days without food or water, his grandparents said the family only barely survived. Greenidge's birth, just a month after the storm hit, was a miracle, according to family lore. Today, no one in his family expected a storm as wicked as Janet to strike again. But it did. "Ivan is 10 times worse," he said.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 16, 2004
LANARK VILLAGE, Fla. - David R. Joliff Sr. almost died when the last hurricane that blew through Florida merely brushed this Panhandle retirement community. But the storm was severe enough to knock out power to his oxygen machine. Fortunately, a deliveryman rushed him a fresh supply. Still, the 63-year-old retired vinyl floor salesman suffered for hours alone in the dark, fearing that he wouldn't be found alive. "When you sit home in the dark by yourself and you don't have oxygen, it's scary," Joliff said.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 16, 2004
MOBILE, Ala. - There won't be any witnesses here. No memories of the howling winds or bending trees, no visions of the flooding, the destruction, the deaths or whatever else they imagine. Hurricane Ivan arrived in southern Alabama last night. That was clear from the television reports, and from the invisible beasts that rattled the metal doors. But the people who most respected Ivan's power - those who followed officials' advice and fled to the concrete-walled safety of the city's high schools and hospitals - will remember only the communal sounds and smells of shelter life, and always the cold, hard floor.
NEWS
March 28, 2005
Security alert shuts part of Cincinnati airport for 2 hours HEBRON, Ky. - Part of Cincinnati's main airport was temporarily shut down yesterday after a passenger passed through a security checkpoint with what appeared to be a gun in a carry-on bag, authorities said. Baggage screeners noticed an X-ray image that resembled a gun after the passenger had picked up the bag and left the checkpoint, said Christopher White, a Transportation Security Administration spokesman in Atlanta. Part of Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport was closed for about two hours as officials searched for the passenger and the weapon.
TRAVEL
By SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 2005
A Memorable Place Island of Grenada steals the heart By Theresa G. Medoff SPECIAL TO THE SUN When I heard the news on the radio, I pulled over and sobbed. Hurricane Ivan had ripped across the lush, mountainous island of Grenada, destroying homes, schools, the parliament building and the nation's only hospital. I tried to imagine the devastation: 90 percent of buildings damaged or destroyed, the people homeless, the economy in tatters. At home later, I compared my vacation photos of the island's colorful harbor with the harbor I saw in news photos from last September - strewn with a jumble of wrecked boats, twisted metal and splintered wood torn from waterfront buildings.
NEWS
September 21, 2004
Malpractice crisis extends beyond a few bad doctors I strongly agree with the main premise of the editorial "To fee or not to fee" (Sept. 14) that the current medical malpractice crisis cannot and should not be solved by imposing a tax (by any other name) on the citizens of Maryland. However, I must take issue with the statement that "Doctors (and their Republican backers) want tort reform; lawyers (and a lot of Democrats) want to see bad doctors put out of business." First, those who support revocation or suspension (with mandatory retraining)
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2004
When Bishop Gordon D. Bennett, one of Baltimore's auxiliary bishops, was recently named to lead a small Roman Catholic diocese in Jamaica, he knew it would be a tough assignment. A 2 1/2 -hour drive from the beaches of Montego Bay, the Diocese of Mandeville lies in a poor, hilly farming area with just 2,700 regularly practicing Catholics. After Hurricane Ivan ripped through Jamaica this month, Bennett's task grew even more challenging. Heavy winds tore the roofs off most of the diocese's churches and schools, knocking out electricity and water.
NEWS
By Ellen Barry and Ellen Barry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 20, 2004
PENSACOLA, Fla. - The readings at Olive Baptist Church yesterday morning were from the Old Testament, verses about the voice of the Lord shaking the wilderness and mountains slipping into the sea. Slowly, during a hymn about shelter, people began to cry. When the pastor told them to kneel and pray, their shoulders began to shake, and men and women sobbed as they finally let go of their emotions, three days after Hurricane Ivan struck. All over this churchgoing city, pastors tried to make sense of the destruction that the storm left behind.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 19, 2004
GULF SHORES, Ala. - Joel Nichols slogged through 5 feet of water to see what Hurricane Ivan had done to his home. It wasn't a pretty sight. Pushing his bicycle over the sugary sand of the Alabama coast - 4 feet deep in spots over what a few days earlier had been a five-lane main drag through town - Nichols stepped into the surreal world of Ivan's aftermath. Beach rentals were dumped from their pillars, tumbled on their sides. Air conditioners sat tossed around like dice on some titanic craps table.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 13, 2004
APALACHICOLA, Fla. - The waters off of this southern spit of the Florida Panhandle already looked a little dark and worried yesterday, days before Hurricane Ivan is projected to deliver its beating. And if the weather's not yet to blame, perhaps the sea is catching a vibe from the wary and storm-weary people who live along its shores. It's not that residents here aren't willing to share the grief borne by their fellow Floridians in the state's southern peninsula, who have already suffered the fury of hurricanes Charley and Frances this season.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson, Robert Little and Ivan Penn and Gail Gibson, Robert Little and Ivan Penn,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 16, 2004
MOBILE, Ala. - Fierce winds and torrential rains hammered the Gulf Coast overnight as Hurricane Ivan barreled ashore with a frightening reach that extended to four southern states and threatened widespread destruction by dawn. As many as 2 million people had been evacuated from parts of Florida, Mississippi, Alabama and Louisiana by late yesterday, leaving towns along 300 miles of coastline all but deserted as streets were turned into rivers, trees were blown down, power was knocked out and homes were wrecked.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 17, 2004
GULF SHORES, Ala. - Sgt. Skip Callaway knew the streets would look like a green snowfall, and that roofs would come off and trees would blow down. He was even prepared to find death the morning after Hurricane Ivan hit his beachfront town. But standing as he was yesterday, at the intersection of Route 59 and Zoo Drive, Callaway still found it hard to contemplate just how much change a storm like Ivan brings. To his right was a crumpled restaurant, one of hundreds of damaged businesses in town.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Gail Gibson and Ivan Penn and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 17, 2004
PENSACOLA, Fla. - Hurricane Ivan delivered its worst blows yesterday to storm-haunted Florida, brutalizing the state's Panhandle region with widespread flooding, a devastating band of tornadoes and at least 13 deaths. The powerful storm, the third hurricane to hit Florida in five weeks, left residents across the area without electricity, water or phone service. It washed out part of a major bridge along Interstate 10 here and left rescue workers digging through the rubble of tornado-strewn homes, fearing more deaths.
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