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Hurricane Isabel

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By SUN STAFF | September 19, 2003
Maryland played the role of a reluctant host yesterday, waiting and watching through a long gray day until Hurricane Isabel announced its arrival with powerful winds and drenching rain. Across the region, people weathered the storm in stride. Annapolis: At the 27th Maryland Renaissance Fair in Annapolis, vendors threw plastic over their wares and checked into motels or stayed with friends - a rare luxury for performers and workers at the medieval show who typically bunk in trailers or unheated booths.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | July 11, 2009
Baltimore County's 20-year-old emergency operations center is slated for a $14 million modernization that will nearly double its space, upgrade its technology, enhance its connections with other jurisdictions and shorten response times. On a recent tour of the center, federal legislators delivered a promise of $3 million to help pay for the renovations. The funds will help the center move from an analog to a digital system with upgraded phones, computers and radios that will expand communications capabilities in emergency situations across the county and into the surrounding region, officials said.
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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
OCEAN CITY - As visitors strolled the boardwalk on a perfect September day, the mayor reluctantly moved to discourage others from coming until after Hurricane Isabel has gone. Mayor James N. Mathias Jr. canceled a huge craft show and most other activities that had been planned for Sunfest, an annual four-day event that usually draws tens of thousands of people. Merchants had hoped it would provide a boost in sales after a lackluster summer season. "We just didn't want to be sitting with 125,000 people here who would typically arrive by Thursday," Mathias said.
NEWS
December 26, 2003
Insurance study sticks taxpayers with useless bill The taxpayers of Baltimore County may be footing an unnecessary $24,000 bill mainly for political accusations ("Insurance chief seeks apology in Balto. County," Dec. 19). The responsiveness claimed by Maryland Insurance Commissioner Alfred W. Redmer Jr. is something that can be verified by the record, although the immensity of the Hurricane Isabel disaster no doubt delayed some responses to those who needed help the most. And I do not understand how Mr. Redmer can reasonably be blamed for any deficiencies in coverage.
NEWS
September 19, 2003
The aftermath of Hurricane Isabel could bring potential health risks and possible financial scams, officials warned yesterday. Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said Marylanders should be aware of fraudulent home repair offers that might surface after the storm. "In many cases, con artists travel state to state, disaster to disaster, looking for victims of storms," he said in a statement. Homeowners who suffer damage should be wary of contractors who solicit door-to-door after a storm, especially those who say they will accept only cash or pressure the homeowner for an immediate decision.
NEWS
By Cyril T. Zaneski and Cyril T. Zaneski,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2003
Officials gathered at the state's emergency operations center last night as Hurricane Isabel rumbled through Maryland were led by a former military man whose name rarely appears in newspapers and whose image rarely appears on television. Donald Keldsen likes it that way. Working in Spartan quarters at the Camp Fretterd Military Reservation in Reisterstown, Keldsen, director of the Maryland Emergency Management Agency, avoids the spotlight, enabling politicians, local officials and technical experts to assume leading roles in relief operations in the wake of disaster.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2003
Under a bright, clear sky yesterday afternoon, the 21-story blue cranes at Seagirt Marine Terminal methodically hoisted cargo onto the container ship Patagonia from one flatbed truck after another. But it's the last ship that will leave the port for two days. In a last-resort effort by the state to keep Hurricane Isabel from harming ships, workers or equipment, the Maryland Port Administration ordered the port of Baltimore closed. The trip up the Chesapeake Bay takes about 12 hours, and officials did not want to risk having ships caught in the narrow confines of the bay where they might strike bridges or risk grounding in 8-foot swells.
FEATURES
By Gerald P. Merrell and Gerald P. Merrell,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2003
Emily Shifrin describes her home as chaotic. It's a description that seems to apply to all aspects of her life these days. Earlier this year, she was confined to 12 weeks of hospital bed care, then gave birth four months ago to premature twin boys. Yesterday, at her family's stone and stucco Tudor Revival in the Stoneleigh neighborhood on the edge of Baltimore County, two dogs barked incessantly, and the sound of hammering shuddered throughout her home as workmen toiled to complete a behind-schedule renovation.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2003
Understand this: Television news loves bad weather. It lives for bad weather. So local stations felt they had a lot to live for yesterday as Hurricane Isabel swept toward Maryland. "It's the perfect television story," said Scott Livingston, news director of WBFF-TV. "You hope no one gets harmed, but you don't know what's going to happen." Stations expanded coverage - adding hours here, brief cut-ins there, with a whole lot of weather maps. News conferences from Mayor Martin O'Malley and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. were given extensive live coverage.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2003
SMITH ISLAND - Kristen Bradshaw wasn't exactly sure what to grab yesterday as she fled her hometown here in the middle of the Chesapeake Bay. But there was one thing she wasn't leaving to chance or to the winds and waves of Hurricane Isabel - her wedding gown. Bradshaw, a 21-year-old island native, has a December wedding date with waterman Bryan Corbin, 24. "After all the time it took me to find the right dress, there was no way I was leaving without it," she said. She was among more than 200 Smith Islanders who boarded the J. Millard Tawes, a state-owned buoy tender and ice-breaker, and a small flotilla of other vessels yesterday to escape the approaching storm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | October 26, 2003
Think of last weekend as the social equivalent of Hurricane Isabel -- too much going on! Let's begin with another beginning, the dedication and ribbon cutting of the Brown Center -- that fantasmo glacier of a building on the Maryland Institute College of Art campus. Did we mention the little soiree surrounding the event? Where 3,500 of MICA's closest friends and students mingled under tents, oohed and aahed over fireworks, then toured that cool new chunk of architectural ice. An evening full of kudos to Eddie and Sylvia Brown for the $6 mil they gave MICA to make the center a reality.
NEWS
October 25, 2003
Q: Do you think Maryland was adequately prepared for Hurricane Isabel? What lessons can we learn from that storm and what should the state do to be ready for future big storms? Hurricane Isabel was too powerful for Maryland. The problems that put Marylanders in the dark for so long are few, but very serious. First, we need to bury our power lines underground so that wind, rain, snow and other weather concerns no longer pose a problem. As a seven-year resident of South Florida and a 32-year resident of Maryland, I can easily see the difference between buried power lines and non-buried lines.
SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey and Laura Vecsey,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2003
Of the many compelling characteristics of the U.S. national women's soccer team - brains, skill, speed, strength, charisma, humor, tenacity - one particular trait has always ultimately defined them. "We want to win. We have a total addiction to winning," said April Heinrichs, a former player and current head coach. It helps to boil things down to the essential element now that the 2003 Women's World Cup is about to begin. The 32-game, 16-team tournament will kick off in Philadelphia today.
NEWS
By Cyril T. Zaneski and Cyril T. Zaneski,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2003
Officials gathered at the state's emergency operations center last night as Hurricane Isabel rumbled through Maryland were led by a former military man whose name rarely appears in newspapers and whose image rarely appears on television. Donald Keldsen likes it that way. Working in Spartan quarters at the Camp Fretterd Military Reservation in Reisterstown, Keldsen, director of the Maryland Emergency Management Agency, avoids the spotlight, enabling politicians, local officials and technical experts to assume leading roles in relief operations in the wake of disaster.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2003
The schoolhouse-turned-shelter where Thomas A. Kirchner spent much of yesterday huddling from the storm was not much to look at. But if the concrete block walls and tile floors of Stemmers Run Middle School lacked the familiarity and comfort of his home, they more than made up for that drabness by providing safety and security amid the storm. "The trailer is practically falling apart," Kirchner, 38, said about his mobile home in Rossville in eastern Baltimore County. "A strong storm might rip it apart and this hurricane would destroy it. I figured it would be better to come here.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 19, 2003
WASHINGTON - Heavy wind and rain blew through all-but-empty streets yesterday as the nation's capital, the federal government having closed, came to a near-standstill. Though the brunt of the storm did not hit until early evening, the capital seemed a ghost town throughout the day, largely because of the Washington Metro's decision to suspend all train and bus service at 11 a.m. Metro's action led to federal officials' decision to shut down the government for the day. The government shutdown will cost about $60 million in lost work and productivity, according to the Office of Management and Budget.
NEWS
By Marego Athans, Jean Marbella and Frank D. Roylance and Marego Athans, Jean Marbella and Frank D. Roylance,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 19, 2003
JACKSONVILLE, N.C. - Hurricane Isabel pinwheeled into North Carolina and Virginia with devastating force early yesterday afternoon, then screamed up the Eastern seaboard, knocking out power for more than 2 million people in those two states alone, ripping the roofs off homes, felling trees, and flooding low-lying areas. The huge storm, covering more than 100,000 square miles, looked like a spiral galaxy in satellite photos as its eye crashed into North Carolina's Outer Banks, its outer ring of clouds sprawled in an arc from Nova Scotia west to southern Quebec, south to Ohio, eastern Kentucky and Tennessee, and east again to South Carolina.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2003
Although many shop owners in Ellicott City weren't around for the flood of 1972, when Tropical Storm Agnes devastated lower Main Street, they've heard the stories. And they aren't taking chances with Hurricane Isabel. Yesterday, many along the flood-prone street began taping and boarding windows with plywood, packing merchandise into boxes and moving them to upper floors. Some rented trucks to whisk thousands of dollars worth of antiques, clothing, jewelry, art and other items to higher ground.
NEWS
September 19, 2003
The aftermath of Hurricane Isabel could bring potential health risks and possible financial scams, officials warned yesterday. Maryland Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr. said Marylanders should be aware of fraudulent home repair offers that might surface after the storm. "In many cases, con artists travel state to state, disaster to disaster, looking for victims of storms," he said in a statement. Homeowners who suffer damage should be wary of contractors who solicit door-to-door after a storm, especially those who say they will accept only cash or pressure the homeowner for an immediate decision.
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