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Hurricane Fran

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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1996
WILMINGTON, N.C. -- Rod Bierstedt, his wife and 13-year-old son fled their house on Wrightsville Beach Thursday and took shelter from Hurricane Fran at a motel in Wilmington.During the night, Fran's winds dropped part of the motel's roof on Bierstedt's two cars. And TV pictures from the beach yesterday morning convinced him he'd lost his house, too."But we're alive," he said.Not everyone fared as well. Of the 17 reported storm-related deaths, 11 were in North Carolina, two in South Carolina and two each in Virginia and West Virginia.
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NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1999
STERLING, Va. -- Barbara Watson took a steamy cup of coffee into the war room of the National Weather Service and stared into a bank of monitors.When she sat down and picked up a phone at 7 a.m., one of her legs began to bounce.Moving pictures of a hurricane had just become a bloody wound over Wilmington, N.C.She thought: Hazel. Andrew. Dennis. Floyd. For a good emergency warning coordinator must think first of past storm surges, disasters and tidal waves.Around the room, conversations with amateur ham radio operators, state and county officials from mid-Atlantic emergency centers, and other weather forecasters hummed.
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1996
WILMINGTON, N.C. -- Osey Sanders knows it takes time and cooperation to pick up after a hurricane.Sanders is a Charleston, S.C., police officer. Since 1989, when his city was ravaged by Hurricane Hugo, he has volunteered for emergency duty after hurricanes in the Virgin Islands.He was in Homestead, Fla., after Hurricane Andrew in 1992, and in Carolina Beach, N.C., after Hurricane Bertha this summer."Hopefully, if Charleston ever gets hit again, we'll be reciprocated in kind," he said.Sanders was one of 40 people from Charleston who arrived in town yesterday to lend a hand as New Hanover County, North Carolina's smallest county and the hardest hit in the latest storm, struggled to get a handle on the damage.
NEWS
By new york times news service | November 17, 1996
BALD HEAD ISLAND, N.C. - Even Hurricane Fran dealt gently with this resort island, a wealthy enclave where sunsets are long and slow and travel is by golf cart.The hurricane, which devastated 120 miles of beaches and many homes farther up the North Carolina coast, merely brushed Bald Head, shaking loose barely a shingle or two.But now a storm of a different kind is buffeting the island, and it is Hurricane Fran that is largely responsible.This lush strand of dunes and maritime forest, the southernmost of North Carolina's barrier islands and perhaps the most exclusive, sought for years to protect its beaches from erosion.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Joe Mathews and Rafael Alvarez and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Jay Apperson, Brenda Buote, Mike Farabaugh, Edward Lee, Howard Libit, Joe Nawrozki, Dennis O'Brien, Andrea F. Siegel and Scott Wilson contributed to this article | September 7, 1996
Remnants of Hurricane Fran caused all sorts of trouble in Maryland yesterday -- from power outages affecting about 90,000 households to school closings and neighborhood evacuations -- as tidal floodwaters rose into the night.No one was reported drowned, injured or missing. Winds topped 40 mph, and flash flood warnings were in effect for most of the state through the weekend.Officials called for a voluntary evacuation of homes along the Chesapeake Bay from Southern Maryland to Anne Arundel County, and sandbags were stacked along City Dock in Annapolis.
NEWS
September 13, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening requested federal disaster aid yesterday for six Maryland counties that sustained severe flood damage in the wake of Hurricane Fran.In a letter to President Clinton, the governor asked that Allegany, Calvert, Charles, Frederick, Garrett and Washington counties be declared major disaster areas.But disaster officials were not optimistic because the damage estimates of $1.4 million to public infrastructure are below the $5 million mark that the Federal Emergency Management Agency generally requires before recommending presidential declarations.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1996
Hurricane Fran and a freak windstorm in Arizona battered USF&G Corp.'s third-quarter results, causing operating income to fall 35 percent, the company said yesterday.Operating income slipped to $31 million, or 22 cents a share, in the quarter ended Sept. 30, compared with $47 million, or 33 cents a share, in the same period a year ago. Net income fell 29 percent to $35 million, compared with the same time a year ago."Without the impact of excess catastrophe losses, our results would have been on target," said USF&G's chairman and chief executive, Norman P. Blake Jr. "Our fundamentals are strong.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | September 5, 1996
Upper Chesapeake Bay: Rockfish action has been very good, with fish to 37 inches taken by chummers at Swann Point Bar and Love Point. Chummers working the deeper areas between the mouth of the Magothy and Baltimore Light also have done well, with catches ranging to 32 inches, according to the Department of Natural Resources. Worton Point and Pooles Island areas have been less productive, but drifted eels still are accounting for stripers over the 18-inch minimum. Trolling has been less effective, but medium-size spoons, parachutes and hose should take fish from channel edges and over bottom humps.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1996
Take three months' worth of normal rainfall, drop it all onto a mountainous watershed in just one weekend, and you get the sort of flooding residents along the Potomac River have suffered from the remnants of Hurricane Fran.The mud-brown, roiling torrents have damaged riverside communities and carried billions of pounds of sediment and nutrients toward the Chesapeake Bay."The stream flows we measured this past weekend are among the highest we've ever seen in the Maryland area," said Robert W. James Jr. of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
NEWS
By new york times news service | November 17, 1996
BALD HEAD ISLAND, N.C. - Even Hurricane Fran dealt gently with this resort island, a wealthy enclave where sunsets are long and slow and travel is by golf cart.The hurricane, which devastated 120 miles of beaches and many homes farther up the North Carolina coast, merely brushed Bald Head, shaking loose barely a shingle or two.But now a storm of a different kind is buffeting the island, and it is Hurricane Fran that is largely responsible.This lush strand of dunes and maritime forest, the southernmost of North Carolina's barrier islands and perhaps the most exclusive, sought for years to protect its beaches from erosion.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1996
Hurricane Fran and a freak windstorm in Arizona battered USF&G Corp.'s third-quarter results, causing operating income to fall 35 percent, the company said yesterday.Operating income slipped to $31 million, or 22 cents a share, in the quarter ended Sept. 30, compared with $47 million, or 33 cents a share, in the same period a year ago. Net income fell 29 percent to $35 million, compared with the same time a year ago."Without the impact of excess catastrophe losses, our results would have been on target," said USF&G's chairman and chief executive, Norman P. Blake Jr. "Our fundamentals are strong.
NEWS
September 13, 1996
Gov. Parris N. Glendening requested federal disaster aid yesterday for six Maryland counties that sustained severe flood damage in the wake of Hurricane Fran.In a letter to President Clinton, the governor asked that Allegany, Calvert, Charles, Frederick, Garrett and Washington counties be declared major disaster areas.But disaster officials were not optimistic because the damage estimates of $1.4 million to public infrastructure are below the $5 million mark that the Federal Emergency Management Agency generally requires before recommending presidential declarations.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1996
Take three months' worth of normal rainfall, drop it all onto a mountainous watershed in just one weekend, and you get the sort of flooding residents along the Potomac River have suffered from the remnants of Hurricane Fran.The mud-brown, roiling torrents have damaged riverside communities and carried billions of pounds of sediment and nutrients toward the Chesapeake Bay."The stream flows we measured this past weekend are among the highest we've ever seen in the Maryland area," said Robert W. James Jr. of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1996
WILMINGTON, N.C. -- Osey Sanders knows it takes time and cooperation to pick up after a hurricane.Sanders is a Charleston, S.C., police officer. Since 1989, when his city was ravaged by Hurricane Hugo, he has volunteered for emergency duty after hurricanes in the Virgin Islands.He was in Homestead, Fla., after Hurricane Andrew in 1992, and in Carolina Beach, N.C., after Hurricane Bertha this summer."Hopefully, if Charleston ever gets hit again, we'll be reciprocated in kind," he said.Sanders was one of 40 people from Charleston who arrived in town yesterday to lend a hand as New Hanover County, North Carolina's smallest county and the hardest hit in the latest storm, struggled to get a handle on the damage.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1996
WILMINGTON, N.C. -- Rod Bierstedt, his wife and 13-year-old son fled their house on Wrightsville Beach Thursday and took shelter from Hurricane Fran at a motel in Wilmington.During the night, Fran's winds dropped part of the motel's roof on Bierstedt's two cars. And TV pictures from the beach yesterday morning convinced him he'd lost his house, too."But we're alive," he said.Not everyone fared as well. Of the 17 reported storm-related deaths, 11 were in North Carolina, two in South Carolina and two each in Virginia and West Virginia.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Joe Mathews and Rafael Alvarez and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Jay Apperson, Brenda Buote, Mike Farabaugh, Edward Lee, Howard Libit, Joe Nawrozki, Dennis O'Brien, Andrea F. Siegel and Scott Wilson contributed to this article | September 7, 1996
Remnants of Hurricane Fran caused all sorts of trouble in Maryland yesterday -- from power outages affecting about 90,000 households to school closings and neighborhood evacuations -- as tidal floodwaters rose into the night.No one was reported drowned, injured or missing. Winds topped 40 mph, and flash flood warnings were in effect for most of the state through the weekend.Officials called for a voluntary evacuation of homes along the Chesapeake Bay from Southern Maryland to Anne Arundel County, and sandbags were stacked along City Dock in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Gary Dorsey and Gary Dorsey,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1999
STERLING, Va. -- Barbara Watson took a steamy cup of coffee into the war room of the National Weather Service and stared into a bank of monitors.When she sat down and picked up a phone at 7 a.m., one of her legs began to bounce.Moving pictures of a hurricane had just become a bloody wound over Wilmington, N.C.She thought: Hazel. Andrew. Dennis. Floyd. For a good emergency warning coordinator must think first of past storm surges, disasters and tidal waves.Around the room, conversations with amateur ham radio operators, state and county officials from mid-Atlantic emergency centers, and other weather forecasters hummed.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 12, 1996
Flooding from the remnants of Hurricane Fran did more than $1.3 million in damage to Maryland roads, bridges and other public structures, a Maryland Emergency Management Agency official said yesterday.The estimates from damage assessment teams will be used by the Glendening administration to support its preliminary request for federal disaster aid for as many as six counties in Western and Southern Maryland.House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. said he asked U.S. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski to convene a summit meeting with federal and state agencies to create long-range strategy against future flooding in Allegany County.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | September 5, 1996
Upper Chesapeake Bay: Rockfish action has been very good, with fish to 37 inches taken by chummers at Swann Point Bar and Love Point. Chummers working the deeper areas between the mouth of the Magothy and Baltimore Light also have done well, with catches ranging to 32 inches, according to the Department of Natural Resources. Worton Point and Pooles Island areas have been less productive, but drifted eels still are accounting for stripers over the 18-inch minimum. Trolling has been less effective, but medium-size spoons, parachutes and hose should take fish from channel edges and over bottom humps.
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