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By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
The National Hurricane Center may loosen the criteria it uses in issuing hurricane warnings so that future storms like Superstorm Sandy would prompt the same alerts as if they were still officially classified as hurricanes, according to AccuWeather.com. The hurricane center has proposed revising its hurricane warning policy to include any storm expected to bring hurricane-force winds, whether the storm is a tropical, sub-tropical, or post-tropical cyclone. Center officials told AccuWeather of the proposal in a meeting Wednesday, according to the Pennsylvania-based meteorology company . Hurricane center officials released the following statement: A proposal was raised during the NOAA Hurricane Conference last week for NWS to have the option to issue hurricane and tropical storm watches and warnings for post-tropical cyclones that threaten life and property.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Tropical Storm Cristobal is following much the same path as Hurricane Bertha took, expected to stay well off the Atlantic coast as it heads north, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm was about 115 miles east-northeast of San Salvador island in the Bahamas and had maximum sustained winds of 60 mph as of 8 a.m. Monday. Cristobal is expected to slowly strengthen over the next couple of days, possibly reaching hurricane status, according to the hurricane center. So far, the cyclone has taken a similar course as Bertha did at the beginning of the month, tracking through the Lesser Antilles, Hispaniola and the Bahamas before heading up north-northeastward well off the East Coast.
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NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | May 30, 1995
When hurricane season starts Thursday, the National Hurricane Center in Coral Gables, Fla., will be trading in experience for technology in predicting where killer storms are heading.After years of waiting, the hurricane center is suddenly awash in new equipment and capability. A weather satellite launched last year is ready for this hurricane season and should give meteorologists more accurate ways to track storms.New supercomputers can do more calculations faster on sophisticated programs that better predict where storms are going based on changing climates.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Bertha, the Atlantic's second named storm of the season, became the second to reach hurricane status as well Monday morning. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 80 mph as of 11 a.m., according to the National Hurricane Center. It was about 230 miles northeast of the Bahamas, and is forecast to pass about midway between the U.S. Atlantic coast and Bermuda, not directly affecting either. The hurricane center forecasts little change in Bertha's strength Monday and most of Tuesday, before the storm is expected to weaken.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | June 2, 1995
MIAMI, Fla. -- The one-story structure with its rooftop row of antennae and satellite dishes may not look that imposing, but don't be fooled by the new National Hurricane Center, probably the safest shelter in South Florida.Dedicated this week to coincide with yesterday's beginning of the 1995 Atlantic hurricane season, the $5 million structure contains 3,000 cubic yards of concrete, enough to build 1 mile of interstate highway.It was designed to withstand 130-mph winds and -- a government brochure says -- a direct hit by a "250-pound projectile at 60 mph."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 8, 2005
MIAMI - Get used to that ominous cloud on the radar screen. Ophelia, which gained a name and tropical storm status yesterday, lurked 80 miles off Cape Canaveral, and forecasters didn't expect it to move far anytime soon. But where it might eventually head remained perplexing. The National Hurricane Center nudged the official track off the north Florida coast into the open Atlantic Ocean, but it cautioned that the only thing forecasters were sure of was that the entire state of Florida, particularly north Florida, ought to keep an eye on Ophelia for four or five days.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Tropical Storm Erin has formed just west of the Cape Verde Islands and is forecast to strengthen as it moves across the Atlantic, at least for a couple of days. The storm was moving at about 15 mph to the west-northwest, with maximum sustained winds of 40 mph, as of about 11 a.m. Thursday, according to the National Hurricane Center. And it is forecast to move into conditions favorable for it to intensify, with moist air and low wind shear, when varying wind speeds at different altitudes, inhibiting storm development.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Sandy is the 77th name to be retired from the World Meteorological Organization's Atlantic hurricane season lists, joining memorable storms to hit Maryland like Irene, Isabel, Gloria and Agnes. Sara will replace it on a list that will next come into use in 2018. The WMO maintains six sets of lists that it rotates through. The organization chooses to change the names on the lists only when a storm is so deadly or costly that reusing its name would be inappropriate or insensitive, according to the National Hurricane Center.
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | May 19, 2007
MIAMI -- The National Weather Service's top leaders announced their departures yesterday, sending more shock waves through an agency roiling from the turmoil stirred up this week by the new director of the National Hurricane Center. The resignation of National Weather Service director David L. Johnson and the retirement of his deputy, John E. Jones Jr., came just two days after hurricane chief Bill Proenza lashed out at his superiors at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for trying to reduce the prominence and cutting the funding of the weather service and hurricane center.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2012
Tropical Storm Isaac is gaining strength and organization just south of the Dominican Republic as of Friday morning, and forecasters are still expecting it to follow a northwestern path into the Gulf of Mexico. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 60 mph as of 11 a.m. The latest track takes it over eastern Haiti and across Cuba as it heads toward making landfall in the U.S. somewhere between New Orleans and southern Florida. The most likely route as forecast this morning takes the storm to the Florida panhandle, though that isn't until early Wednesday, so it could change again.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2014
A rainy system off the coast of Florida could become Tropical Storm Arthur and sweep up the East Coast late this week into the weekend. The National Hurricane Center expects a 60 percent chance that shower and thunderstorm activity over the Bahamas will organize into Tropical Storm Arthur within 48 hours, and 80 percent chances it will do so within the next five days. It's too early for the center to suggest any forecast cone showing any storm's possible trajectory, but forecasting models predict the system being pulled up the coast.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
The National Hurricane Center on Wednesday designated its first area of interest for possible tropical cyclone formation, a gathering of thunderstorms in the Gulf of Mexico. Forecasters called it a "complex low pressure area" in the southern Bay of Campeche, near Mexico's Yucatan peninsula, with disorganized rain showers and thunderstorms. The system is expected to move inland over eastern Mexico by Saturday, but strong upper-level winds are expected to inhibit further development for now. They gave it a 20 percent chance of forming into a tropical cyclone within the next five days.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
A year ago, Hurricane Sandy was imminent, and now 12 months later, signs of recovery from the storm remain in Crisfield and Garrett County. In Crisfield, charity workers will on Monday dedicate the first two houses to be rebuilt since Sandy's winds and storm surge funneled floodwaters across the Eastern Shore town. Garrett County meanwhile is putting the finishing touches on a new emergency operations center that could help coordinate rescue efforts in future storms like Sandy, which dumped up to 3 feet of heavy, wet snow, cutting off power and stranding residents.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
A tropical system over Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula is likely to develop into a tropical storm in the coming days, and it could tread over the same area Hurricane Ingrid drenched last week. The National Hurricane Center estimates a 70 percent chance that the system develops into a tropical cyclone over the next two days. Even if it doesn't strengthen, though, it could be dangerous, the hurricane center warned: "REGARDLESS OF DEVELOPMENT... THIS DISTURBANCE WILL LIKELY SPREAD HEAVY RAINS OVER PORTIONS OF EASTERN MEXICO AND COULD CAUSE LIFE-THREATENING FLOODS AND MUDSLIDES OVER AREAS ALREADY IMPACTED BY TORRENTIAL RAINS DURING THE PAST SEVERAL DAYS.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Tropical Storm Erin has formed just west of the Cape Verde Islands and is forecast to strengthen as it moves across the Atlantic, at least for a couple of days. The storm was moving at about 15 mph to the west-northwest, with maximum sustained winds of 40 mph, as of about 11 a.m. Thursday, according to the National Hurricane Center. And it is forecast to move into conditions favorable for it to intensify, with moist air and low wind shear, when varying wind speeds at different altitudes, inhibiting storm development.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
The season's second tropical depression formed Monday along the Mexican coast, nearly two weeks after Tropical Storm Andrea, but it's uncertain whether it will become Tropical Storm Barry. The system was bringing heavy rains to the Yucatan Peninsula, Belize and Guatemala -- as much as 6-8 inches in some areas by radar estimates, according to the Weather Underground. But it is not highly organized or packing strong winds, with maximum gusts of 30 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.
NEWS
August 27, 2007
Maybe you won't get what Medicare won't pay for. The program plans to stop compensating hospitals for treating the results of preventable errors. Which is a way of saying, really, really stupid mistakes. Caused by really, really stupid or uncaring staffers. Examples: leaving a sponge or scalpel in a patient; administering the wrong blood type, medication or dosage; dropping a patient; or allowing a patient to develop bedsores. Then there's the matter of infections that patients develop thanks to contaminated catheters or ventilators.
NEWS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | September 24, 2002
MEXICO CITY - Hurricane Isidore continued to batter Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula yesterday, leaving at least three people dead, forcing tens of thousands to leave their homes and prompting oil-rig workers to flee platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. The hurricane tore off metal roofs and toppled antennas as it moved inland, where it was downgraded to a tropical storm. As of 4 p.m. local time, the storm was 50 miles south-southeast of Merida, Mexico, and moving northeastward, according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Sandy is the 77th name to be retired from the World Meteorological Organization's Atlantic hurricane season lists, joining memorable storms to hit Maryland like Irene, Isabel, Gloria and Agnes. Sara will replace it on a list that will next come into use in 2018. The WMO maintains six sets of lists that it rotates through. The organization chooses to change the names on the lists only when a storm is so deadly or costly that reusing its name would be inappropriate or insensitive, according to the National Hurricane Center.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
The National Hurricane Center will in the future maintain any necessary hurricane watches or warnings even if a storm is no longer technically a hurricane, as in the case of Superstorm Sandy. Center officials made the changes permanent Friday in light of confusion over alerts issued as Sandy approached in October. The new policy aims to ensure the public is aware of the dangers a storm might pose, regardless of where it fits within meteorological taxonomy. Some criticized the center after Sandy devastated parts of the New Jersey shore, New York and Long Island because a hurricane warning was not issued ahead of the storm.
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