Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHurricane Andrew
IN THE NEWS

Hurricane Andrew

NEWS
October 5, 1992
In the "I can't believe it's here already" department: today is the deadline to register to vote in the Nov. 3 general election. You needn't decide today who you're going to place your faith and hope in, but if you want a voting voice and you're not registered, you must get your application in by 9 p.m. tonight, or mail it today so it will be delivered by 4 p.m. tomorrow.According to the Board of Elections, all county libraries will have registrars in attendance until closing time today to help voters register.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Malcolm Moran and Malcolm Moran,New York Times | October 2, 1992
CORAL GABLES, Fla. -- One by one, the Miami Hurricanes walked out on a soggy practice field yesterday to study the imitation Seminole spear that could change the tenor of what had been a respectful rivalry with Florida State. A flaming spear, thrown into the ground whenever the Seminoles play at home in Tallahassee, has come to symbolize the intensity of a series that holds an annual impact on the national rankings.But the seven-foot stick that the Hurricanes spotted yesterday, the width of a broom handle, was painted red and plunged into the 35-yard line of the offensive unit's field.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff Writer | October 2, 1992
More than a month after Hurricane Andrew devastated communities in southern Florida, Maryland lumber yards and homebuilders are still paying higher prices for plywood and other lumber products -- and wondering whether increased demand is the sole reason.For example, a 4-by-8-foot sheet of plywood that is one-half inch thick sold for about $8.49 before the hurricane. Today, that plywood sells for $9.99, said Fred Grzeskiewicz Jr., Hechinger's wood products buyer.At the same time, local home store retailers -- including Hechinger and Home Depot -- have begun rationing the sale of plywood to protect their regular customers' source of supply.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1992
Stocks open on upward noteThe stock market turned upward today with encouragement from declining interest rates.The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials rose 13.78 points to 3,292.47 in the first half-hour of trading. Gainers outpaced losers by about 5 to 3 in nationwide trading of New York Stock Exchange-listed issues, with 739 up, 422 down and 626 unchanged. Volume on the Big Board came to 26.08 million shares as of 10 a.m. on Wall Street.Interest rates dropped in the bond market today, relieving worries over a recent upswing that lifted yields on long-term Treasury bonds.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1992
Prudential expects big storm tabPrudential Insurance Co., the nation's biggest insurance company, said yesterday that it expects to pay out more than $1 billion in claims for the damage caused by Hurricane Andrew.The estimate was four times larger than it predicted after the devastating storm struck last month, ravaging south Florida and Louisiana.The insurer, based in Newark, N.J., said it expects more than 35,000 claims from policyholders of its Prudential Property and Casualty Insurance Co. subsidiary.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | September 23, 1992
County workers have launched "Reach Out and Build," a charitable effort to collect building materials for victims ravaged by Hurricane Andrew in Iberia Parish, Louisiana."
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | September 18, 1992
The year 1992, with its hurricanes, riots, earthquakes and flooding, has offered up all the subplots of an Irwin Allen disaster movie. It hasn't, however, been a financial disaster for property and casualty insurers. They're more than up to the task, with $160 billion in capital to cover a list of catastrophic losses expected to exceed $14 billion.In fact, some stocks of insurers with large property and casualty businesses have become stronger performers in the wake of Hurricane Andrew. That's based on a belief the hurricane's expensive aftermath will trigger a boost in insurance rates and a long-awaited increase in industry profits.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1992
Stocks continuing to slideThe stock market declined broadly today, extending yesterday's slide as traders reappraised the outlook for interest rates worldwide.The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials dropped 5.14 points to 3,322.18 in the first half hour of trading. Losers outpaced gainers by more than 3 to 1 in nationwide trading of New York Stock Exchange-listed issues. Volume on the Big Board came to 28.91 million shares as of 10 a.m.Production off in AugustIndustrial production fell 0.5 percent in August, the government said today, due in part to the effects of Hurricane Andrew and a strike at a General Motors parts plant.
NEWS
September 12, 1992
Coastal Residents Deserve Flood insuranceIn light of your excellent coverage of the massive response to devastation left by Hurricane Andrew in Florida and Louisiana, I read with great concern the article by Beth Millemann published in the Perspective section Aug. 30. The article described the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) as the "Savings and Loan of the Sea."The first of many major flaws in Ms. Millemann's article is that the catastrophic destruction caused by Hurricane Andrew, upon which she so heavily relies in condemning the NFIP, did not inflict any significant flood damage; and flood damage is why Congress created the NFIP in the first place.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
Military analogies are inevitable.Norman P. Blake Jr., chairman of USF&G Corp., returned from South Florida on Tuesday evening, shaking his head over the destruction he witnessed from the nation's costliest natural disaster. "It's like in a war zone," he said.Mr. Blake's purpose was to review his troops, boost the morale of a few dozen people working under exhausting conditions and meet with customers whose lives have been disrupted. "I walked away from there saying, 'God, the courage and capacity of these people to maintain their dignity,' " he said in an interview this week.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.