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Hurricane Andrew

NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 25, 1993
As the rain keeps falling and the water keeps rising, it is becoming clear that the Great Flood of 1993 will have a considerably bigger effect on the nation's economy than seemed likely just a short time ago."Seems like we get bombarded with heavy rain and heavy rain; in between we get light rain," said Roy R. Arends, a farmer in Alexander, Iowa. "It's been hard to get the crops in, it's hard on equipment, it's hard on nerves. The financial impact is yet to be seen. But right now it really looks bleak."
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NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau | July 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When President Clinton makes his third visit to the Midwest today to inspect flood damage and the federal response, Maryland Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski will be at his side.So, too, will the new head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which is coordinating the government response to the floods and has born the brunt of blistering criticism from Senator Mikulski in the past year.The Baltimore Democrat was not alone in criticizing FEMA for its slow response to Hurricane Andrew in Florida, Hurricane Iniki in Hawaii and the devastation from the riots in Los Angeles.
NEWS
July 16, 1993
If you think those aerial photographs of Des Moines under water were scary and heart-rending, wait till you see Ocean City under water.Coastal engineers, planners, environmentalists, insurers predict that if a major hurricane hits Maryland's beach resort head on, damage will be enormous. Hurricane experts believe a new cycle of heavy activity began last year and will last for perhaps 25 seasons. The odds are pretty good -- or bad -- that a hurricane will hit Middle Atlantic resort areas at least once in that cycle.
NEWS
By Katherine D. Ramirez and Katherine D. Ramirez,Staff Writer | July 16, 1993
Two Maryland Red Cross volunteers left for St. Louis yesterday in a big white rescue truck to help flood victims throughout the Midwest, where at least 22 lives have been lost.Said Columbia's Jeff Pritchard: "This is what I've been trained to do. I'm expected to help people out."Mr. Pritchard, a part-time paid Red Cross employee, and Bunni Martin-Young, currently between jobs in Odenton, will join a team of 17 Marylanders from the Central Maryland chapter of the Red Cross who are already aiding victims of the floods caused by the overflowing Mississippi River.
NEWS
July 15, 1993
Americans associate the fragility of urban life with the great cities on the edges: the New York blackout, the San Francisco earthquake, the Big One coming to Los Angeles. The violence of nature comes from without: the tropical storm roaring toward Florida. The main problem with water is its absence in the great Western desert. What the Middle American corn-belt worries about in midsummer is drought.Water is the earth's most precious commodity. The Mississippi drainage area is a fortunate part of the world.
NEWS
June 3, 1993
JUNE means the beginning of summer, the end of the school year -- and the official onset of another hurricane season. After last year's whopper, Hurricane Andrew, the new season is getting more attention than usual.Robert C. Sheets, director of the National Hurricane Center in Coral Gables, Fla., noted in a recent interview with the Los Angeles Times that Andrew doesn't diminish the chances of a big storm this year. In fact, he said, the statistical probability of a big storm this year is the same as last year.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 27, 1993
No lights. No air conditioning. Husbands and wives cooped up together for days.What to do?Hundreds of Floridians found something to pass the time after Hurricane Andrew. And nine months later, Broward County is greeting Andrew's legacy: a baby boom.Around the county, many hospitals are reporting a surge in births in May, nine months after the storm.While some of the boom stems from the area's expected population growth, many of the extra births are to families who have moved from hard-hit Dade County.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | May 23, 1993
Did self-proclaimed messiah David Koresh force 12-year-old girls to have sex with him?NBC believes inquiring minds want to know. And the network will provide answers with "In the Line of Duty: Ambush at Waco," a made-for-TV docudrama that airs tonight.It's only fitting that a television season swamped with the pseudo-reality of fact-based movies should end with an orgy of such films in the final week.In addition to "Ambush at Waco," NBC will also air "Triumph Over Disaster: The Hurricane Andrew Story" and "Without Warning: Terror in the Towers" tomorrow and Wednesday nights, respectively.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 19, 1993
MIAMI -- Finding a good insurance adjuster after a hurricane i no easy trick. But Wilda Russell found a perfect technique, one effective in times richer or poorer, in sickness and health.She married one."He's like the angel that came out of this horrible mess, my angel from Andrew," says Ms. Russell.Wilda Russell married George Keys on Saturday at Old Cutler Presbyterian Church. "She'll do anything to get her check," Mr. Keys joked.The couple met early in September, in the first weeks after Hurricane Andrew.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Insurance Information Institute Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
The insurance industry could be looking at up to $800 million in claims because of the winter storm that buried much of the eastern United States this past weekend. But officials at local insurers said it's too soon to know how much the damage will add up to.Both USF&G Corp., the state's largest insurer, and Baltimore-based Maryland Casualty Corp. said local agents in areas affected by the storm have not yet called for catastrophe teams of claims adjusters, who race to the scene when disasters overwhelm the companies' local networks.
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