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Hurricane Andrew

BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Stacey Hirsh and Meredith Cohn and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2004
Robert P. Hartwig, Hurricane Charley will go down in history as one of the nation's most damaging storms, costing an estimated $5 billion to $10 billion, but it won't have the wide-reaching impact on insurance providers and consumers that Hurricane Andrew did 12 years ago, experts said. Devastation of this magnitude has not been seen since Andrew struck Florida and other Southern states in 1992 and cost $15.5 billion - or $20.3 billion in current dollars. That storm, the most costly U.S. hurricane, altered the method that insurers use to predict costs.
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NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1998
Home insurance rates will probably be unaffected by damage reported from Hurricane Bonnie, a well-known insurance consumer advocate says."I'm thinking, based on what I've heard, the storm will not raise rates in the country, and probably not in North Carolina," said Bob Hunter, insurance director of the Consumer Federation of America. "The damage is apparently not that great."Virtually agreeing with the assessment was Steven Goldstein, vice president of the Insurance Information Institute of New York, the industry's communication arm."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 24, 1998
SANFORD, Fla. -- Attacking under cover of darkness, the deadliest swarm of tornadoes in state history pummeled Central Florida early yesterday, killing at least 38 and leaving at least 10 people missing last night.The death toll exceeded that of Hurricane Andrew.The El Nino-related twisters, some with winds in excess of 200 mph, sucked people out of their homes, spinning them in the vortex. One teen-ager was blown out of a window, landed 150 feet away in a cow pasture -- and survived to tell the tale.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1997
MIAMI -- In a new setback for Homestead, one of the areas hardest hit by Hurricane Andrew five years ago, the federal government has ordered the city to postpone building an airport on the site of an Air Force installation until an environmental study can determine whether the project would damage the Everglades and protected coastal areas.The study, which is expected to begin next month, will be conducted by the Air Force and the Federal Aviation Administration.The city's plan would use the existing Air Force runway and build a terminal, hangars, warehouses and cargo facilities.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 30, 1997
DISASTER MOVIES ARE back. I watched one on TV, about asteroids slamming into the Earth and causing a devastating worldwide epidemic of bad acting. Also, there are two disaster movies about volcanoes, including one set in Los Angeles, although I doubt that a volcano would faze real L.A. residents, a courageous group of people who think nothing of building luxury homes on steep hillsides made entirely of mud:Mrs. L.A. homeowner: Well, our hillside home is finally done!Mr. L.A. homeowner: Let's go inside!
NEWS
By SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER | September 22, 1996
SAN FRANCISCO - The East Coast insurers fear waves of severe hurricanes that could cost tens of billions of dollars and cripple the insurance industry.Numerous hurricanes assailed the East and Southeast coasts in the 1940s and 1950s, then grew scarce in the 1970s and 1980s. A total of 23 hurricanes reached land in the 1940s, compared with 12 in the 1970s.Now, a new cycle of severe hurricanes may be starting - spurred, perhaps, by increased north African rainfall and other meteorological forces mysteriously linked to hurricane rates.
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1996
HOMESTEAD, Fla. -- Driving out of Miami on the Florida Turnpike, you leave the city behind and enter a kind of twilight zone.It used to be a town of 28,000 people focused on farming and a busy military base. Then Hurricane Andrew blew away most of the houses and stores and flattened Homestead Air Force Base. The population dropped by 12,000 literally overnight. And Homestead that day could have died.From the turnpike you see the giant empty spaces where buildings used to be and fields of what look to be telephone poles, which are the branch-less remains of evergreen and palm trees.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | February 3, 1994
USF&G Corp., the Baltimore-based insurer, yesterday reported sharply higher earnings in the fourth quarter, capping the company's first full year of positive results since 1989.Quarterly earnings of $59 million, or 55 cents a share after paying preferred stock dividends, surpassed most analysts' expectations and compared with $13 million, or 1 cent a share, a year ago. The company's stock reacted strongly, rising $1.50 a share, to close at $15.375, on more than five times its normal daily trading volume.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 16, 1994
MIAMI -- Federal regulators imposed dramatically tougher safety requirements Friday on mobile homes sold in hurricane-vulnerable states, ending months of debate set off by the devastation of Hurricane Andrew.The move largely ignored manufacturers' protests that the new rules would make mobile homes too expensive for the families who need them most.The Manufactured Housing Institute, a manufacturers' lobbying organization, had estimated in June that the proposed rules would raise the average price of a mobile home by as much as 35 percent, from $27,300 to $36,855.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | September 7, 1993
HOMESTEAD, Fla. -- President Clinton defended his stewardship of the U.S. economy in both formal and impromptu forums here yesterday -- thumping the podium in a Labor Day speech and taking rhetorical swings at a heckler while touring communities struck last year by the fury of Hurricane Andrew."
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