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Hurricane Andrew

SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | August 27, 1992
Duper misses practice but makes flightMiami Dolphins wide receiver Mark Duper missed practice yesterday, but he showed up in time to make the team's flight to Baltimore.Duper was not excused from the workout and did not notify the Dolphins he would miss it.Two brothers and his mother have a 19-acre farm in south-central Louisiana, 100 miles west of New Orleans, in the path of Hurricane Andrew. Duper had expressed concern for his family Tuesday.When the Dolphins landed at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, coach Don Shula confirmed that Duper made the flight.
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff Writer | November 20, 1992
To students at Whispering Pines Elementary School in Miami, the 500 students from Hammond Elementary School in North Laurel are heroes.In September, after learning that the Florida school was severely damaged by Hurricane Andrew, Hammond students sent 720 packages of school supplies to Whispering Pines.Thank-you letters from the students have been arriving steadily at Hammond for the past few weeks and have been given a place of honor on a bulletin board in the school lobby."Dear Sammy, I love you for giving us the things.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | September 11, 1992
Military analogies are inevitable.Norman P. Blake Jr., chairman of USF&G Corp., returned from South Florida on Tuesday evening, shaking his head over the destruction he witnessed from the nation's costliest natural disaster. "It's like in a war zone," he said.Mr. Blake's purpose was to review his troops, boost the morale of a few dozen people working under exhausting conditions and meet with customers whose lives have been disrupted. "I walked away from there saying, 'God, the courage and capacity of these people to maintain their dignity,' " he said in an interview this week.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | September 7, 1993
HOMESTEAD, Fla. -- President Clinton defended his stewardship of the U.S. economy in both formal and impromptu forums here yesterday -- thumping the podium in a Labor Day speech and taking rhetorical swings at a heckler while touring communities struck last year by the fury of Hurricane Andrew."
NEWS
By Katherine D. Ramirez and Katherine D. Ramirez,Staff Writer | July 16, 1993
Two Maryland Red Cross volunteers left for St. Louis yesterday in a big white rescue truck to help flood victims throughout the Midwest, where at least 22 lives have been lost.Said Columbia's Jeff Pritchard: "This is what I've been trained to do. I'm expected to help people out."Mr. Pritchard, a part-time paid Red Cross employee, and Bunni Martin-Young, currently between jobs in Odenton, will join a team of 17 Marylanders from the Central Maryland chapter of the Red Cross who are already aiding victims of the floods caused by the overflowing Mississippi River.
NEWS
June 3, 1993
JUNE means the beginning of summer, the end of the school year -- and the official onset of another hurricane season. After last year's whopper, Hurricane Andrew, the new season is getting more attention than usual.Robert C. Sheets, director of the National Hurricane Center in Coral Gables, Fla., noted in a recent interview with the Los Angeles Times that Andrew doesn't diminish the chances of a big storm this year. In fact, he said, the statistical probability of a big storm this year is the same as last year.
BUSINESS
By Chicago Tribune | March 7, 1993
In response to the skyrocketing cost of timber, the National Association of Home Builders is asking President Clinton to convene a summit on forestry issues.The builders' board of directors -- at its convention in Las Vegas two weeks ago -- adopted a policy statement calling on the president and Congress to "develop a comprehensive strategy that acknowledges the nation's need for timber and other natural resources, affordable housing and jobs, as well as the nation's desire to protect the environment and wildlife."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 25, 1993
As the rain keeps falling and the water keeps rising, it is becoming clear that the Great Flood of 1993 will have a considerably bigger effect on the nation's economy than seemed likely just a short time ago."Seems like we get bombarded with heavy rain and heavy rain; in between we get light rain," said Roy R. Arends, a farmer in Alexander, Iowa. "It's been hard to get the crops in, it's hard on equipment, it's hard on nerves. The financial impact is yet to be seen. But right now it really looks bleak."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Siobhan Gorman and Tom Bowman and Siobhan Gorman,Sun reporters | September 20, 2005
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's plan to give the military a larger role in disaster relief faces a number of potential obstacles, according to Pentagon officials and military analysts. Among the hurdles are laws against using active-duty troops for law enforcement, questions about whether the National Guard is overextended because of its responsibilities overseas and decisions about whether to create specialized military units to handle emergencies including natural disasters and terrorist attacks.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau | July 17, 1993
WASHINGTON -- When President Clinton makes his third visit to the Midwest today to inspect flood damage and the federal response, Maryland Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski will be at his side.So, too, will the new head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which is coordinating the government response to the floods and has born the brunt of blistering criticism from Senator Mikulski in the past year.The Baltimore Democrat was not alone in criticizing FEMA for its slow response to Hurricane Andrew in Florida, Hurricane Iniki in Hawaii and the devastation from the riots in Los Angeles.
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