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Hurricane Andrew

NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | August 31, 1992
The warehouse at the BWI Commerce Park stood dark and empty except for few boxes of Rice Krispies, a 6-pack of Lipton tea bags and few bars of Lux soap.Empty boxes were lined up nearby, ready to be filled with food and hauled to South Florida, which was devastated by Hurricane Andrew.Few people had stopped by to donate goods Saturday morning, but officials with TNT Express Worldwide, an international air express company based in Australia, were optimistic that word would spread."We were sitting around on Thursday and saw just awful pictures of people," said Lisa Hogan, the branch manager for the Hanover office.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 24, 1998
SANFORD, Fla. -- Attacking under cover of darkness, the deadliest swarm of tornadoes in state history pummeled Central Florida early yesterday, killing at least 38 and leaving at least 10 people missing last night.The death toll exceeded that of Hurricane Andrew.The El Nino-related twisters, some with winds in excess of 200 mph, sucked people out of their homes, spinning them in the vortex. One teen-ager was blown out of a window, landed 150 feet away in a cow pasture -- and survived to tell the tale.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 2, 1992
Miami -- So I was in my yard, cutting and dragging trees, which is pretty much what I do these days, and I stopped to listen to the battery-powered radio, and the announcer informed me that there were 300 baboons on the loose.And I thought to myself: Of course! Loose baboons! The one inconvenience we have not yet encountered this week!"The baboons are harmless," stated the announcer. "But don't get in their way."And I won't. If the baboons come to our house, they can just go on inside and help themselves to our rotting food and our water with bleach in it.We put bleach in the water because the radio announcer told us to. The theory is, the bleach makes the water taste so awful that nobody will drink it, thereby preventing the spread of disease.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 26, 1997
MIAMI -- In a new setback for Homestead, one of the areas hardest hit by Hurricane Andrew five years ago, the federal government has ordered the city to postpone building an airport on the site of an Air Force installation until an environmental study can determine whether the project would damage the Everglades and protected coastal areas.The study, which is expected to begin next month, will be conducted by the Air Force and the Federal Aviation Administration.The city's plan would use the existing Air Force runway and build a terminal, hangars, warehouses and cargo facilities.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | October 28, 1992
HOMESTEAD, Fla. -- The devastation left in the wake of Hurricane Andrew has been well-documented: 41 people dead, $20 billion in damages, 160,000 people homeless. In light of the human tragedy, the deaths of more than 1,000 horses are merely statistical footnotes.Yet two months after the Aug. 24 storm, residents of the Homestead area still have vivid memories of how horses were caught up in the destruction.Horses fleeing the hurricane ran into canals, drowning by the dozens. Others were killed by flying debris and falling trees.
NEWS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1996
HOMESTEAD, Fla. -- Driving out of Miami on the Florida Turnpike, you leave the city behind and enter a kind of twilight zone.It used to be a town of 28,000 people focused on farming and a busy military base. Then Hurricane Andrew blew away most of the houses and stores and flattened Homestead Air Force Base. The population dropped by 12,000 literally overnight. And Homestead that day could have died.From the turnpike you see the giant empty spaces where buildings used to be and fields of what look to be telephone poles, which are the branch-less remains of evergreen and palm trees.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 26, 1992
Hurricane Andrew has sustained winds of 140 mph. Here is the impact of high winds on the human body, according to Professor Hans Hornung of the California Institute of Technology:* A hand held outside a car window at 70 mph is subjected to one-quarter the force of 140 mph winds.* A person could lean at a 45-degree angle into a 70 mph wind without falling.* It is impossible to walk into an 80 mph wind without support from a hand railing or some other structure.* At 120 mph, a flying object such as a tree limb or lawn chair becomes lethal.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | August 24, 1992
The fury of Hurricane Andrew will be whittled to a whimper by the time the remnants of the storm reach Maryland.In fact, the only evidence of the Hurricane Andrew likely to occur here are possible heavy downpours Wednesday or Thursday, TTC said Bill Miller, a forecaster for the National Weather Service at Baltimore-Washington International Airport."
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | August 7, 2009
The statistical peak of the hurricane season begins next week and runs into October. But we shouldn't read too much into this season's storm-free start. June and July produce fewer than two named storms a year on average. Hurricane Andrew, the first named storm of 1992, formed Aug. 17 and blasted South Florida on the 24th as a Cat. 4 storm, causing tremendous damage.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 25, 1992
Hurricane Andrew is the doing of (A) the Bush administration; (B) the Democratic Congress; or (C) God. If you marked C, your candidate dropped out of the race.Bush and Clinton are preparing a Category 5 campaign with sustained winds above 155 miles an hour.In attacking Hillary Clinton's legal pushiness and causes, leading Republicans have managed to come out in favor of child abuse as a family value.Cal Jr. for President! Ron Shapiro for trade negotiator.
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