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Hurricane Andrew

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NEWS
August 25, 1992
Last spring, experts at the National Hurricane Conference predicted the United States would soon enter a new 25-year cycle of more frequent and more destructive hurricanes. They proved prescient yesterday as the 1992 hurricane season began with one of the most powerful storms to hit a densely-populated metropolitan community in this century.There were relatively few deaths but much destruction in Miami and South Florida. However, Hurricane Andrew is still very much alive -- and exceedingly dangerous.
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NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
Bertha, the Atlantic's second named storm of the season, became the second to reach hurricane status as well Monday morning. The storm had maximum sustained winds of 80 mph as of 11 a.m., according to the National Hurricane Center. It was about 230 miles northeast of the Bahamas, and is forecast to pass about midway between the U.S. Atlantic coast and Bermuda, not directly affecting either. The hurricane center forecasts little change in Bertha's strength Monday and most of Tuesday, before the storm is expected to weaken.
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NEWS
August 27, 1992
Ocean City and Maryland officials (and Delaware officials, too) can learn a lot from Hurricane Andrew. For example, how well were the evacuation plans executed in the Florida Keys and the Miami area and in the New Orleans area? And did what happened there suggest that plans in Baltimore's favorite beach resorts need to be changed?Deaths and even property damage from hurricanes are far less today than in the years before weather forecasting was so sophisticated, and federal, state, local and private emergency operations were so widespread.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2014
A developing El Nino is forecast to suppress tropical storms and hurricanes this summer and fall, contributing to a below-normal storm season, U.S. forecasters said Thursday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts eight to 13 tropical storms will develop in the Atlantic this year, three to six of which will become hurricanes. One or two of those could intensify into what are considered "major" hurricanes. Forecasters urged preparation despite the predictions of a below-average season, citing seasons like 1992, which came at the tail end of an El Nino and brought devastation to Florida with Hurricane Andrew.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | September 3, 1992
Linda Reiser's voice still shakes when she talks about stumbling out of the closet, dazed and wet, after Hurricane Andrew ripped through her home in South Dade County, Fla.For a long while, she just stood and stared at the incredible mess. The sun was shining through part of the ceiling, and the doors and windows were gone. Broken roof tiles, glass shards and piles of insulation littered the floor. An antique curio cabinet was lying next to the uprooted mango trees in the yard.The hurricane had turned the beautiful, two-story home that she and her husband, Raymond, had saved for years to build into a squishy swamp.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 27, 1993
No lights. No air conditioning. Husbands and wives cooped up together for days.What to do?Hundreds of Floridians found something to pass the time after Hurricane Andrew. And nine months later, Broward County is greeting Andrew's legacy: a baby boom.Around the county, many hospitals are reporting a surge in births in May, nine months after the storm.While some of the boom stems from the area's expected population growth, many of the extra births are to families who have moved from hard-hit Dade County.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | May 19, 1993
MIAMI -- Finding a good insurance adjuster after a hurricane i no easy trick. But Wilda Russell found a perfect technique, one effective in times richer or poorer, in sickness and health.She married one."He's like the angel that came out of this horrible mess, my angel from Andrew," says Ms. Russell.Wilda Russell married George Keys on Saturday at Old Cutler Presbyterian Church. "She'll do anything to get her check," Mr. Keys joked.The couple met early in September, in the first weeks after Hurricane Andrew.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | September 2, 1992
Howard County residents are responding in their own ways to help Hurricane Andrew victims in Florida. While some offer prayers during church services, others are collecting and asking for donations at work.Several local businesses, meanwhile, are pooling their resources and banking on the goodwill of residents to send truckloads of food, clothing and other items to South Florida.Brickhouse Farm Water Co., a 2-week-old business near Clarksville, sent more than 5,000 gallons of bottled water yesterday to a Red Cross distribution center in Miami.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer fTC | August 26, 1992
Freshman Debbie Aaronson didn't know the meaning of her school's nickname,the "Hurricanes," until she arrived at the University of Miami and Hurricane Andrew hit.The 18-year-old Columbia resident moved into her dorm in Coral Gables the day before the storm rumbled through Miami, killing 10 people, leaving 50,000 others homeless and was estimated to cause up to $20 billion damage.The storm did no damage to her dorm, but it destroyed the Holiday Inn where her parents had stayed two days earlier, and toppled radar towers off the National Hurricane Center just a mile away.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | August 28, 1992
CBS had a soggy Dan Rather in Florida and Louisiana for three days anchoring its coverage. NBC did not think it was worth calling Tom Brokaw in from vacation.Hurricane Andrew was a huge story, a very big story or only a pretty big one depending on which of the traditional networks you watched this week.Not too surprisingly the network assessments of Andrew yesterday, after the storm had spent itself, coincided with the commitment each had made earlier in the week to covering it."I think there were differences in the coverage among the networks," said Steve Friedman, the executive producer of "NBC Nightly News With Tom Brokaw."
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | August 7, 2009
The statistical peak of the hurricane season begins next week and runs into October. But we shouldn't read too much into this season's storm-free start. June and July produce fewer than two named storms a year on average. Hurricane Andrew, the first named storm of 1992, formed Aug. 17 and blasted South Florida on the 24th as a Cat. 4 storm, causing tremendous damage.
BUSINESS
By Marilyn Geewax and Marilyn Geewax,Cox News Service | September 12, 2006
BOSTON -- When terrorists slammed planes into the World Trade Center in New York five years ago, the National Association for Business Economics was there, holding its annual convention. Yesterday, when the same group met here, its members marveled at the resilience that the U.S. economy has demonstrated since that blue-sky morning when they ran outside into a hard rain of debris from the flaming tower above. U.S. consumers "got over it more quickly than I thought" at the time they would, said David Wyss, chief economist for Standard & Poor's in New York.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Siobhan Gorman and Tom Bowman and Siobhan Gorman,Sun reporters | September 20, 2005
WASHINGTON -- President Bush's plan to give the military a larger role in disaster relief faces a number of potential obstacles, according to Pentagon officials and military analysts. Among the hurdles are laws against using active-duty troops for law enforcement, questions about whether the National Guard is overextended because of its responsibilities overseas and decisions about whether to create specialized military units to handle emergencies including natural disasters and terrorist attacks.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2005
The future cost of homeowner insurance hangs in the balance as the damage tally from Hurricane Katrina crystallizes, but industry experts remain optimistic that any widespread rate increases will be nominal. Coastal Maryland is distant enough from the most hurricane-prone places to avoid significant leaps in homeowner coverage that might smack other coastal areas. But Maryland residents who own property in Florida or Louisiana, or other high-risk areas, should watch for those premiums to jump as much as 10 percent or 15 percent, some experts warn.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 15, 2005
BILOXI, Miss. - Hurricane Katrina damaged or demolished nearly half a million homes in three states, the American Red Cross said yesterday - four times as many as Hurricane Andrew did when it hit South Florida in 1992. As President Bush prepared to speak to the nation from an undisclosed location in the disaster zone at 9 tonight, environmental and fiscal challenges continued to mount along the Gulf Coast, and Louisiana launched a massive investigation of health-care facilities where patients who weren't evacuated died after the storm.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2005
Oil rigs washing up on beaches. Casinos ripped from their moorings. Refineries closed. Shipping facilities damaged or destroyed. Small businesses flooded and then looted. Hurricane Katrina - which wrought damage that appears to be worse than anything the nation has seen before - hit the Gulf Coast in such critical spots that it's not simply homes that must be rebuilt, but the region's economy. Including stemming the floods, cleaning debris, and restoring power and telecommunications, much must be done before businesses can even think about rebuilding, let alone reopening.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | October 28, 1992
HOMESTEAD, Fla. -- The devastation left in the wake of Hurricane Andrew has been well-documented: 41 people dead, $20 billion in damages, 160,000 people homeless. In light of the human tragedy, the deaths of more than 1,000 horses are merely statistical footnotes.Yet two months after the Aug. 24 storm, residents of the Homestead area still have vivid memories of how horses were caught up in the destruction.Horses fleeing the hurricane ran into canals, drowning by the dozens. Others were killed by flying debris and falling trees.
BUSINESS
By Diane Levick and Diane Levick,THE HARTFORD COURANT | August 31, 2005
A day after Hurricane Katrina smashed the Gulf Coast, insurers were still unable to tally the property damage, but they expect to pay billions in claims just from delays that keep customers from returning to homes and businesses. Estimates on the industry's total cost of the storm ranged from $9 billion to $25 billion yesterday, based on computer modeling firms' assessments of Katrina's path, wind speed and amount of insured property. Only one of the firms - AIR Worldwide in Boston - revised its estimates from Monday.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2004
When hurricanes start stalking America's Southeast coast, David Prevatt hopes that they hit one of his houses. Not one that the Clemson University engineer lives in, but one of the many he has wired from South Carolina to the panhandle of Florida to measure the stresses they face from extraordinarily high winds. Prevatt said that he takes no joy in the destruction and discomfort that these storms cause, but he cannot hide his pleasure when he records direct hits, as he did when Frances struck Florida on Sept.
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