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NEWS
September 29, 1991
The Huntington Library of San Marino, Calif., ended a 39-year scholarly scandal and struck a blow for freedom of information by making the Dead Sea Scrolls available, on microfilm through other libraries, to all scholars who ask. About time.The monopoly stewardship by a handful of editors -- as though they own copyright on stuff written 2,000 years ago -- is broken. The Huntington Library, a respected research institute, may have acted from a legal gray area, based on the disputed right of the donor to give it negatives without restrictions.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | January 25, 2010
At the entrance to the Towson Library, visitors encounter a life-size photograph of Abraham Lincoln - familiar with his towering height and black attire, but unusual because he is clean-shaven and his eyes are stark blue. The photo is the first of many in a multipanel exhibit that focuses on the 16th president and his struggles with slavery and the Civil War. The library opened the traveling exhibit, "Forever Free: Abraham Lincoln's Journey to Emancipation," Thursday, and the staff has put together books, documentaries and Lincoln memorabilia to accompany it - including a collection of Civil War-era artifacts on loan from the Baltimore County Historical Society and a trunk borrowed from the Gettysburg National Military Park and filled with relics of 19th-century military life.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 23, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Israel is warning the Huntington Library not to release the institution's photographic record of the Dead Sea Scrolls, hinting at possible legal action if the library breaks the decades-long convention that has kept the ancient Jewish documents under the control of a small group of scholars.Huntington Library officials, however, responded defiantly, saying they have no intention of changing their plans and planned to open the collection without restriction to scholars beginning today.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2010
At the entrance to the Towson Library, visitors encounter a life-size photograph of Abraham Lincoln - familiar with his towering height and black attire, but unusual because he is clean-shaven and his eyes are stark blue. The photo is the first of many in a multipanel exhibit that focuses on the 16th president and his struggles with slavery and the Civil War. The library opened the traveling exhibit, "Forever Free: Abraham Lincoln's Journey to Emancipation," Thursday, and the staff has put together books, documentaries and Lincoln memorabilia to accompany it - including a collection of Civil War-era artifacts on loan from the Baltimore County Historical Society and a trunk borrowed from the Gettysburg National Military Park and filled with relics of 19th-century military life.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 23, 1991
JERUSALEM -- Government officials in charge of Israeli antiquities warned a major U.S. library yesterday against going ahead with a decision to make photographs of the Dead Sea Scrolls available to all researchers without restriction.The Israelis said that the Huntington Library in San Marino, Calif., would be violating long-standing agreements if it carried out its plan.But within hours of the warning, the library opened the collection, declaring its action a blow for academic freedom.Earlier in the day, the Israelis charged that the move would set off a stampede by scholars that could prevent a "definitive interpretation" of the ancient documents from emerging.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | January 25, 2010
At the entrance to the Towson Library, visitors encounter a life-size photograph of Abraham Lincoln - familiar with his towering height and black attire, but unusual because he is clean-shaven and his eyes are stark blue. The photo is the first of many in a multipanel exhibit that focuses on the 16th president and his struggles with slavery and the Civil War. The library opened the traveling exhibit, "Forever Free: Abraham Lincoln's Journey to Emancipation," Thursday, and the staff has put together books, documentaries and Lincoln memorabilia to accompany it - including a collection of Civil War-era artifacts on loan from the Baltimore County Historical Society and a trunk borrowed from the Gettysburg National Military Park and filled with relics of 19th-century military life.
NEWS
By William Safire | September 27, 1991
Pasadena, Calif. -- A LITTLE band of willful academics, representing no interest but their own arrogant selfishness, have for 40 years kept clutched to their scholastic bosoms a substantial portion of the Dead Sea Scrolls.These treasures are the ancient documents found in a West Bank cave that cast light on the religious politics roiling the world between 200 B.C. and a century after the birth of Christ.The Kingdom of Jordan first made a deal with a tight coterie of scholars to decipher and publish the precious texts; after the 1967 war, the government of Israel went along with this cozy arrangement, which meant that the non-biblical portions of the scrolls would be dribbled out by the favored academics over a period of decades.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2010
At the entrance to the Towson Library, visitors encounter a life-size photograph of Abraham Lincoln - familiar with his towering height and black attire, but unusual because he is clean-shaven and his eyes are stark blue. The photo is the first of many in a multipanel exhibit that focuses on the 16th president and his struggles with slavery and the Civil War. The library opened the traveling exhibit, "Forever Free: Abraham Lincoln's Journey to Emancipation," Thursday, and the staff has put together books, documentaries and Lincoln memorabilia to accompany it - including a collection of Civil War-era artifacts on loan from the Baltimore County Historical Society and a trunk borrowed from the Gettysburg National Military Park and filled with relics of 19th-century military life.
NEWS
February 23, 1995
William Moffett, 62, the Huntington Library director who opened scholarly access to the Dead Sea Scrolls photographic archive, died of cancer Monday in San Marino, Calif. He focused international attention on the Huntington in 1991 when he eased access to the Dead Sea Scrolls photographs, ending a 40-year monopoly held by a small number of researchers. He was selected librarian of the year in 1993 by the Association of College and Research Libraries. That year, he received the American Library Association's Immroth Memorial Award for Intellectual Freedom and the Special Libraries Association's Professional Librarian of 1993 award.
NEWS
February 24, 1995
William P. Harsh, 83, a former president of the American Royal Association horse and livestock show and retired executive of Hallmark Cards Inc., died Sunday in Kansas City, Mo. He headed the horse and livestock show in the 1970s. An exhibition hall at the American Royal complex is named in his honor.William Moffett, 62, the Huntington Library director who opened scholarly access to the Dead Sea Scrolls photographic archive, died of cancer Monday in San Marino, Calif. In 1993, he received the American Library Association's Immroth Memorial Award for Intellectual Freedom and the Special Libraries Association's Professional Librarian of 1993 award.
NEWS
September 29, 1991
The Huntington Library of San Marino, Calif., ended a 39-year scholarly scandal and struck a blow for freedom of information by making the Dead Sea Scrolls available, on microfilm through other libraries, to all scholars who ask. About time.The monopoly stewardship by a handful of editors -- as though they own copyright on stuff written 2,000 years ago -- is broken. The Huntington Library, a respected research institute, may have acted from a legal gray area, based on the disputed right of the donor to give it negatives without restrictions.
NEWS
By William Safire | September 27, 1991
Pasadena, Calif. -- A LITTLE band of willful academics, representing no interest but their own arrogant selfishness, have for 40 years kept clutched to their scholastic bosoms a substantial portion of the Dead Sea Scrolls.These treasures are the ancient documents found in a West Bank cave that cast light on the religious politics roiling the world between 200 B.C. and a century after the birth of Christ.The Kingdom of Jordan first made a deal with a tight coterie of scholars to decipher and publish the precious texts; after the 1967 war, the government of Israel went along with this cozy arrangement, which meant that the non-biblical portions of the scrolls would be dribbled out by the favored academics over a period of decades.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 23, 1991
JERUSALEM -- Government officials in charge of Israeli antiquities warned a major U.S. library yesterday against going ahead with a decision to make photographs of the Dead Sea Scrolls available to all researchers without restriction.The Israelis said that the Huntington Library in San Marino, Calif., would be violating long-standing agreements if it carried out its plan.But within hours of the warning, the library opened the collection, declaring its action a blow for academic freedom.Earlier in the day, the Israelis charged that the move would set off a stampede by scholars that could prevent a "definitive interpretation" of the ancient documents from emerging.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 23, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Israel is warning the Huntington Library not to release the institution's photographic record of the Dead Sea Scrolls, hinting at possible legal action if the library breaks the decades-long convention that has kept the ancient Jewish documents under the control of a small group of scholars.Huntington Library officials, however, responded defiantly, saying they have no intention of changing their plans and planned to open the collection without restriction to scholars beginning today.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | February 5, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- The fabled lost city of Ubar, celebrated in both the Koran and "The Arabian Nights" as the queen of the lucrative frankincense trade for 3,000 years before the birth of Christ, has been discovered by a Los Angeles-based team of amateur and professional archaeologists.Using a combination of high-tech satellite imagery and old-fashioned literary detective work, they discovered the fortress city buried under the shifting sands of a section of Oman so barren that it is known as the Rub'al Khali or Empty Quarter.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1999
A surge of emotion swept over the young Jewish soldier from Baltimore when he first took in his hands the original set of Nazi Germany's infamous Nuremberg Laws."
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