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NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | December 10, 2000
YOU COULD tell that deer season had arrived. That is to say, "modern firearms" hunting season, to be more precise. There were a half-dozen of them nonchalantly lazing in the shrubbery next to the swing set last Sunday. Deer, I mean, not hunters. They ignored the half-hearted barking of the dog on the line, the faithful guardian of the homestead who has become all too familiar with the sangfroid of the unconcerned ungulates. Me? I sprinkled more blood meal around the flower garden and plonked half-bars of fragrant Irish Spring soap on wooden stakes, in the talismanic hope of warding off the cervine evil spirits.
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SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | September 6, 2014
Archery hunting for white-tailed deer opened statewide Friday and continues through Jan. 31. New this year, hunters in Region A may take only two antlerless deer for the license year. Also new, a hunter may not harvest more than two white-tailed deer within the yearly bag limit that have two or fewer points on each antler present. Any additional antlered deer taken within the legal seasons and bag limits must have at least three points on one antler. Junior Hunting License holders are exempt from the antler point restriction.
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SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | October 21, 1990
Every hunting season, there are new wrinkles in the regulations that govern and protect the hunters and the hunted.This year in the Guide to Hunting and Trapping in Maryland, more than a dozen new wrinkles are listed, ranging from major changes in the hunter orange regulations to changes in the lottery for deer firearms season permits at Hugg-Thomas Wildlife Management Area, Hanover Watershed and the Cooperative WMAs.As of July 1, 1990, the following hunters are exempt from wearing hunter orange, a color used to mark humans because it does not exist in nature:* A person who hunts any wildlife on that person's property with or without a hunting license.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
As a Maryland citizen who enjoys the autumn sailing season best of all, I thought people should consider that the hunting season affects those of us navigating the tributaries of the Chesapeake as well ("Blue laws fade, Sunday hunt proceeds," April 8). Hunting blinds are all along the Eastern Shore waterways, and if the ban on Sunday hunting is lifted it will mean that my peaceful sailing days in the fall are over. Virginia Kerr, Chestertown - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
January 21, 2007
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Patuxent Research Refuge in Laurel is ending its hunting season about two weeks earlier than scheduled. The season was to continue until Jan. 31. Small-game hunting, deer-archery hunting, a restricted hunt by youths and a half-day restricted firearm hunt are affected. Administrative, management, public safety and law enforcement concerns are the reasons for the early closure. The refuge plans to offer opportunities for hunting in the fall. Information: http:--patuxent.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | November 26, 1995
Two people were shot yesterday on the first day of Maryland's hunting season, including a Glen Burnie man who was accidentally shot by his grandson, spokesmen for the Department of Natural Resources said.James G. Jarvis, 59, of the 1900 block of Norwich Road, was hunting with his family at about 6:30 a.m. yesterday near a gravel pit in Odenton when he stepped in front of a 12-gauge shotgun blast fired by the 14-year-old boy.In the other accident, a stray bullet likely fired by a hunter pierced the walls of a Middletown home and struck a 4-year-old boy in the arm, said Cpl. Robert Taylor of the Maryland Natural Resources Police.
NEWS
November 12, 1995
THE RECOVERY of the black bear in Western Maryland's mountain woodlands is a bona fide success story for wildlife management. It's also a horror story for some residents who share their habitat with the bears, which have become increasingly comfortable with human surroundings.That's a potentially dangerous familiarity, when these large, wild creatures appropriate porches and driveways, feast on cornfields and livestock, forage garbage cans and bird feeders.While there's no documented bear attack on a human in Maryland in modern times, the close encounters appear on the rise with the expansion of development in Garrett and Allegany counties and the growth of the state's bear population, estimated at 200 animals.
NEWS
By Michael Markarian | October 31, 2003
IN THE past 50 years, much has changed in Maryland. But one thing has remained the same - the state's small population of black bears has been protected from trophy hunting. This may soon change, as Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and the Department of Natural Resources have just proposed a bear hunting season for 2004. A bear hunt, however, would provide no relief to the citizens in Western Maryland who want concrete solutions to bear conflicts. It may be psychologically soothing, but shooting bears at random does not target the individual bears causing problems and does not address conflicts with surviving bears.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2003
After months of debate over the fate of the state's beautiful but annoying mute swans, Maryland officials are proposing for the first time a hunting season to keep their numbers down. The state Department of Natural Resources recommends in a letter to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials that hunters control mute swan populations in the years ahead after state biologists and technicians shoot up to 1,500 of the birds. DNR officials are seeking a federal permit to kill almost half of the state's 3,600 mute swans.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2000
Bear hunting, illegal in Maryland since 1953, will remain so at least for another two seasons. Sarah Taylor-Rogers, secretary of the Department of Natural Resources, announced yesterday that she has rejected a request from the state's hunters to open a limited season. The black bear population has been growing in Western Maryland, and with it the number of complaints from rural residents and farmers. The Maryland Sportsmen's Association this spring asked for a two-day hunt, with participants chosen by lottery, to reduce the population.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
The deer hunting archery season began in Maryland on Friday, Sept. 6, and will run through Jan. 31. There are two seasons for muzzleloading: an early mid-October (Oct. 17-19) and a late season from Dec. 21 to Jan. 4. The firearm season will run from Nov. 30 to Dec. 14 and again in Region B only Jan. 10-11. The statewide bag limit allows hunters one antlered whitetail deer per season, with a bonus antlered deer allowed in Region B in the season of the hunter's choice. There is also an unlimited number of antlerless deer allowed taken in Region B with archery equipment, and hunters can take up to 10 antlerless deer in each of the other seasons.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2012
Hindered by cold, wet and windy weather at the start of the state's two-week firearm deer hunting season, as well as an abundance of acorns, fewer deer were taken this year, according to the Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Though hunters took more than 36,000 deer during the two-week firearm season that ended Dec. 8, there was a nearly 20percent drop in the state's most populous region and a 12 percent drop throughout the rest of the state. Brian Eyler, deer project leader for the DNR, said last month that officials hoped for a harvest of between 40,000 and 50,000 of the state's minimum estimated population of about 230,000 deer.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2012
Maryland's annual bear hunt will begin Oct. 22 with more hunters and the highest quota of bears allowed killed since the hunt was reinstituted after a 50-year hiatus in 2004. According to Harry Spiker, the bear biologist who runs the hunt for the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 340 hunters have been issued tags with a quota set between 80 and 100 bears. After setting a quota of between 55 and 80 bears last year, a total of 72 were killed. The number of hunters has increased from 260 in 2011.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2012
A number of hunting regulation changes are being considered by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources Wildlife and Heritage Service as a result of receiving more than 1,000 comments at stakeholder meetings, public hearings and online forums. The changes, which would go into effect this fall for two years, have been endorsed by the Maryland Wildlife Advisory Commission. The proposals include extending the archery season for white-tailed and sika deer, as well as the fox hunting season, and reopening the river otter season in Allegany and Garrett counties.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2011
For those venturing out on the first day of firearm hunting season Sunday, where you shoot from is as important to safety as the weapons of choice. According to George F. Johnson IV, superintendent colonel for the Department of Natural Resources, "tree-stand incidents account for most hunting accidents. " Johnson and others suggest hunters use a full-body safety harness to keep them tethered to the tree. Broken or worn equipment should be replaced or fixed before hunters climb into the stand.
NEWS
By Baltimore Sun staff | October 30, 2010
The state Department of Natural Resources says Maryland's bear hunt is closed after 67 kills in five days. The seventh annual black bear hunting season, which opened Monday in Allegany and Garrett counties, was officially closed at 9 p.m. Friday. "The 2010 bear hunt was another unqualified success," Harry Spiker, Game Mammal Section Leader for the department's Wildlife and Heritage Service, said in a release. "Unseasonably mild weather made the first part of the season a challenge and kept hunter success low. Despite marginal conditions we safely reached another harvest quota while allowing the first five-day bear hunt in Maryland history.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1995
LITTLE ORLEANS -- Ed Harmon arrived at Green Ridge State Forest from Pasadena well before noon yesterday, parked his 25-foot camper along the slope of a snow-dusted ridge, and waited.The 40-year-old corrections officer was looking for his buddies from the Baltimore area to show up with their hunting and camping gear -- and even their children -- to help perpetuate a tradition that, for some, goes back generations: hunting at Green Ridge State Forest.The opening of Maryland's firearms hunting season today will attract about 3,000 hunters to the 38,811-acre forest in Allegany County and transform the usually serene woods into bustling villages of tents and campers -- "tent cities," as park rangers call them.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | November 3, 1996
Hoping to ambush an unsuspecting deer, Chris McAvinue perched precariously in an oak tree as darkness became dawn.The distant drone of traffic from Interstate 83 penetrated the dense woods of Gunpowder Falls State Park in northern Baltimore County. Pulley-aided compound bow in hand, McAvinue stood almost statue-still, peering slowly about for his quarry.For most Marylanders, autumn is a season of colorful foliage, falling leaves and migrating waterfowl. But for thousands of outdoors enthusiasts, it is also hunting season, a chance to get into the woods, to fight off cold, sleep and boredom and maybe bag a deer.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2010
— After her mother died of cancer "too young" and her father was diagnosed with the disease, Leslie Nightingale sat down and wrote her bucket list. Take a cruise, ride in a hot-air balloon, go skydiving, finish her master's degree, shoot a bear. "You just never know what's going to happen and when it's going to happen," said Nightingale, 39, explaining the list. "Life's too short to hesitate. " On Monday she checked off the first of the items, shooting a 234-pound black bear during the opening minutes of Maryland's season.
NEWS
By Capital News Service | November 23, 2007
Wildlife officials expect deer kills to be about average during the firearm season that begins tomorrow, traditionally one of the busiest hunting days of the year. Bow and muzzleloader deer kills this year were down 19 percent from last year for a variety of reasons, but Brian Eyler, deer project leader at the Department of Natural Resources, said he expects that to turn around during the firearm season, which runs through Dec. 8. That's already happening, some hunters reported. The season "started out a little bit slower than average but looks to be pretty good," said Randy Roof of Chesapeake Outdoors on Kent Island.
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