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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2000
LAS VEGAS - Hunt Valley Mall will become Hunt Valley Centre, a hybrid, two-level "power center" with a mix of big box stores, specialty shops and restaurants. Retail developer Starwood Ceruzzi, the struggling mall's new owner, unveiled plans for a $40 million makeover at the International Council of Shopping Centers convention here, giving potential tenants a first glimpse of the project. The Connecticut-based developer bought the North Baltimore County center about a month ago from Equitable Life Assurance Society.
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EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | October 18, 2012
The American shopping experience changed in the second half of the 1900s from one where customers made their way to free-standing stores ranging from ma and pa operations to department stores to one where customers converged on a single destination, that being a mall with an enclosed and largely climate controlled common area surrounded by outlets selling just about anything. Harford Mall was among the early such facilities, given its relatively rural location when it opened 40 years ago in 1972 at the site of what had been a horse racetrack and county fairgrounds.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2000
The Connecticut-based developer buying Hunt Valley Mall has built a reputation recycling obsolete shopping centers in the Northeast. Now Starwood Ceruzzi is moving into the mid-Atlantic and says it sees plenty of potential for its brand of "big box" retailing in Maryland. A year after opening a regional office in Bethesda, the developer has four high-profile Maryland projects in the works. Starwood Ceruzzi expects to close a deal this week to buy Hunt Valley Mall, which has languished half-empty for years.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2010
The owner of the movie theater complex at Hunt Valley Towne Center is selling the building, where Regal Cinemas will continue to operate the 12-screen cinema under a long-term lease, the real estate broker handling the sale said Tuesday. The cinema, built in 1998 and owned separately from the rest of the outdoor mall in Hunt Valley, is expected to sell for about $10 million, said James Murphy, executive managing director for Colliers International in New York. Murphy identified the owner as a Connecticut-based institution, which also is selling a movie theater it owns in the Potomac Yard Shopping Center in Alexandria, Va. "These are very successful theaters in the Regal chain," Murphy said.
NEWS
By Anne Lauren Henslee and Anne Lauren Henslee,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2004
Six years ago, the Avenue at White Marsh introduced consumers to a non-mall retail experience with a 4,000-seat multiplex theater in a one-street village of restaurants and stores. The project has exceeded all projections, bringing in more than 1.5 million customers annually and serving as a focal point for a burgeoning community. Now developers are banking on creating a similar buzz in Hunt Valley. Open-air shopping centers, also referred to as Main Street or lifestyle centers, are giving retail developers and consumers a new option, according to Anita Kramer, director of retail development for the Urban Land Institute in Washington.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
A Pennsylvania-based commercial developer has become the top landlord of Class A office buildings in Hunt Valley with the purchase of three buildings, including the former offices of PHH Arval's fleet-management business. Liberty Property Trust, based in Malvern, Pa., said yesterday that it bought three buildings just west of Hunt Valley Mall on International Circle for $22.7 million from financial service provider TIAA-CREF, a group of companies that includes Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2010
The owner of the movie theater complex at Hunt Valley Towne Center is selling the building, where Regal Cinemas will continue to operate the 12-screen cinema under a long-term lease, the real estate broker handling the sale said Tuesday. The cinema, built in 1998 and owned separately from the rest of the outdoor mall in Hunt Valley, is expected to sell for about $10 million, said James Murphy, executive managing director for Colliers International in New York. Murphy identified the owner as a Connecticut-based institution, which also is selling a movie theater it owns in the Potomac Yard Shopping Center in Alexandria, Va. "These are very successful theaters in the Regal chain," Murphy said.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
The developers of Hunt Valley Towne Centre said yesterday that they have signed nearly two dozen new tenants and that the first stores and restaurants will begin opening at the end of the month. Greenberg Commercial, which is redeveloping the center from a depressed enclosed mall to an open-air "Main Street" style market, said the new tenants have leased 90,000 square feet and include national chains and well-known local companies. The first stores will open this month in four free-standing buildings near the front of the mall that Greenberg calls the "fast, casual restaurant corridor."
NEWS
By From staff reports | December 2, 2001
In Baltimore County Man uses bomb threat to rob Allfirst bank in Hunt Valley Mall HUNT VALLEY -- A man who claimed to be carrying a bomb robbed an Allfirst Bank at the Hunt Valley Mall of an unknown amount of money yesterday morning. The man entered the bank on Shawan Road about 11:30 a.m. and told a teller that he had a bomb in his shopping bag and would set off unless the teller gave him cash, said Baltimore County Police Officer Norris McKee. Once the man was given money, he left on foot, leaving the bag at the bank, McKee said.
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | January 24, 1991
BEL AIR -- What discounts can't do to boost sales in this recessionary economy, perhaps Elvis can.James Newsome Sr., a 25-year-old tree trimmer from Aberdeen, took a day off from work yesterday to catch the opening day of the Elvis Presley Museum on Tour, which is on display through Saturday at Harford Mall.After he finished examining a sampling of authentic Elvis belts, sunglasses and photos, he went into K&K and bought his son James Jr. a toy. Last year, at the first annual Elvis museum display at Harford Mall, Mr. Newsome decided to buy a $35 pair of Reeboks from the Foot Locker there.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
The developers of Hunt Valley Towne Centre said yesterday that they have signed nearly two dozen new tenants and that the first stores and restaurants will begin opening at the end of the month. Greenberg Commercial, which is redeveloping the center from a depressed enclosed mall to an open-air "Main Street" style market, said the new tenants have leased 90,000 square feet and include national chains and well-known local companies. The first stores will open this month in four free-standing buildings near the front of the mall that Greenberg calls the "fast, casual restaurant corridor."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
A Pennsylvania-based commercial developer has become the top landlord of Class A office buildings in Hunt Valley with the purchase of three buildings, including the former offices of PHH Arval's fleet-management business. Liberty Property Trust, based in Malvern, Pa., said yesterday that it bought three buildings just west of Hunt Valley Mall on International Circle for $22.7 million from financial service provider TIAA-CREF, a group of companies that includes Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association.
NEWS
By Anne Lauren Henslee and Anne Lauren Henslee,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 6, 2004
Six years ago, the Avenue at White Marsh introduced consumers to a non-mall retail experience with a 4,000-seat multiplex theater in a one-street village of restaurants and stores. The project has exceeded all projections, bringing in more than 1.5 million customers annually and serving as a focal point for a burgeoning community. Now developers are banking on creating a similar buzz in Hunt Valley. Open-air shopping centers, also referred to as Main Street or lifestyle centers, are giving retail developers and consumers a new option, according to Anita Kramer, director of retail development for the Urban Land Institute in Washington.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 23, 2002
At Hunt Valley Mall yesterday, mothers dressed their toddlers in velvet and bows at Sears Portrait Studio trying to beat the Christmas picture rush. A half-dozen teen-age girls giggled as they tried on the most outrageous spike heels they could find at DSW Shoe Warehouse. And moviegoers flocked to Hoyts Cinema for the latest Harry Potter release. It seemed the most typical of days at a typical American shopping mall - except for one big difference. Most of the stores in the northern Baltimore County mall have simply disappeared.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2002
A Baltimore-based retail developer plans to buy the struggling Hunt Valley Mall, demolish part of it and rebuild it into a shopping and entertainment-oriented destination to rival successful projects such as The Avenue at White Marsh. The Erwin L. Greenberg Commercial Corp. said yesterday that it has agreed to purchase the 21-year-old mall in northern Baltimore County from Connecticut-based owner Starwood Ceruzzi for an undisclosed price. The sale could close within several weeks, after which the developer would begin razing the vacant, two-story enclosed portion of the mall, leaving free-standing anchors, said Erwin L. Greenberg, the company's chairman.
NEWS
By From staff reports | December 2, 2001
In Baltimore County Man uses bomb threat to rob Allfirst bank in Hunt Valley Mall HUNT VALLEY -- A man who claimed to be carrying a bomb robbed an Allfirst Bank at the Hunt Valley Mall of an unknown amount of money yesterday morning. The man entered the bank on Shawan Road about 11:30 a.m. and told a teller that he had a bomb in his shopping bag and would set off unless the teller gave him cash, said Baltimore County Police Officer Norris McKee. Once the man was given money, he left on foot, leaving the bag at the bank, McKee said.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | October 18, 2012
The American shopping experience changed in the second half of the 1900s from one where customers made their way to free-standing stores ranging from ma and pa operations to department stores to one where customers converged on a single destination, that being a mall with an enclosed and largely climate controlled common area surrounded by outlets selling just about anything. Harford Mall was among the early such facilities, given its relatively rural location when it opened 40 years ago in 1972 at the site of what had been a horse racetrack and county fairgrounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | February 18, 1999
Late last year the Federal Hill noodle shop Tenosix (1006 Light St.) closed. It reopened a couple of weeks ago as a fine dining restaurant with the same name but a new owner and chef.Several readers have called raving about the food. Thomas Chungsakoon was executive chef at Suburban Country Club for 10 years, with his wife, Penny, as his sous chef. The pair is now in the tiny kitchen of the newly renovated Tenosix, turning out gourmet meals. Don't be surprised, for instance, to find steak with foie gras on the menu.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2000
LAS VEGAS - Hunt Valley Mall will become Hunt Valley Centre, a hybrid, two-level "power center" with a mix of big box stores, specialty shops and restaurants. Retail developer Starwood Ceruzzi, the struggling mall's new owner, unveiled plans for a $40 million makeover at the International Council of Shopping Centers convention here, giving potential tenants a first glimpse of the project. The Connecticut-based developer bought the North Baltimore County center about a month ago from Equitable Life Assurance Society.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2000
The Connecticut-based developer buying Hunt Valley Mall has built a reputation recycling obsolete shopping centers in the Northeast. Now Starwood Ceruzzi is moving into the mid-Atlantic and says it sees plenty of potential for its brand of "big box" retailing in Maryland. A year after opening a regional office in Bethesda, the developer has four high-profile Maryland projects in the works. Starwood Ceruzzi expects to close a deal this week to buy Hunt Valley Mall, which has languished half-empty for years.
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