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NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2001
Worlds converged yesterday, as they do every year, at Roedown Farm in southern Anne Arundel County. At least three Rolls-Royces motored over the soggy grass, but so did muscular pickups. Folks in cashmere sipped champagne, while those in jeans hoisted cups of cheap beer. The diverse crowd mingled easily at the Marlborough Hunt Races, a 27-year-old spring tradition where tailgating ranks with the steeplechase competition, in which thoroughbreds leap over fences. "It's an interesting mix of people," said Jeff Smith, as he sat on a blanket with a box of pretzels, a scone's throw from platter after platter of catered delicacies.
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SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | June 27, 2004
The Twin Rivers Sportsman's Club has been around since 1973, hunting the same leased tract in Somerset County for all that time. Members, most of them from the Baltimore area, have done a first-rate job keeping their 900 acres neat and their hunting activities safe. But on Wednesday, Twin Rivers, along with about 40 other clubs with Eastern Shore land leased from the state, will be evicted. To say the majority of the 1,700 hunt club members are upset would be an understatement. "We keep it up. We keep the roads passable.
SPORTS
By JOHN STEWART | July 19, 1992
The Middle Atlantic PGA -- as part of its ongoing effort to promote the game in general, and PGA services in particular -- has scheduled a seminar for representatives of Maryland and Virginia facilities without a PGA professional and course developers.The program, expected to attract about 70 people, will be held Tuesday at Shenandoah Valley Golf Club in Front Royal, Va.Rich Williams, from the national PGA office, will discuss the work of a PGA member and what such a member can do for a club.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | September 14, 1997
FIRST OF ALL, fox hunting is really fox chasing. Rarely is a fox caught and killed in the cross-country pursuit of hounds and horses. The hunters and their pack do not dig out a fox from its den, or "earth" as it is called, once it has found shelter.Robert Taylor has been huntsman (hunt leader) of the Goshen Hounds Hunt Club in Maryland for more than three years. He learned from his father and grandfather, who were skilled huntsmen in his native Ireland, so he knows more than a bit about the subject.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2000
Even though he died nearly a quarter of a century ago, Harvey S. Ladew's 250-acre landmark estate on Jarrettsville Pike near Monkton continues to draw more than 30,000 visitors a year from 40 countries. They come to visit its 22 acres of formal gardens and legendary topiary that the Garden Club of America has designated "the finest topiary garden in America." Known formally as Pleasant Valley Farm and perhaps more commonly as Ladew Gardens, the 15 formal gardens and restored 18th-century manor house are the lasting vision and handiwork of Harvey S. Ladew, the wealthy raconteur, horseman, writer, collector, artist, gourmet, world traveler and horticulturist, who died at 89 in 1976.
FEATURES
June 4, 1994
Thanks for the memories, Sun readers. We received almost 50 responses on the Sundial telephone information service when we asked for anecdotes from those who lived during World War II and found bright spots of humor that helped pull them through the bad times.Even taking into account that the fish grows larger each time the story is told, this selection of remembrances represents the tales we heard from men who fought and women who tended the home front.One shoe waylaid amid hugs and kissesI was working for the war department in downtown San Francisco on VJ-Day.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1996
In medieval Europe, St. Hubert of Liege was hunting one day when he came upon a stag with a crucifix between its antlers. Then he heard a voice warning him to turn to Christ. And then he began blessing hounds before a hunt.No deer were to be seen in Glyndon yesterday, but plenty of Jack Russell terriers, Labradors, and bassets were gathered.Dozens of people braved the cold yesterday to participate in the pious practice of blessing the hunt at St. John's in the Valley Episcopal Church.Founded by St. Hubert -- the patron saint of hunters -- during Good Friday hunts, the ceremony has become a 104-year Thanksgiving tradition in the area.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
Alerted by a phone call one recent Sunday, Stephen Pieper drove his black pickup the few miles from his farm in White Hall to Monkton, where he arrived too late to stop a man from plowing under the corn on 95 acres of land he'd leased for decades. Pieper, who leases more than 1,000 acres in Baltimore and Harford counties, said $100,000 worth of corn was destroyed by the farm's new owner — the CEO of Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group. David Smith, who heads the nation's largest independent TV broadcast company, had no choice, his attorney said.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Western Maryland Bureau of The Sun | November 13, 1994
EXLINE -- Babe Ruth came to these parts to hunt wild turkeys. So did radio's Amos and Andy. Boxer Gene Tunney came, too, and bagged a pheasant or two. And President Franklin D. Roosevelt -- not to mention five other presidents -- spent a lazy afternoon here fishing.They are among the many statesmen, athletes and entertainers, not to mention executives and others, who have hunted or fished among the wooded ridges and ravines of the 3,240-acre Woodmont Rod and Gun Club, a outdoorsman's paradise near Sideling Hill in mountainous western Washington County.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 12, 2013
The second in the Historical Society of Harford County's tours of historically significant or interesting buildings and homes in Harford County will take place this Sunday, March 17, at the Elkridge-Harford Hunt Club in Monkton. The clubhouse will be the focus of the day's tour, according to the society. Designed by prominent New York Architect James O'Connor, the clubhouse was built on the foundation of an older structure destroyed by fire. The public is welcome to stop in and see the home of the second oldest recognized foxhunting club in the United States.
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