Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHunt Club
IN THE NEWS

Hunt Club

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Staff writer | October 27, 1991
A group of fox hunters is trying to block the sale of the 77-acre farm that has been home to the Howard County Ironbridge Hunt Club and its hounds for 60 years.Howard Hunt Properties Inc. plans to sell the land for $1.6 million to Triangle Howard Corp. But seven Howard Hunt shareholders -- including wealthy businessman and former Ambassador Kingdon Gould Jr. -- claim that the board is not authorized to sell the property and that a majority of shareholders has not approved thesale.The group is seeking an injunction from Howard County Circuit Court to prevent the sale.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
Peter Young Martin, a former golf professional and Green Spring Valley Hunt Club champion, died of a respiratory illness March 31 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Owings Mills resident was 64. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of John William Young Martin and Nancy Byers Martin. He was raised at the family home, Snow Hill Farm, site of the Maryland Hunt Cup point-to-point race in the Worthington Valley in Baltimore County. Mr. Martin attended the Gilman Lower School and was a 1966 graduate of Avon Old Farms School in Avon, Conn.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Kathy Bergren Smith and Kathy Bergren Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 25, 2002
THE CALL to the hunt is sounded on a crisp fall morning, and the hounds and riders of the Marlborough Hunt Club are off. For the next several hours, a group of formally attired riders will jump fences, cross streams and circle fields, chasing the hounds that chase the fox. Although their black coats and shining boots may appear fancy, the riders must be nimble enough to keep up with one of the three groups. This is not a sport for the faint-hearted. "It is all a game. Here in America, we do not kill the fox, we are technically `fox chasing,'" says Katherine Cawood of West River, one of three hunt masters for the 125-member club.
EXPLORE
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 12, 2013
The second in the Historical Society of Harford County's tours of historically significant or interesting buildings and homes in Harford County will take place this Sunday, March 17, at the Elkridge-Harford Hunt Club in Monkton. The clubhouse will be the focus of the day's tour, according to the society. Designed by prominent New York Architect James O'Connor, the clubhouse was built on the foundation of an older structure destroyed by fire. The public is welcome to stop in and see the home of the second oldest recognized foxhunting club in the United States.
NEWS
November 28, 2000
James Clark, Jr., former president of the Maryland Senate, was born in Howard County in 1918 and still lives here. This is an excerpt from his memoir, "Jim Clark Soldier, Farmer, Legislator." My mother, Alda Tyson Hopkins, was born on 13 March 1891 at White Hall at Highland, Maryland. White Hall in Highland was the farm of Samuel Hopkins and his wife, Martha Smith Hopkins. They named it after the original White Hall in Anne Arundel County, which was the birthplace of Johns Hopkins and my mother's grandfather, Joseph Janney Hopkins.
NEWS
June 20, 2004
Developers planning subdivisions in eastern Howard County or projects that require conditional-use permission must meet with neighbors before submitting plans to the county. The next meetings are: Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. at the Elkridge library, 6540 Washington Blvd., Elkridge, for a proposal to build three homes on 1.21 acres of parcel 53 of Hunt Club Road, 6018 Hunt Club Road. Thursday at 6 p.m. at 4835 Wharff Lane, Ellicott City, for a proposal to build 15 homes on 5 acres there.
NEWS
January 29, 2000
A water main break on Montgomery Road in Elkridge left more than 50 Howard County customers without water last night. The break occurred between Hunt Club and Old Landing roads about 6: 45 p.m., officials said. County Bureau of Utilities crews planned to complete their repairs by this morning.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | March 9, 1999
State and federal authorities completed a four-year undercover investigation of a Dorchester County hunt club over the weekend, arresting or issuing citations to almost two dozen guides, fishermen and hunters charged with about 400 violations of game and fishing laws.Maryland Natural Resources Police say they began documenting illegal hunting and fishing at the 2,000-acre Golden Hills Farm in February 1995, booking hunting trips through the farm's guide service. They continued their investigation when the farm became a shooting club and began charging members annual dues in 1996.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 20, 2008
Sarah W. "Sally" Sullivan, a homemaker and accomplished horsewoman, died Monday from complications of dementia at Roland Park Place. She was 90. Sarah Whitall was born in Boston and spent almost two years on Nantucket before moving to San Rocco, her mother's family farm in Crownsville. She was a 1935 graduate of Garrison Forest School and studied animal husbandry at the University of Maryland, and the Women's College of Geneva, Switzerland. Mrs. Sullivan met her future husband, E. Murray Sullivan, while racing at the Gibson Island Yacht Club.
NEWS
August 11, 2002
James P. Vonderhorst, founder and president of EPI, manufacturers of labeling equipment, was killed Wednesday in a motorcycle accident in York, Pa. The Parkton resident was 57. Born in Denver and raised in Long Island, where he graduated from high school, Mr. Vonderhorst earned his bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Maryland in 1968. He began his career working with Allis-Chalmers' turbine engineering division and later with Becton-Dickinson and Co. He had been eastern sales manager for AccraPly Labeling Equipment Co., when he started his company, EPI, in the basement of his Parkton farmhouse in 1980.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | December 6, 2008
Marie du P. Scarlett, a homemaker and ranch manager, died in her sleep Nov. 28 at her Annapolis home. She was 92. Marie du Pont was born and raised in Wilmington, Del., and graduated in 1934 from Miss Hall's School in Pittsfield, Mass. She was married the next year to J.P. Wade Levering, a Baltimore businessman, and the couple settled at Edgemont Farm in Dulaney Valley. They later divorced. During World War II, she volunteered at Union Memorial Hospital and managed Edgemont Farm. After the war, she was a longtime volunteer with the Children's Aid Society.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 20, 2008
Sarah W. "Sally" Sullivan, a homemaker and accomplished horsewoman, died Monday from complications of dementia at Roland Park Place. She was 90. Sarah Whitall was born in Boston and spent almost two years on Nantucket before moving to San Rocco, her mother's family farm in Crownsville. She was a 1935 graduate of Garrison Forest School and studied animal husbandry at the University of Maryland, and the Women's College of Geneva, Switzerland. Mrs. Sullivan met her future husband, E. Murray Sullivan, while racing at the Gibson Island Yacht Club.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | February 19, 2007
The dogs of the Green Spring Valley Hounds hunt club are trained to chase a fox for 10 miles or more, pursued by a pack of galloping, hurdling horses over endless Baltimore County farmland. But even after a winter storm has kept them cooped up for a week in the height of fox-hunting season, the hounds still won't so much as step in front of huntsman John Tabachka without his consent. Proof positive that in a sport that caters to the upper crust of the horsey set, the best-mannered creatures are still the dogs.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | April 5, 2006
At the Marlborough Hunt Races in Davidsonville Sunday afternoon, thoroughbred racehorse riders will carry on a country steeplechase tradition that dates back to Ireland in 1752, when two men decided on a whim that a four-mile race from one village church steeple to another would be good fun. Those two thrill-seekers got something started. More than 100 thoroughbreds and their riders are expected for the 32nd annual races, organizers said, along with about 5,000 spectators enjoying the Anne Arundel County event under spring skies.
NEWS
By RONA MARECH and RONA MARECH,SUN REPORTER | December 4, 2005
Robert M. Six, a lifelong equestrian with a renowned and contagious passion for hunting, horses and hounds, died Tuesday in a Forest Hill nursing home of congestive heart failure. The longtime Fallston resident was 94. Mr. Six worked as a groom, was a devoted fox hunter, participated in and judged hound and horse shows, founded a jousting club, loved to watch horse races, and kept horses and up to 20 hounds at a time on his small farm in Fallston. Long after he was able to fox hunt or attend races -- indeed, until the day he died -- he would ask friends and family detailed questions about recent equestrian events.
NEWS
By DAVID NITKIN and DAVID NITKIN,SUN REPORTER | November 11, 2005
The Elkridge Club, the exclusive golf venue where Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. held a much-criticized fundraiser this year, has admitted an African-American member for the first time in its 127-year history, a club newsletter shows. Developer Theo C. Rodgers and his wife, Blanche, are listed as newly elected members in the September newsletter, a copy of which was provided to The Sun yesterday. But as Rodgers writes a new chapter in Elkridge history, a sister facility - the Green Spring Valley Hunt Club, founded in 1892 for fox hunting - awaits its first African-American member, club members say. One member of the Baltimore County club is Jervis S. Finney, the chief legal counsel and ethical adviser to Ehrlich.
NEWS
March 7, 2005
Mary E. Harper, a homemaker and champion golfer, died of cancer Feb. 28 at her Owings Mills home, where she had lived for more than 50 years. She was 81. Mary Eberstadt was born in Baltimore and raised in Lloyd Neck, N.Y. A 1942 Garrison Forest graduate, she worked as a medical technician at Children's Hospital in Washington and at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York City during the 1940s. In 1947, she married Laurence K. Harper Jr., an investment banker, and the couple settled in Owings Mills.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1994
It might seem like a big leap from tropical plant huckster to professional matchmaker, but for Joe Luery, there are similar considerations to making a go of either business.For one, you have to keep in mind that "people are looking for perfection," he says.And whether it's paying for a fancy ficus tree for an office or a night on the town with Prince Charming, people today are "very cost conscious," he says.Mr. Luery has tried to keep both principals in mind in launching his new venture, a matchmaker service for heterosexual adults named -- no joke -- The Hunt Club.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2005
It all feels familiar. The land and course haven't changed. Granted, there are McMansions now, and a Rolls-Royce might drive by the old course. But the dandelions and weather-bent trees may have been here since the 1920s, when as many as 20,000 people came out to this valley to witness a rather eccentric sporting event. There aren't bookie boards anymore, but the red and white flags are again atop the timber fences on the 4-mile course, still bisected by Tufton Avenue and owned by a man with four initials who is nicknamed, simply, Duck.
NEWS
March 7, 2005
Mary E. Harper, a homemaker and champion golfer, died of cancer Feb. 28 at her Owings Mills home, where she had lived for more than 50 years. She was 81. Mary Eberstadt was born in Baltimore and raised in Lloyd Neck, N.Y. A 1942 Garrison Forest graduate, she worked as a medical technician at Children's Hospital in Washington and at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York City during the 1940s. In 1947, she married Laurence K. Harper Jr., an investment banker, and the couple settled in Owings Mills.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.