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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2001
Mucking about with archeologists plucking artifacts from the Confederate submarine Hunley leaves Mark Ragan as happy as a kid making mud pies. About a year ago, Ragan helped raise the Hunley from harbor waters off Charleston, S.C., where it had lain 136 years after sinking the Union blockade ship Housatonic - the first time in history a submarine had sunk an enemy warship. Now he's helping sort out the stuff that's coming out of the sub. Ragan, who lives in a hillside house overlooking Glebe Creek in Edgewater, wrote the definitive book on the Hunley and he's the Hunley project historian.
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NEWS
December 24, 2009
On December 16, 2009, ANN HUNLEY. Services were held on Tuesday at St. Francis Xavier Church. Contributions are requested to be made to The A. Bernice Suggs Hunley Scholarship Fund at Morgan State University.
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NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 2003
A watch recovered from the wreck of the Confederate submersible H.L. Hunley hints that the submarine's occupants might have died from lack of oxygen rather than drowning, researchers said yesterday. The Hunley was the first submarine to destroy an enemy vessel, sinking the Union ship Housatonic at about 8:45 p.m. on Feb. 17, 1864, before disappearing. The watch, which belonged to Lt. George Dixon, the Hunley captain, was recovered last year and was opened for the first time last week, said senior conservator Paul Mardikian of the Hunley Project.
NEWS
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 18, 2004
CHARLESTON, S.C. - Thousands of men in Confederate gray and Union blue, and women in black hoop skirts and veils, escorted the crew of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley, the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship, to its final resting place yesterday. In what was called the last Confederate funeral, the coffins of the crew members, draped in Confederate flags, were first taken to Charleston's Battery and placed in a semicircle, a wreath set in front of each. Then, a column of the uniformed re-enactors stretching 1 1/2 miles took the crew of the Hunley, which sank outside Charleston Harbor, to their final resting place in Magnolia Cemetery, about five miles north.
NEWS
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 18, 2004
CHARLESTON, S.C. - Thousands of men in Confederate gray and Union blue, and women in black hoop skirts and veils, escorted the crew of the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley, the first sub in history to sink an enemy warship, to its final resting place yesterday. In what was called the last Confederate funeral, the coffins of the crew members, draped in Confederate flags, were first taken to Charleston's Battery and placed in a semicircle, a wreath set in front of each. Then, a column of the uniformed re-enactors stretching 1 1/2 miles took the crew of the Hunley, which sank outside Charleston Harbor, to their final resting place in Magnolia Cemetery, about five miles north.
NEWS
By William Hagman and William Hagman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 2002
CHARLESTON, S.C. - It was just an X-ray on a computer screen, but it told a story. There was a small button, a pocket watch and chain, a folding rule, a pocket knife and a small pair of binoculars. And in the background, the fainter image of a bone. "You can picture Dixon in his waistcoat, with his watch and chain," Warren Lasch says. "He's got his binoculars, his rule, his pocket watch. He's at his battle station." Dixon was Lt. George E. Dixon, commander of the CSS Hunley, a 40-foot submarine that was the South's most secret weapon during the Civil War. And the X-ray is of a block of sediment removed from inside the sub, which vanished mysteriously in 1864 and was raised in August 2000 after it was located in 28 feet of water seven years ago. The sub is now being studied and conserved at a remarkable state-of-the-art facility in Charleston.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2000
The submarine went down with all hands lost, and now Mark K. Ragan is in a wet suit and diver's helmet working through the muck and trying to raise the sunken vessel. No, this isn't one more account of the death of the Russian nuclear submarine Kursk and its crew. Ragan's dive took him into the dark waters of the Atlantic Ocean off Charleston, S.C., to help bring up the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley - the first attack submarine to sink a ship in all the history of naval warfare. On a moonlit night in February 1864, C.S.S.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 11, 2000
CHARLESTON, S.C. -- Submerged in the muck off Charleston Harbor is a Civil War relic that rivals Jules Verne's Nautilus for its ingenuity and prowess. Verne's creation was mistaken for a monster from the deep, a mysterious creature whose armor-like hide repelled the sharpest harpoons. Horace Lawson Hunley's creation for the Confederate Navy was dubbed, among other things, "the murdering machine." A secret hand-cranked submarine, the cast-iron vessel sank a Union sloop, the USS Housatonic, on Feb. 17, 1864, and made naval history.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | August 8, 2000
SULLIVANS ISLAND, S.C. - This morning, as the barge carrying the Confederate submarine H. L. Hunley nears Charleston Harbor, the bells of Stella Marris Catholic Church will ring first. Other churches will join in during the historic sub's 13-mile journey from the ocean floor, where it sank 136 years ago, to its North Charleston conservation laboratory. As much as scientists, history buffs and tens of thousands of others eagerly await a glimpse of the historic Confederate relic, the sub's journey is also a ftineral procession.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | September 21, 1993
Alice Hunley may run a day care center for teen-age mothers at Meade High School in Fort Meade, but she makes it profoundly clear that the girls can't just drop off their children and leave them for the day.Real life is not like that, the program's new director says, and she is not a baby sitter."
NEWS
December 21, 2003
On December 16, 2003, MILBREY "Millie" THOMPSON (nee Hunley) loving wife of the late Bernard "Bernie" Thompson, devoted mother of Billy B., Richard L., and the late James and Nancy Thompson, dear mother-in-law of Doris and Jean Thompson, dear grandmother of Cheryl and her husband Jeff, Melanie, Billy B. Jr. and John Ted Thompson Sr., and his wife Jeanette, great-grandmother of Brittney, Aaron, Jacklyn and John Thompson Jr., dear step great-grandmother of...
NEWS
By Thomas H. Maugh II and Thomas H. Maugh II,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 8, 2003
A watch recovered from the wreck of the Confederate submersible H.L. Hunley hints that the submarine's occupants might have died from lack of oxygen rather than drowning, researchers said yesterday. The Hunley was the first submarine to destroy an enemy vessel, sinking the Union ship Housatonic at about 8:45 p.m. on Feb. 17, 1864, before disappearing. The watch, which belonged to Lt. George Dixon, the Hunley captain, was recovered last year and was opened for the first time last week, said senior conservator Paul Mardikian of the Hunley Project.
NEWS
By William Hagman and William Hagman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 2002
CHARLESTON, S.C. - It was just an X-ray on a computer screen, but it told a story. There was a small button, a pocket watch and chain, a folding rule, a pocket knife and a small pair of binoculars. And in the background, the fainter image of a bone. "You can picture Dixon in his waistcoat, with his watch and chain," Warren Lasch says. "He's got his binoculars, his rule, his pocket watch. He's at his battle station." Dixon was Lt. George E. Dixon, commander of the CSS Hunley, a 40-foot submarine that was the South's most secret weapon during the Civil War. And the X-ray is of a block of sediment removed from inside the sub, which vanished mysteriously in 1864 and was raised in August 2000 after it was located in 28 feet of water seven years ago. The sub is now being studied and conserved at a remarkable state-of-the-art facility in Charleston.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2001
Mucking about with archeologists plucking artifacts from the Confederate submarine Hunley leaves Mark Ragan as happy as a kid making mud pies. About a year ago, Ragan helped raise the Hunley from harbor waters off Charleston, S.C., where it had lain 136 years after sinking the Union blockade ship Housatonic - the first time in history a submarine had sunk an enemy warship. Now he's helping sort out the stuff that's coming out of the sub. Ragan, who lives in a hillside house overlooking Glebe Creek in Edgewater, wrote the definitive book on the Hunley and he's the Hunley project historian.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2000
The submarine went down with all hands lost, and now Mark K. Ragan is in a wet suit and diver's helmet working through the muck and trying to raise the sunken vessel. No, this isn't one more account of the death of the Russian nuclear submarine Kursk and its crew. Ragan's dive took him into the dark waters of the Atlantic Ocean off Charleston, S.C., to help bring up the Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley - the first attack submarine to sink a ship in all the history of naval warfare. On a moonlit night in February 1864, C.S.S.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | August 8, 2000
SULLIVANS ISLAND, S.C. - This morning, as the barge carrying the Confederate submarine H. L. Hunley nears Charleston Harbor, the bells of Stella Marris Catholic Church will ring first. Other churches will join in during the historic sub's 13-mile journey from the ocean floor, where it sank 136 years ago, to its North Charleston conservation laboratory. As much as scientists, history buffs and tens of thousands of others eagerly await a glimpse of the historic Confederate relic, the sub's journey is also a ftineral procession.
NEWS
December 21, 2003
On December 16, 2003, MILBREY "Millie" THOMPSON (nee Hunley) loving wife of the late Bernard "Bernie" Thompson, devoted mother of Billy B., Richard L., and the late James and Nancy Thompson, dear mother-in-law of Doris and Jean Thompson, dear grandmother of Cheryl and her husband Jeff, Melanie, Billy B. Jr. and John Ted Thompson Sr., and his wife Jeanette, great-grandmother of Brittney, Aaron, Jacklyn and John Thompson Jr., dear step great-grandmother of...
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2000
For Jason Hunley, it seemed like the chance of a lifetime. His wife, Joy, had been a child actor years ago, and even though she had long since taken up work in the insurance business, she'd never abandoned hopes of a return to Hollywood glamour. He just never realized that making that dream come true might be as easy as logging onto a Web site. Hunley, a Wells Fargo Bank executive from Richmond, Calif., was surfing the Internet one night when the tag line caught his eye: "Who Wants to Be A Movie Star?"
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2000
For Jason Hunley, it seemed like the chance of a lifetime. His wife, Joy, had been a child actor years ago, and even though she had long since taken up work in the insurance business, she'd never abandoned hopes of a return to Hollywood glamour. He just never realized that making that dream come true might be as easy as logging onto a Web site. Hunley, a Wells Fargo Bank executive from Richmond, Calif., was surfing the Internet one night when the tag line caught his eye: "Who Wants to Be A Movie Star?"
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 11, 2000
CHARLESTON, S.C. -- Submerged in the muck off Charleston Harbor is a Civil War relic that rivals Jules Verne's Nautilus for its ingenuity and prowess. Verne's creation was mistaken for a monster from the deep, a mysterious creature whose armor-like hide repelled the sharpest harpoons. Horace Lawson Hunley's creation for the Confederate Navy was dubbed, among other things, "the murdering machine." A secret hand-cranked submarine, the cast-iron vessel sank a Union sloop, the USS Housatonic, on Feb. 17, 1864, and made naval history.
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