Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHunger
IN THE NEWS

Hunger

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Marge Lee | July 17, 1995
I sat at my desk this morningand all I could think about was foodI don't know why I always do that.It occurred to me that hunger is a big part of my life.And I hunger for different things.Food is the most important one.I thought about how I was driven by my hungersand how poignant it might be to controlrather than be controlledI saw a brief moment of noveltyin letting myself stay hungryjust for a little while.To let the hunger buildand grow and press in on you so hardthat you can't resist satisfying your hungerThe hunger, which may or may not be a necessity,becomes an obsessiona driving force working inside of youthat you control.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
The Maryland Food Bank will be joined over the next month by the State Police and the Baltimore Ravens for a communitywide drive to collect food and raise awareness for local families that risk going hungry. The food bank reports that nearly 780,000 Marylanders experience so-called "food insecurity," meaning they don't know if they'll be able to access food for nutritious diet. Other partners joining in the effort - which includes food banks across the country for Hunger Action Month - are the state Department of Transportation, Charm City Run and Giant Food.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 13, 2013
A recent letter to the editor should force every reader to face the ugly truth that there just is apparently not enough money in our federal budget to ensure that all of our people eat well ( "Food stamps are not enough," Nov 7). Does anyone doubt that if the president or Congress selected any man, woman or child at random off the street and empowered them to trim foreign aid we could easily pick up all money we need to feed our people well in a single afternoon? Let's take care of our own first.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | July 13, 2014
Just two pages into the book "Unbroken," its protagonist is in the water, hiding beneath the deteriorating life raft in which he has been drifting across the Pacific Ocean for almost a month. Overhead, Japanese bombers are circling back to strafe him a second time. And sharks are approaching from below. Death is coming for him from two directions, and your impulse is to verify that this is not a novel, not some outlandish fiction from the Indiana Jones School of Narrow Escapes.
NEWS
August 26, 2011
I am glad for the work of Danielle Nierenberg and Amanda Strickler and their Nourishing the Planet project ("Shortening the food chain," Aug. 23). However, there was no mention in their recent opinion piece of the fact that there is already 3,600 calories per person per day available in the U.S., twice what is needed. Good food does not satisfy, although it fills you up. I recommend two cups of water four times a day which amounts to zero calories. Then have one pound of true vegetables such as carrots, cabbage, broccoli, lettuce or celery.
NEWS
November 20, 2012
In the first two weeks after Hurricane Sandy battered the Mid-Atlantic region, leaving millions without power, relief agencies provided an estimated 4.9 million meals to the victims - the equivalent of 150 tractor-trailer loads of food. That was a Herculean task for which those workers should be congratulated, but it was also a drop in the proverbial bucket. Had Sandy never hit the region, there would still be hunger of shocking proportions. In Maryland alone, the latest estimates are that at least 460,000 people are "food insecure," meaning they are not certain to have adequate nutrition on a day-to-day basis.
NEWS
November 23, 2010
The faces look familiar, but the circumstances aren't. Across Maryland, volunteers helping feed the poor report a curious phenomenon: families who once visited as donors of food and money showing up, often sheepishly, as customers. "Many don't know what benefits might be available because they've never had to use them before," says Paula Minsk, chief development officer for the Maryland Food Bank. Throughout Maryland, the economic recession and accompanying unemployment have continued to have a devastating impact on the health and well-being of families.
NEWS
March 29, 2003
On March 27, 2003, JOHN G. HUNGER SR.; beloved husband of Helen M. (nee Cieperisz); devoted father of Maryanna Hunger and John G. Hunger Jr.; dear brother of Jake Hunger, Marie VanDyke and the late Joseph Hunger. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. A Christian Wake Service will be held at the family-owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, Inc., 7922 Wise Avenue, on Sunday at 7 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated in Christ the King Church on Monday at 12 noon. Interment St. Stanislaus Cemetery.
NEWS
March 9, 2008
On March 6, 2008, MATILDA BARBARA (nee Oswinkle); beloved wife of the late Joseph F. Hunger; devoted mother of Joe Hunger and his wife Jackie; and Connie Kane and her husband Jim; loving grandmother of Greg, Jeff and Ken Hunger, Jen, Jimmy and Jessica Kane. Also survived by two sisters, Charlotte and Esther Conway. A Funeral Service will be held at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, Inc., 7922 Wise Avenue, Tuesday, 10 A.M. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery. Friends may call Sunday and Monday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M.
NEWS
March 26, 1991
Throughout the 1980s, stories of hungry children became increasingly common. But these were just stories -- "anecdotal evidence" -- and didn't necessarily prove the existence of a widespread problem. Now, however, the stories can no longer be dismissed as unsupported anecdotes.The release of a new nationwide study of hunger documents in chilling detail the existence of hunger in a land of plenty. Known as the Community Childhood Hunger Identification Project (CCHIP), the study found that nationally, 5.5 million children under 12 -- one in eight -- are hungry, with another six million at risk.
NEWS
By Mike Gesker | July 9, 2014
Sharing the bounty of America's farms is a lifesaving tradition almost as old at the Republic itself. In 1812, President James Madison sent emergency aid to earthquake victims in Venezuela. President Herbert Hoover started a large feeding program in Russia during the 1920s. And after World War II, President Harry Truman launched the Marshall Plan, named for George C. Marshall, which delivered tons of food to the people of Western Europe. In times of emergency, the U.S. government and the American people respond vigorously and generously.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Milton Kent, For The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
The Ravens won't be able to repeat as Super Bowl champions, but that doesn't mean that there won't be a Charm City presence at the big game this weekend. Nancy Longo, chef of Pierpoint, a Fells Point restaurant, will pack her hat, utensils and enough crab meat to feed thousands, to join 31 other chefs from NFL cities in a Super Bowl challenge of sorts put on by the nonprofit Taste of the NFL. Longo and the other cooks will take part in the "Party With A Purpose" on Saturday in Brooklyn.
HEALTH
By Debra Schulze, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
Nutritionists from the University of Maryland Medical System regularly contribute a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. The latest post is from Debra Schulze. Are the stressors of life driving you to overeat? During the holidays, things can get a little stressful, and food is everywhere. Comfort eating can be problematic when it is the primary way you soothe and calm yourself. It can easily sabotage your healthy eating goals and lead to weight gain.
NEWS
November 13, 2013
A recent letter to the editor should force every reader to face the ugly truth that there just is apparently not enough money in our federal budget to ensure that all of our people eat well ( "Food stamps are not enough," Nov 7). Does anyone doubt that if the president or Congress selected any man, woman or child at random off the street and empowered them to trim foreign aid we could easily pick up all money we need to feed our people well in a single afternoon? Let's take care of our own first.
NEWS
October 29, 2013
Grocery prices may be rising - 1.5 to 2.5 percent next year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture - but the ability of poor people to buy them is about to shrink. On Friday, benefits for 47.6 million Americans participating in the Supplement Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), more commonly referred to as food stamps, will be reduced. The size of that reduction is substantial - about $5 billion per year nationwide - and it amounts to about $36 less for a low-income family of four or $11 for an individual.
NEWS
By Deborah Flateman | September 25, 2013
With kids back in school and Labor Day parades and beach parties concluded, it's time to talk about a perennial issue facing our communities: "food insecurity," or more simply put, hunger. With nearly 50 million Americans going without enough food to meet their basic nutritional needs, food insecurity is one of our gravest ills, at the center of dangerous gaps in public safety, public health, education and the economy. In Maryland, the richest state in the nation, 780,000 people don't know where their next meal is coming from, including a quarter of a million children.
NEWS
November 21, 2007
In this season of bounty, there are troubling reminders of hunger in our midst that should not be acceptable. Two reports last week found that the number of hungry Americans, including children, remains about the same, which is way too many people. And things aren't likely to get better as food, energy and housing costs are increasing while salaries remain the same or decline. Reducing hunger requires more aggressive public and private action. The federal Department of Agriculture reported that in 2006, there was a slight increase in "food insecure" households, up from 12.59 million in 2005 to 12.65 million in 2006, or nearly 11 percent of all households.
NEWS
By Olusegun Obasanjo | July 7, 2005
LAGOS, Nigeria - There is a pain in the belly of Africa that just will not go away. It is gnawing at our development goals and undermining our economies. It is blighting the lives of the young and shortening the life span of the old, yet somehow it is getting forgotten. What is this scourge that stalks our continent? A rampant virus with no cure? An insect that pricks our skin and poisons our blood? If it were so dramatic and captivating, it might gather more attention. In fact it is much more prosaic.
NEWS
By Bita Dayhoff | September 12, 2013
September is Hunger Action Month. Together, we can take action to fight hunger in our community, all month long. Hunger Action Month is our opportunity to join a movement that has a real and lasting impact on our effort to feed more Howard Countians than ever before. Whether it's by advocating and raising awareness, making donations, or volunteering, individuals can find the way that's right for them to make a difference during Hunger Action Month. Community Action Council, which manages the Howard County Food Bank, is asking everyone to Speak Out Against Hunger on behalf of the nearly 49 million people in America that struggle with hunger.
NEWS
September 10, 2013
September is Hunger Action Month. Together, we can take action to fight hunger in our community. Since 2008, the number of individuals who visit the Howard County Food Bank has increased from 3,800 to over 22,000. These are your neighbors. About 50 percent of individuals who visit the food bank are senior citizens on fixed incomes. Eighty percent are female and 40 percent earn less than $20,000 per year. Some of the families are receiving SNAP funds, formerly known as food stamps.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.