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NEWS
June 10, 1994
Even when it was a Communist monolith, Hungary brought market economics in by the back door. When communism fell, it was ready to grasp both democracy and capitalism. It is one of the handful of countries (Estonia, Slovenia, the Czech Republic and possibly Poland come to mind) where the transition to capitalism appears successful.And so was a shock that last month the Hungarian people freely booted out the Hungarian Democratic Forum, which had governed in the name of democracy and capitalism since the election of 1990.
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NEWS
April 2, 2014
Regarding James Rosapepe's recent commentary ( "The Romanians were (partly) right ," March 28), I want to add some additional information. For Romania to criticize the Russian seizure of Crimea is like the pot calling the kettle black. Romania had its own expansionistic policy, they just have a convenient amnesia. In 1920, Romania received Transylvania, a part of Hungary for a 1,000 years, in the Treaty of Trianon. Not satisfied, the Romanian Army moved past the demarcation line into the truncated Hungary, trying unsuccessfully to gain further territory.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 15, 1993
BUDAPEST, Hungary -- Kispest, a neighborhood of dirt roads and cottages surrounded by slate-gray apartment buildings, is an incubator of Hungary's young nationalists of the far right.Here, teen-agers are nurtured by mentors three times their age who have taken over the political education of as many young people as they can attract.Istvan Porubszky, the president of the 1956 Anti-Fascist and Anti-Bolshevik Association, presides over Kispest's "skinheads," as the young rightists are called.
NEWS
By David Driver | October 22, 2013
Forget Ted Cruz, Paul Ryan, Hillary Clinton or even Doug Gansler and Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown. An emerging political force in the recent months, including time during the federal shutdown, doesn't represent the Republican or Democratic party - at least officially. Shoving around its public policy agenda is a Seattle native that was born on March 30, 1971: Starbucks. The company has shown recently it is not afraid to tackle social issues on top of serving lattes and pastries. Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz in September announced that guns were not welcome in his stores, though enforcing that edict is another thing.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 7, 1993
BUDAPEST, Hungary -- In partial settlement of its Communist-era trade debt to Hungary, Russia has deeded over 28 state-of-the-art MiG-29 fighter jets -- 26 more than the number of Hungarian pilots who know how to fly them.Even after the Russians train the Hungarians, the planes are unlikely to get much exercise at top speed. Hungary's small territory can be overflown by the supersonic jets in minutes, posing the risk of provocative intrusions into bordering airspace.The acquisition, which has ruffled some neighboring countries, reflects the insecurity felt by Hungarians, who find themselves poorly defended and surrounded by post-Cold War turmoil.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 5, 1991
ESZTERGOM, Hungary -- Hungarians and Roman Catholi pilgrims laid to rest yesterday the remains of Cardinal Jozsef Mindszenty, whose steadfast resistance to fascist and communist tyranny earned him a life of misery in the postwar era.More than 50,000 people attended an open-air funeral Mass on the soggy cathedral lawns overlooking the Danube River to rebury the unflinching fighter for religious freedom, who died in exile in 1975.Born of peasant stock in western Hungary in 1892, Cardinal Mindszenty was first jailed four years after being ordained, during the short-lived Communist revolution of 1919.
NEWS
By Hal Piper | September 23, 1990
Why so many writers and intellectuals at the head of the past year's revolutions in Eastern Europe? Vaclav Havel, a playwright, is the president of Czechoslovakia. Writers and professors play key roles in the transformation of Poland and East Germany. Meanwhile, in the West we have Margaret Thatcher, Helmut Kohl, George Bush. Even their admirers don't call them intellectuals.Arpad Goncz twinkles. Compact, neat, florid, balding, 68 years old with a precise white mustache. He is the president of Hungary, formerly a steel worker, welder, pipefitter, agricultural engineer, lawyer, playwright, translator and political prisoner.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | March 29, 1992
GABCIKOVO, Czechoslovakia -- Like a bad hangover from 40 years of communism, an old exercise in comradely cooperation has become a headache in relations between Czechoslovakia and Hungary.The headache is the Gabcikovo-Nagymaros hydroelectric project on the Danube, and the conflict is simple: The Czechoslovak side wants it, and the Hungarians don't.The problem is that it's already mostly there.For 10 miles, a half-mile wide channel cuts straight through the Danube wetlands and the grain fields of south Slovakia.
NEWS
By Sam Greene | December 13, 1998
BUDAPEST, Hungary - Rabbi Baruch Oberlander arrived in Budapest in the stifling heat of August 1989. For Oberlander, newly ordained, newly wed, loosed from his tight-knit, ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Brooklyn's Crown Heights, it was an uncertain season."
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Jeffrey Fleishman,Los Angeles Times | October 22, 2006
BUDAPEST, Hungary -- The bullet scar on her arm has faded like a distant star, but Maria Sebestyen remembers when tanks clattered through moonlit alleys, the enemy wore a Soviet uniform and for a bloody moment this city held the world's attention. Revolutions get crushed and enemies change. Today, the fervor and romanticism that defined Cold War defiance seem quaint history from a worn book. University students carry iPods instead of Molotov cocktails; the Danube is busy with tourist boats.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
This is a dry white wine made from the same grape that produces the luscious Hungarian dessert wines known as Tokay. It shows the power and complexity of the grape do not depend on its sugar content. It's lush, full-bodied, herbal and a bit exotic - with a distinct touch of pine that I happen to like (maybe not for everyone). At almost four years old it shows no sign of fading. This is an excellent choice when you want the weight of a chardonnay but a different flavor. From: Hungary Price: $12 Serve with: Oyster stew, salmon
NEWS
January 24, 2008
On January 21, 2008, Theophilia E. Mallek Viewing will be held at the Rendon-Bailey Funeral Home, P.A. located at 2818 E. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21224 from 2-5 and 7-9 pm Thursday, January 24, 2008. Services will be at the St. Elizabeth's of Hungary Roman Catholic Church at 2638 E. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD 21224 at 10am on January 25, 2008. Interment will follow at the Holy Rosary Cemetery 7305 German Hill Road, Baltimore, MD 21222. In lieu of flowers contributions can be made to the St. Elizabeth's of Hungary Roman Catholic Church.
NEWS
January 12, 2008
CHARLES TASNADI, 82 News service photographer Charles Tasnadi, who braved minefields and barbed wire to escape communist Hungary and went on to spend three decades as a top Associated Press photographer, died yesterday in Washington after suffering a stroke. Mr. Tasnadi was born Karoly Tasnadi in Ajka, Hungary. During his career, Mr. Tasnadi covered seven presidents, including a return to his native land aboard Air Force One, accompanying President George H.W. Bush. Mr. Bush called him into a forward cabin before landing and told him it was fitting that this was how he should return home for the first time.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Jeffrey Fleishman,Los Angeles Times | October 22, 2006
BUDAPEST, Hungary -- The bullet scar on her arm has faded like a distant star, but Maria Sebestyen remembers when tanks clattered through moonlit alleys, the enemy wore a Soviet uniform and for a bloody moment this city held the world's attention. Revolutions get crushed and enemies change. Today, the fervor and romanticism that defined Cold War defiance seem quaint history from a worn book. University students carry iPods instead of Molotov cocktails; the Danube is busy with tourist boats.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 4, 2004
BERLIN - Hungary announced yesterday that it would withdraw its 300 troops from Iraq by March, becoming the latest country in the 32-member U.S.-led coalition to bow to public pressure and prepare to bring its soldiers home. Speaking at a ceremony marking the end of military conscription, the newly appointed prime minister, Ferenc Gyurcsany, said Hungary was obliged to stay until the Iraq elections, scheduled for January. "To stay longer is an impossibility," he said, adding that the troops would be brought home by early next year.
NEWS
By Tibor Glant | February 11, 2004
DEBRECEN, Hungary - People who risked a lot to regain and secure their political, human and civil rights tend to be more sensitive to possibly losing them again than people who were born with these rights. As of Jan. 5, the United States began fingerprinting, photographing and color-coding people entering the country if they require a visa. I have a beard, I speak English with a funny accent and I need a visa to enter the United States. But I am not and never have been a terrorist. The U.S. government cannot prove my guilt, and I have no chance to prove my innocence.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 2002
BUDAPEST, Hungary - Elementary school teacher Iren Potharn thinks that the old Communist system had some good points and that a Socialist victory in elections today could bring back egalitarian values and give poor people a better deal. But Imre Csonka, the manager of a Mazda dealership, says the beleaguered center-right government of Prime Minister Viktor Orban deserves credit for nurturing the emergence of a middle class. Many of the newly prosperous voters are afraid of losing everything they've gained if the former Communists of the Hungarian Socialist Party come back to power, he said.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 12, 1998
SZEKESFEHERVAR, Hungary -- Here, in what was once the bus-manufacturing capital for the old Communist bloc, lies the answer to why Hungary has thus far been mostly immune to the financial turmoil in Russia.Drive past the pompously ornate Hapsburg facades of the old town, past the peeling paint and grimy smokestacks of the slowly dying Ikarus bus factory, down the highway a few miles through the gently rolling pastures.Suddenly, you're in the presence of some of the best-known names in the global economy.
NEWS
By Kara Eide and Kara Eide,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2003
Three recent graduates of Broadneck High School know all about "oligonucleotides." They have spent long nights learning about these DNA strands, which help health researchers identify mutations. Now the student scientists are gearing up for a fall trip to Budapest, Hungary, to present their newly developed oligonucleotide-coding software at a worldwide science fair. They exhibited their team project at the recent Intel International Science and Engineering Fair in Cleveland. They came home with four awards, among them an invitation to participate in the European Union Contest for Young Scientists.
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