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Hundred Days

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NEWS
April 10, 1995
What was well worth celebrating in Speaker Newt Gingrich's First Hundred Days was the return of leadership, discipline and purpose to the House of Representatives. Like its Senate counterpart, the House had been throttled for years by well-meaning but failed reforms of a generation ago. Its mechanisms for controlling the budget were a bust. Its penchant for creating more and more federal benefits, regulations and mandates reflected the zeal of staff and committee aides imposing their agendas on overwhelmed legislators.
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NEWS
May 1, 2009
One hundred days into his presidency, do you think President Barack Obama is doing a good job? (1,185 votes; results are not scientific) NEXT poll Would you be less likely to buy a car from a company that was in bankruptcy proceedings? Cast your vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
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FEATURES
January 17, 1993
Did your resume get lost in the avalanche of all those others submitted by idealistic baby boomers who want to go to Washington to change the world and drive a BMW?Have you been sitting anxiously by the phone wondering how somebody as brilliant and savvy as you could have been overlooked by a guy from Arkansas?Has your last chance for moving out of your parents' house and getting a real life slipped through your fingers like grits off a razorback?Did you just bend your last saxophone reed?
NEWS
May 25, 2008
CORNELL CAPA, 90 Photographer Cornell Capa, who founded the International Center of Photography in New York after a long and distinguished career as a photojournalist, first on the staff of Life magazine and then as a member of Magnum Photos, died Friday at his home in Manhattan. The subjects of greatest interest to Capa as a photographer were politics and social justice. He covered John F. Kennedy's successful presidential run in 1960, and produced the book Let Us Begin: The First One Hundred Days of the Kennedy Administration.
FEATURES
By Harry Wessel and Harry Wessel,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 1, 1998
"The Hundred Days," by Patrick O'Brian. Norton. 288 pages. $24. Just the arrival of "The Hundred Days," the 19th book in the Aubrey-Maturin series, is unadulterated joy for fans of Patrick O'Brian. It's been nearly two years since O'Brian's last entry, "The Yellow Admiral," and the octagenarian's loyal readers feared the series might be at its end.It's not. In fact, a 20th book is promised for the long-running, high-brow buddy adventure that follows sea captain Jack Aubrey and naval surgeon/spy Stephen Maturin during the Napoleonic Wars of the early 19th century.
NEWS
May 1, 2009
One hundred days into his presidency, do you think President Barack Obama is doing a good job? (1,185 votes; results are not scientific) NEXT poll Would you be less likely to buy a car from a company that was in bankruptcy proceedings? Cast your vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | April 29, 1993
TOMORROW IS the 100th day of the Bill Clinton presidency. But April 30 was not the 100th day of the presidency which made "a hundred days" the yardstick for success.Franklin D. Roosevelt was inaugurated on March 4 (1933), not January 20, which is when Clinton and post-FDR presidents are inaugurated. So FDR's first 100 days in office did not end till June 11.Actually, historians put the end of his "hundred days" at June 16. Congress had adjourned on the 15th, and on the 16th Roosevelt signed into law the last of an impressive number of acts passed by Congress in an unprecedented March, April, May and June.
NEWS
May 25, 2008
CORNELL CAPA, 90 Photographer Cornell Capa, who founded the International Center of Photography in New York after a long and distinguished career as a photojournalist, first on the staff of Life magazine and then as a member of Magnum Photos, died Friday at his home in Manhattan. The subjects of greatest interest to Capa as a photographer were politics and social justice. He covered John F. Kennedy's successful presidential run in 1960, and produced the book Let Us Begin: The First One Hundred Days of the Kennedy Administration.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | April 10, 1995
LAST WEEK the New York Times/CBS News Poll asked: "Are you mostly pleased or disappointed with the things the Republicans have done in the first 100 days of the new Congress?"Forty-seven percent said "disappointed," 39 percent said "pleased." I guess 14 percent said, "You idiot! It's April 4! Congress has only been in session 91 days! How can I answer that? Come back next week!"* * * *Now about this hundred days business. When did it start? Who started it?In this country it is used to refer to the period Congress was in emergency session immediately after the inauguration of Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933.
TOPIC
By Theo Lippman Jr | April 29, 2001
PRESIDENT BUSH has invited all 535 members of Congress to the White House tomorrow for a First Hundred Days luncheon. Paul West, The Sun's Washington bureau chief, noted in a Page One story last Sunday that that the president's advisers "were trying to discourage efforts to put his first 100 days under a microscope." But they've had to yield. Holding the 100-days standard up to a new president's record has become an entrenched ritual for the press, the major parties' leaderships, interest groups, academics and barroom debaters.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2001
If you're looking for opinions, you don't have to go much further than to wherever Rusty Wallace is. The Ford driver is in the thick of the Winston Cup points race, sitting in third place behind leader Dale Jarrett and Jeff Gordon, and now has a platform for his remarks. He isn't wasting it. NASCAR has been trying to give its drivers a little more free time at the races this season, because there are so many more races. It has limited practice on Fridays and limited qualifying to one day. But does Wallace like it?
TOPIC
By Theo Lippman Jr | April 29, 2001
PRESIDENT BUSH has invited all 535 members of Congress to the White House tomorrow for a First Hundred Days luncheon. Paul West, The Sun's Washington bureau chief, noted in a Page One story last Sunday that that the president's advisers "were trying to discourage efforts to put his first 100 days under a microscope." But they've had to yield. Holding the 100-days standard up to a new president's record has become an entrenched ritual for the press, the major parties' leaderships, interest groups, academics and barroom debaters.
FEATURES
By Harry Wessel and Harry Wessel,Knight Ridder/Tribune | November 1, 1998
"The Hundred Days," by Patrick O'Brian. Norton. 288 pages. $24. Just the arrival of "The Hundred Days," the 19th book in the Aubrey-Maturin series, is unadulterated joy for fans of Patrick O'Brian. It's been nearly two years since O'Brian's last entry, "The Yellow Admiral," and the octagenarian's loyal readers feared the series might be at its end.It's not. In fact, a 20th book is promised for the long-running, high-brow buddy adventure that follows sea captain Jack Aubrey and naval surgeon/spy Stephen Maturin during the Napoleonic Wars of the early 19th century.
FEATURES
By Michael Kenney and Michael Kenney,BOSTON GLOBE | August 23, 1998
There's a naval engagement looming this summer, a ship-to-ship duel straight from the days of fighting sail. But it will be fought out in bookstores rather than on the high seas, and the combatants will be flinging sagas at one another rather than cannonballs.Up to windward there's publisher W.W. Norton with author Patrick O'Brian on the quarter-deck, ready for the late-summer publication of "The Hundred Days," the 19th title in his series featuring Capt. Jack Aubrey and seagoing companion Stephen Maturin.
NEWS
By MONA CHAREN | September 13, 1995
Washington. -- The first hundred days of the Republican majority in Congress have almost entered mythology. Looking back, we tend to recall House Republican troops marching in lock step to enact the Contract With America (Senate disappointments would come later).But as ''Inside the Republican Revolution,'' a PBS documentary to air tonight, reminds us, the outcome was not so certain at the time.Producer-director Michael Pack was able to take his cameras pretty much everywhere during those hundred days.
NEWS
May 6, 1995
In retrospect, the most ironic comment in Ronald Reagan's 1981 inaugural address was the following: "You and I, as individuals, can, by borrowing, live beyond our means, but only for a limited time. Why should we think that, collectively, as a nation, we are not bound by the same limitation?"Having delivered this homily, President Reagan proceeded to triple the national debt, from $1 trillion to $3 trillion, during his eight years in office. He did so by massively slashing taxes before making sure the Democratic Congress would reduce government spending commensurately.
NEWS
By MICHAEL NELSON | April 25, 1993
Exactly forty years ago, widespread criticism in the press of Dwight D. Eisenhower's "do-nothing" First Hundred Days surprised the recently inaugurated president. The Constitution gave him four years to make his mark, Mr. Eisenhower complained, so why was he being held up for inspection after little more than three months?The answer, of course, lay in the celebrated "Hundred Days" of Franklin D. Roosevelt's first term. In the period from March 9 to June 16, 1933, Congress passed virtually the entire New Deal program into law, then adjourned.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | April 10, 1995
LAST WEEK the New York Times/CBS News Poll asked: "Are you mostly pleased or disappointed with the things the Republicans have done in the first 100 days of the new Congress?"Forty-seven percent said "disappointed," 39 percent said "pleased." I guess 14 percent said, "You idiot! It's April 4! Congress has only been in session 91 days! How can I answer that? Come back next week!"* * * *Now about this hundred days business. When did it start? Who started it?In this country it is used to refer to the period Congress was in emergency session immediately after the inauguration of Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1933.
NEWS
April 10, 1995
What was well worth celebrating in Speaker Newt Gingrich's First Hundred Days was the return of leadership, discipline and purpose to the House of Representatives. Like its Senate counterpart, the House had been throttled for years by well-meaning but failed reforms of a generation ago. Its mechanisms for controlling the budget were a bust. Its penchant for creating more and more federal benefits, regulations and mandates reflected the zeal of staff and committee aides imposing their agendas on overwhelmed legislators.
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