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By Sonni Efron and Sonni Efron,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 13, 1997
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- If Cambodia is to have a new strongman, Hun Sen has the right resume, according to his friends and enemies.The second prime minister, who controls Phnom Penh after a coup d'etat last weekend, is described as a masterful politician with a record of astutely manipulating Cambodia's vertiginous political scene to his advantage.While Hun Sen's admirers say he has always been careful to operate within the bounds of the law, long before the takeover critics charged that he intimidated opponents and sponsored violence to further his political agenda.
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NEWS
January 25, 2006
At a former military complex outside the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh last week, military authorities handed over a group of new buildings to a United Nations-Cambodian organization. The buildings will serve as a center for investigating and ultimately trying some of the surviving former leaders of the genocidal Khmer Rouge - 27 years after that radical Communist party fell from power. This process of justice, which is finally supposed to begin next month and may take three years, has been in the making for a decade, and there is no certainty that it will proceed as planned.
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NEWS
By PETER ENG | September 21, 1997
BANGKOK, Thailand - Two months after a coup by strongman Hun Sen, what had been the most booisterous voices of Cambodia's nascent civil society are now silent. Dozens of journalists who had worked for media that criticized Hun Sen are in hiding or are exiled in Thailand, and they say it is still too dangerous to return home. Most of the remaining media kowtow to Hun Sen, just as they did when his then-Communist Party ruled Cambodia in the 1980s.The world must keep this in mind when gauging the state of democracy in Cambodia.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 28, 1999
SIEM REAP, Cambodia -- In a country where mismanagement and graft are common, the Cambodian Mine Action Center long stood as a notable exception, its reputation unsullied, its effectiveness unquestioned.CMAC, as it is called, is entrusted with one of the most crucial jobs in Cambodia: clearing mines and unexploded ordnance from a country racked by three decades of warfare involving the United States, Vietnam and Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge army.Together with other agencies, CMAC has made great progress.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 26, 1998
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- Just three weeks ago, opposition leaders were on the verge of boycotting the general election set for today, claiming that a campaign of manipulation and violence by Cambodia's leader, Hun Sen, had made a free vote impossible.But a boisterous, monthlong campaign has turned the situation here upside down. Enthusiastic rallies and internal party polls suggest that two major opposition parties enjoy considerable support among the country's 5.4 million voters.Diplomats say that if Hun Sen does not win the election, he might turn the tables on his critics and be the one to claim that the vote had not been free and fair.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 14, 1997
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- Trying to quell international criticism and domestic panic, Cambodia's de facto leader, Second Prime Minister Hun Sen, yesterday promised free and fair elections and urged human rights organizations and the media to continue their work.Meanwhile, King Norodom Sihanouk, in an extraordinary statement from Beijing, where he is living, said he would not oppose a move to replace his son, ousted First Prime Minister Prince Norodom Ranariddh, with another member of the royalist FUNCINPEC party.
NEWS
September 11, 1993
Prince Norodom Sihanouk was made king of the Cambodia protectorate by the French colonial masters in 1941. After he gave up the throne, converting independent Cambodia to a republic in 1955, he ruled as a prime minister. After he was ousted in 1970 in a coup arranged by ill-informed Americans, Cambodia went to hell and the prince went to Beijing. Now that there has been a remarkable election in May, in which 90 percent of surviving Cambodians voted, he is to be king again. They didn't decide that; he did.The royalist party led by Sihanouk's son, Prince Norodom Ranariddh, came in first in the election.
NEWS
July 10, 1997
PERMANENT WAR has returned to Cambodia with the coup that the Communist strong man, Hun Sen, staged against the royalist, Prince Ranariddh. It came with executions and arrests in Phnom Penh. Warfare returned to the provinces. Sadness and evil revisit the tortured land.This unravels the peace of 1991, which was a triumph of Asian diplomacy brokered under auspices of the United Nations. That peace got the United States off the hook of responsibility for having destabilized Cambodia in the 1970s.
NEWS
June 6, 1993
The Cambodian election was a victory for the United Nations and the peace accord of 1991, and a triumph of the human spirit. The U.N. supervised the country's administration and elections. This tortured, battered, decimated people turned out despite the threats of the Khmer Rouge in numbers that would put Americans to shame. Nine out of ten eligible Cambodians voted.That was a repudiation of the Khmer Rouge, which fearing loss had not taken part. It was also a defeat for the former Communist and Vietnam-influenced Cambodian People's Party of Prime Minister Hun Sen, which had violently harassed the royalist opposition, which won the most support.
NEWS
April 14, 1991
The administration's suspension of $7 million in aid to non-Communist rebels in Cambodia sends the right message, at least to Congress. The administration is carefully studying whether the U.S.- aided forces cooperated militarily with the Khmer Rouge, which the U.S. is sworn not to help. In fact, they have no military significance except alongside the stronger Khmer Rouge. The administration is slowly discovering what its critics know.Message aside, however, the loss of even this minor aid is harmful to Cambodian people, whose crops and roads and schools have been destroyed by U.S.-aided insurrection and who might have benefited from this aid, small as it is. The U.S. should be helping the people, including those in camps operated by the movements of Prince Sihanouk and Son Sann.
TOPIC
By Peter Maguire | January 31, 1999
THE SITUATION in Cambodia raises a difficult question -- one that the United Nations and the human-rights groups will face with increasing frequency in the 21st century: Will accounting for atrocities require the United Nations to appease and to consort with dictators?On Dec. 29, Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen warmly welcomed Khieu Samphan and Noun Chea, the last surviving leaders of the Khmer Rouge, to Phnom Penh.Over the protests of King Sihanouk, the prime minister said the pair should be welcomed "with bouquets of flowers," not threatened "with prisons and handcuffs."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 26, 1998
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- Just three weeks ago, opposition leaders were on the verge of boycotting the general election set for today, claiming that a campaign of manipulation and violence by Cambodia's leader, Hun Sen, had made a free vote impossible.But a boisterous, monthlong campaign has turned the situation here upside down. Enthusiastic rallies and internal party polls suggest that two major opposition parties enjoy considerable support among the country's 5.4 million voters.Diplomats say that if Hun Sen does not win the election, he might turn the tables on his critics and be the one to claim that the vote had not been free and fair.
NEWS
By PETER ENG | September 21, 1997
BANGKOK, Thailand - Two months after a coup by strongman Hun Sen, what had been the most booisterous voices of Cambodia's nascent civil society are now silent. Dozens of journalists who had worked for media that criticized Hun Sen are in hiding or are exiled in Thailand, and they say it is still too dangerous to return home. Most of the remaining media kowtow to Hun Sen, just as they did when his then-Communist Party ruled Cambodia in the 1980s.The world must keep this in mind when gauging the state of democracy in Cambodia.
NEWS
July 31, 1997
THE SHOW TRIAL of Pol Pot, witnessed by one Western journalist who could identify him, is the first solid evidence that one of the world's most monstrous tyrants has been alive in the 18 years since he was last seen.The tyrant was unknown when he launched a campaign of murder, starvation, torture and intimidation that killed one and perhaps two million of his eight million compatriots in order, he said, to purify them. Four years of hideous misrule ended in 1979 when Communist Vietnam's army overran Communist Cambodia to the relief of its people.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 14, 1997
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- Trying to quell international criticism and domestic panic, Cambodia's de facto leader, Second Prime Minister Hun Sen, yesterday promised free and fair elections and urged human rights organizations and the media to continue their work.Meanwhile, King Norodom Sihanouk, in an extraordinary statement from Beijing, where he is living, said he would not oppose a move to replace his son, ousted First Prime Minister Prince Norodom Ranariddh, with another member of the royalist FUNCINPEC party.
NEWS
By Sonni Efron and Sonni Efron,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 13, 1997
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- If Cambodia is to have a new strongman, Hun Sen has the right resume, according to his friends and enemies.The second prime minister, who controls Phnom Penh after a coup d'etat last weekend, is described as a masterful politician with a record of astutely manipulating Cambodia's vertiginous political scene to his advantage.While Hun Sen's admirers say he has always been careful to operate within the bounds of the law, long before the takeover critics charged that he intimidated opponents and sponsored violence to further his political agenda.
NEWS
January 25, 2006
At a former military complex outside the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh last week, military authorities handed over a group of new buildings to a United Nations-Cambodian organization. The buildings will serve as a center for investigating and ultimately trying some of the surviving former leaders of the genocidal Khmer Rouge - 27 years after that radical Communist party fell from power. This process of justice, which is finally supposed to begin next month and may take three years, has been in the making for a decade, and there is no certainty that it will proceed as planned.
NEWS
June 20, 1997
DURING the four years that the Khmer Rouge ruled Cambodia, 1975 to 1979, at least one million Cambodians -- one of eight -- died of execution, murder, land mines, warfare, starvation or disease. Perhaps two million. More fled, mostly to Thailand and camps of awful squalor.The slaughterer of his own people was a Cambodian peasant who learned his Marxism as a student in Paris and returned to lead the Communist insurgency, adopting the pseudonym Pol Pot. He wound up as Cambodia's dictator, enforcing his own versions of ideological and national purity.
NEWS
July 10, 1997
PERMANENT WAR has returned to Cambodia with the coup that the Communist strong man, Hun Sen, staged against the royalist, Prince Ranariddh. It came with executions and arrests in Phnom Penh. Warfare returned to the provinces. Sadness and evil revisit the tortured land.This unravels the peace of 1991, which was a triumph of Asian diplomacy brokered under auspices of the United Nations. That peace got the United States off the hook of responsibility for having destabilized Cambodia in the 1970s.
NEWS
By John D. Cramer and John D. Cramer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 28, 1997
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- At night, you hear the banging of gongs at the pagodas and see the lights of the Ferris wheels near the river front.During the day, the crumbling streets teem with motorbike taxis, scavenging dogs and crippled beggar children. There are neighborhoods that could be mistaken for villages dropped whole into the metropolis -- pigs and chickens, palm-frond shacks, naked toddlers digging in the dirt, mixed together in streets and alleys of a low, green city.Phnom Penh, the Cambodian capital, is waiting for violence while waiting for peace.
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