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NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 2006
DAYTON, Ohio -- The heavy armor added to military Humvees to protect soldiers from roadside bombs and other incendiary devices has had an unintended consequence: Dozens of soldiers have died in Iraq from rollover accidents, a Dayton Daily News examination found. The armor adds as much 3,000 pounds to the vehicle, which makes it more difficult to control and more likely to roll over, especially when operated in the harsh conditions in Iraq, which include night missions, primitive roads and unforgiving terrain.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | August 31, 2012
Crashes of military vehicles account for nearly one-third of annual soldier fatalities  and are among the top five causes of hospitalization, according to new Hopkins research. Researchers with the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy examined the risk factors for injuries to U.S. soldiers  from crashes of Humvees and founded the greatest risk of danger came to the driver or gunner of the vehicle. The study, published in the August issue of the journal Military Medicine, was the the first published analysis of the risk deployed soldiers face in Humvees.
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NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER AND JAMIE STIEHM and NICOLE FULLER AND JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTERS | October 17, 2005
Three Maryland Army National Guardsmen were killed in Iraq when their Humvee was hit accidentally by a tractor-trailer in a convoy last week - the first state Guardsmen killed in the line of duty overseas since World War II, state military officials said yesterday. The soldiers, of the 243rd Engineer Company based at the Melvin H. Cade Armory in West Baltimore, were identified as Spc. Samuel M. Boswell, 20, of Elkridge; Spc. Bernard L. Ceo, 22, of Baltimore; and Sgt. Brian R. Conner, 36, of Gwynn Oak. Their convoy was passing through the Al Taji area, northwest of Baghdad, on Friday when a tractor-trailer struck the rear of their Humvee, said Maj. Gen. Bruce F. Tuxill, adjutant general for the Maryland National Guard.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | February 11, 2010
The bright-red 2010 Rosenbauer Pumper was so new that it didn't even have fire hoses attached. Delivered just last week, the $600,000 fire engine sat in a bay at Station 6 in Dundalk, waiting to be accessorized. It never got a chance to respond to a fire. Instead, the Rosenbauer and other vehicles - including a National Guard Humvee and two ambulances - were damaged, possibly beyond repair, when the firehouse on Sollers Point Road burned and the roof collapsed early Wednesday.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | January 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The thousands of troops that President Bush is expected to order to Iraq will join the fight largely without the protection of the latest armored vehicles that withstand bomb blasts far better than the Humvees in wide use, military officers said. Vehicles such as the Cougar and the M1117 Armored Security Vehicle have proven ability to save lives, but production started late and relatively small numbers are in use in Iraq, mostly because of money shortages, industry officials said.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2002
YOU SEE THEM popping up on the roads, more and more of the mean-looking behemoths that fill the width of a highway lane with a "What's-it-to-you?" sort of attitude. These 4-ton machines are called Hummers and word is that General Motors can't make them fast enough. Such popularity, on the eve of another possible war with Iraq, comes with exquisite irony. The Hummer is the civilian version of the Humvee, the big four-wheel-drive military vehicle whose popularity can be dated to the first gulf war of 1991 when it appeared on television carrying victorious American troops over the dunes of Iraq.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 28, 2003
LANDSTUHL, Germany - Under sudden fire from disguised Iraqi soldiers, U.S. Army Sgt. Charles Horgan could only watch as a missile zoomed toward him. "It was just like in the movies," Horgan said. "It was a whizzing noise. I thought, `Oh, my God, I'm gonna die.'" As he tried to warn his crew, the missile slammed into Horgan's Humvee, blasting him onto the top of the vehicle and knocking his commanding officer out the side. For the next 10 minutes, their unit was engulfed in a shootout with enemy troops - a whirl of gunfire, shouts and smoke outside the southern Iraqi city of An Nasiriyah.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | January 22, 1994
Talk about impulse buying: The weather this past week may have had you wishing you could trade in your car for a cross between a jeep and a tank.And if a salesman for AM General Corp. had been chugging up your icy street in a brand new Hummer, there's no doubt about it: You would have been tempted to sign the dotted line on the spot.Hummer is the rugged -- its big knobby tires come up to your waist -- civilian version of the all-terrain Humvee that AM General produces for the military.It's not a thing of beauty.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Lynn Anderson and Tom Pelton and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | February 18, 2003
The Reisterstown Volunteer Fire Department ambulance was stuck in a 3-foot snowdrift on an entrance ramp to Interstate 795 yesterday, paramedics frantically trying to push it out of its rut as they treated an 87-year-old woman suffering a heart attack. The workers flagged down a Maryland National Guard Humvee - a wide-bodied, camouflage-painted combat vehicle - that happened to rumble past. Sgt. Billie Ray Womble and Spc. Elmer Butts jumped out of the vehicle, hooked a chain around the ambulance's bumper and gunned the Humvee's engine.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1996
First of all, what would possess anyone to leave a heated home to navigate, claw and slosh through the area's frozen all-terrain to the Maryland State Fairgrounds to see this year's international auto show?What would drive anyone to come out in 12-degree temperatures? What could drive anyone here?"IT'S NOT A CAR. IT'S NOT A TRUCK. IT'S NOT ANOTHER 4X4."IT'S A HUMMER!"Quick, get out of the cold. Here in Exhibition Hall 200, follow the mob of men past the sparkling white Cadillac DeVille to the Amazing World of the Hummer.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 10, 2010
Two fire engines, including one just purchased for $600,000, two paramedic units, a brush truck and a U.S. Army Humvee were destroyed in an early morning fire at a Dundalk firehouse, according to a department spokesman. The two-alarm blaze that began shortly after 3 a.m. caused the roof to collapse at the Engine 6 building at Dunman Way and Merritt Boulevard, a block from the Dundalk Middle School. A cause of the fire remains under investigation, said spokesman Kyrle Preis. Officials said firefighters sleeping in the firehouse's living quarters, which is next to the fire engine bay, awoke to the sound of a fire alarm.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,Sun reporter | August 29, 2007
CAMP BUEHRING, Kuwait -- As the Humvee began to flip over, no one was holding Maryland National Guard Army Cpl. Joseph Giles the right way. So the gunner's 5-foot, 5-inch frame, weighed down by a Kevlar helmet and armor-plated vest, began to slip out of the arms of the four other soldiers and inch toward the open hole on the top of the military jeep simulator. Eventually, the crew from the 1st Battalion, 175th Infantry Regiment corrected, but the lesson wasn't lost on the war-bound soldiers.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | March 14, 2007
DELMAR -- A 23-year-old Army infantryman from the Eastern Shore - the father of two young children he last saw at Christmas - was killed Sunday by a roadside bomb that exploded near the Humvee vehicle he was riding in while on patrol with the 10th Mountain Division in Iraq. Family members described Specialist Tommy Lee Latham as an enthusiastic recruit who declared his determination to join the military after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, which deeply affected him and others in his 2002 graduating class at Wicomico High School in nearby Salisbury.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | February 15, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Marines in heavily armored Humvees are being killed by powerful roadside bombs at such a rate that the Marine Corps intends to replace all its Humvees in Iraq with specialized blast-resistant armored vehicles, according to senior Marine officers. The Army will continue to rely primarily on its armored Humvees in Iraq, senior Army officers said yesterday. The decision to scrap the Marines' Humvees in Iraq, after years of trying to protect their crews by adding armor plate, was made by Lt. Gen. James N. Mattis, commander of Marine forces in the Middle East.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,Sun reporter | January 10, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The thousands of troops that President Bush is expected to order to Iraq will join the fight largely without the protection of the latest armored vehicles that withstand bomb blasts far better than the Humvees in wide use, military officers said. Vehicles such as the Cougar and the M1117 Armored Security Vehicle have proven ability to save lives, but production started late and relatively small numbers are in use in Iraq, mostly because of money shortages, industry officials said.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | June 11, 2006
DAYTON, Ohio -- The heavy armor added to military Humvees to protect soldiers from roadside bombs and other incendiary devices has had an unintended consequence: Dozens of soldiers have died in Iraq from rollover accidents, a Dayton Daily News examination found. The armor adds as much 3,000 pounds to the vehicle, which makes it more difficult to control and more likely to roll over, especially when operated in the harsh conditions in Iraq, which include night missions, primitive roads and unforgiving terrain.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN COLUMNIST | January 15, 2003
"Like nothing else." - Hummer slogan LeBron James' celebrated schoolboy basketball career may go down the tubes. But, man, he sure has nice wheels. Maybe you heard that Ohio high school officials are investigating whether James, an 18-year-old who could be the No. 1 pick in the NBA draft this year, broke any eligibility rules by tooling around in his new Hummer H2. James reportedly got the H2 as a birthday gift from his mother. But the Hummer has a base price of $49,190. And when a high school player rides around in something that goes for that number of Benjamins, it's not just eyebrows that get raised, it's entire facial and skeletal structures.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | August 31, 2012
Crashes of military vehicles account for nearly one-third of annual soldier fatalities  and are among the top five causes of hospitalization, according to new Hopkins research. Researchers with the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy examined the risk factors for injuries to U.S. soldiers  from crashes of Humvees and founded the greatest risk of danger came to the driver or gunner of the vehicle. The study, published in the August issue of the journal Military Medicine, was the the first published analysis of the risk deployed soldiers face in Humvees.
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER AND JAMIE STIEHM and NICOLE FULLER AND JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTERS | October 17, 2005
Three Maryland Army National Guardsmen were killed in Iraq when their Humvee was hit accidentally by a tractor-trailer in a convoy last week - the first state Guardsmen killed in the line of duty overseas since World War II, state military officials said yesterday. The soldiers, of the 243rd Engineer Company based at the Melvin H. Cade Armory in West Baltimore, were identified as Spc. Samuel M. Boswell, 20, of Elkridge; Spc. Bernard L. Ceo, 22, of Baltimore; and Sgt. Brian R. Conner, 36, of Gwynn Oak. Their convoy was passing through the Al Taji area, northwest of Baghdad, on Friday when a tractor-trailer struck the rear of their Humvee, said Maj. Gen. Bruce F. Tuxill, adjutant general for the Maryland National Guard.
NEWS
By NICOLE FULLER AND ANNIE LINSKEY and NICOLE FULLER AND ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTERS | October 4, 2005
An Anne Arundel County high school sports star and father of three is the latest Maryland soldier to die in Afghanistan, the Defense Department announced yesterday. Sgt. 1st Class James J. Stoddard Jr., 29, of Crofton was killed when the Humvee he was riding in rolled into a ditch in Kandahar, according to the Pentagon and his wife, Amy Stoddard, who said she was told that six others in the vehicle survived the accident. While at Arundel High School, Sergeant Stoddard was known for his curve balls on the pitching mound in baseball and for his play as a wide receiver on the school's football team.
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