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NEWS
September 26, 2012
Susan Reimer 's attempt at humor in her commentary on evidence that Jesus had a wife was at best pathetic and at worst blasphemous ("At Home with the Jesuses?" Sept. 24). No wonder we live in a world where Christian values have been reduced to mere punch-lines. In her failed bid at jocularity, Ms. Reimer reinforces the secular-progressive mind set that the mere mention of God is somehow an affront to every "scholarly" liberal. Remember, these are the same people who insist that long-held Christian doctrines be abandoned in favor of wholesale slaughter of the unborn and same-sex unions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Lori Sears and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
The true mettle and value of a musician is how naturally he can perform live. And on stage, Billy Joel is one of pop music's best, a seasoned veteran who's genuine, at ease and funny. There are no elaborate dance numbers, no over-the-top sets, no trickery, explosions or guitar-smashings. It's just Billy and his top-notch, eight-member band on a simple but classy set -- with large video screens and color lighting ... and 20-plus classic rock/pop songs that have made up the soundtrack of many lives.
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NEWS
January 23, 2013
Cartoonist Garry Trudeau's latest attempt at humor was the most despicable, vile and disingenuous display of untruth ever published in The Sun ("Doonesbury," Jan. 17). I guess Mr. Trudeau conveniently forgot how the Democrats here in Maryland pulled off the most outrageous gerrymandering act ever. And to intimate that the only way Republicans can win in the future is by suppressing votes goes way beyond the pale. Shame on The Sun and shame on Mr. Trudeau for his disgusting, unfunny cartoon.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
The Rev. Father Joseph Valentine Messer, a Roman Catholic priest who served in Glen Burnie and Severna Park, died of dementia complications Wednesday at Stella Maris Hospice. The Timonium resident was 90. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., he was the son of Henry Philip Messer, who managed the old John Murphy church goods firm, and the former Mary Magdalen Goeckler, a homemaker. After his family moved to Halethorpe when he was a boy, he attended Ascension School and was a Catonsville High School graduate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
Aimee Mann's best-known songs — "Wise Up," the Academy Award-nominated "One" — have given her a reputation as a lyricist of bleak and tragic ballads. But Mann has always displayed a streak of black humor. One doesn't need to go much further than her Twitter account for fresh evidence of this. "Am I really going to read this giant autobiography of Slash?" she tweeted recently. "Signs point to 'unlikely.'" On Oscar night, the missives were just as acid. "We here in my living room are finding these Adrien Brody commercials inexplicable," she wrote.
NEWS
By Matthew McNabney | November 26, 2012
I turned 50 last month. As expected, I received many of the handshakes, high-fives, and other celebratory gestures befitting such a milestone. I also received a few of those special birthday cards. You know — those "humorous" cards that poke fun at presumed maladies that come with aging and which tend to focus on difficulties in the sexual and cognitive realms. These types of cards are plentiful at local card shops and drug stores, even my own hospital's gift shop. A presumed decline in one's physical and mental capabilities is built into these funny messages, which are designed to make us laugh at our situation.
FEATURES
By Niki Scott and Niki Scott,Universal Press Syndicate | May 10, 1992
A recent column about mean-spirited humor, which began ". . . it wasn't my best moment, but at least I didn't laugh . . .," brought in a surprising amount of mail -- and most of you weren't laughing, either.From Bloomington, Ill., a reader of the Daily Pantagraph wrote: "I want to commend you on your timely column entitled 'Mean-spirited Humor Doesn't Deserve a Laugh.' Having recently experienced such 'humor,' I was elated to see you address this subject."What many people try to pass off as humor is in reality their way of stating what their innermost thoughts are, and since they can't be open and honest with people, they viciously attack by this method.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1995
George Elmer Zepp Jr., retired district operations manager for Good Humor Corp., died Sunday at Franklin Square Hospital from complications of a stroke. He was 72.Mr. Zepp, who retired in 1982, was responsible for managing drivers and their routes. He began his career at the ice cream company, which has its headquarters on Greenspring Drive in Cockeysville, in 1946 as a route vendor.As a Good Humorman, his route was the streets and alleys of Northeast and East Baltimore. Known to his young customers as "Mr. George," he would help them safely cross the street to buy ice cream from the truck.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 4, 1993
Judging from "Catskills on Broadway," the four-member comedy revue now at the Lyric Opera House, it seems safe to say you can take the comic out of the Catskills, but you can't take the Catskills out of the comic.Food is a major activity at the hotels in the Catskills, explains Mal Z. Lawrence, the comic who comes on last and earns some of the biggest laughs. "People eat so much food up there, they have developed a new disease -- Anorexia Ponderosa."Food is an ideal metaphor to describe the appeal of this show, which appears to be something of an acquired taste -- like gefilte fish.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 5, 1995
One reason George Kelly's 1924 comedy, "The Show-Off," isn't produced more often is probably that it's not an easy play to do. Subtitled "A Transcript of Life in Three Acts," the script takes somber twists and turns you wouldn't expect in a standard comedy. At the same time, it doesn't emphasize plot. Instead, the gist of the play -- and much of its humor -- lies in the characters.Thanks to the well-tuned performances under Irene Lewis' direction at Center Stage, that humor bubbles to the surface, bringing with it the realization that in many respects this by-gone era was not so different from our own.The situation is fairly simple.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
Henry F. Cerny, a dentist who had a practice in Westminster for nearly 30 years, died June 28 at the Golden Living Center in Westminster of complications from a fall. He was 94. A native of Baltimore, Dr. Cerny was a 1937 graduate of Kenwood High School and a 1943 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Dentistry. He also spent a year at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy before joining the Army. He served as a captain in the U.S. Public Health Service. While with the service, Dr. Cerny spent time as a dentist at Leavenworth Penitentiary in Kansas.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
William G. "Bill" Evans, an award-winning Baltimore advertising executive who was the creative force behind the enduring "Charm City" advertising campaign of the early 1970s, died June 20 of cancer at the Hospice of Queen Anne's in Centreville. He was 83. "Bill certainly came out of the 'Mad Men' world. He was one of the first new breed of intellectual advertising writers. And he was definitely a character. There is no question about that. He was a very unique guy and writer," recalled ad executive Allan Charles, who began working with Mr. Evans in the early 1970s.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
It's a like a beatbox battle out there on the runways as airlines compete to release the most catchy and viral safety videos. Virgin America is the most recent with its "safety dance" video highlighting YouTube favorite and former American Idol contestant Todrick Hall dancing along with some very attractive and well-coordinated people. Inflatable safety vests have never looked so good. Last week, Delta released its holiday short featuring a variety of Christmas characters as passengers.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2013
Sometimes, Maryland defensive line coach Greg Gattuso will lapse back to when he was a howling bear of a head coach stalking the sidelines as if looking for prey. Gattuso coached Duquesne for 12 seasons, and - while he understands his role is more limited at Maryland - he never relinquished his passion or his penchant for looking at the big picture. It's who he is. "I was very aggressive as a head coach," said Gattuso, 51, a former defensive tackle who played for the late Joe Paterno on Penn State's 1982 national championship team and remained loyal to the coach.
NEWS
June 21, 2013
Leave it to our well-meaning leaders who by education and legislation want to eliminate "bullying," a behavior that has probably existed since the dawn of mankind. It is a survival instinct. Good luck trying to get rid of a survival instinct. I would be devastated if my child harmed himself due to bullying, but whom would I be angry at? The world? From childhood through adulthood we are constantly being confronted by bullies. If you do not discover an intelligent, effective, positive way to deal with them, you are doomed.
NEWS
February 27, 2013
I watched Sunday's Oscars hoping that this year they would be better. I have heard that viewers are decreasing yearly. It is no mystery why. The Oscars are supposed to be the entertainment industry's highest award, yet we are continually exposed to juvenile humor that would be more appropriate in a bar (if that). My prime example is the opening number in which host Seth MacFarlane sang about whose "boobs" have been seen in movies. As the Mr. MacFarlane pointed out, the show was being watched around the world by 1 billion people, and this is the best we can do?
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | November 1, 2009
No winner of the Mark Twain Award has been more in tune with Twain than Bill Cosby. He not only feels an affinity for the giant of American literary comedy. He also knows the underlying principles of Twain's oeuvre. Over the phone two weeks ago, when I ask him what he feels about winning the award, he asks me if I know what Twain said about the difference between American humor and English and French humor. Twain's definition of our native genius for yarn-spinning pinpoints what's distinctive about Cosby's achievement.
NEWS
January 23, 2013
Cartoonist Garry Trudeau's latest attempt at humor was the most despicable, vile and disingenuous display of untruth ever published in The Sun ("Doonesbury," Jan. 17). I guess Mr. Trudeau conveniently forgot how the Democrats here in Maryland pulled off the most outrageous gerrymandering act ever. And to intimate that the only way Republicans can win in the future is by suppressing votes goes way beyond the pale. Shame on The Sun and shame on Mr. Trudeau for his disgusting, unfunny cartoon.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
Bay Theatre Company's production of Norm Foster's "The Foursome" might well be described as a profound comedy. In this season's second show, running through Jan. 13, Bay president Barbara Dwyer Brown promises to deliver "the gift of laughter in an exploration of the wonders of the male psyche on the golf course. " Foster's works are produced more frequently than those of any other playwright in Canadian theater history, with more than 150 productions annually. The author of more than 40 plays, he finds riotous comedy in believable people dealing with life situations.
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