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NEWS
By NEAL R. PEIRCE | July 4, 1994
Charlotte, North Carolina. -- Too many of today's newspapers and broadcasters, says Edward Fouhy of the Pew Center for Civic Journalism, ''exhibit the attention span of a hummingbird.''Neal R. Peirce writes a column on state and urban affairs.
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NEWS
Teddi Glaros Nicolaus | April 29, 2014
Hang the feeder and grab the camera! Throughout May, hummingbirds will be returning en masse to Howard County from their wintering grounds in Central America. The smallest of the world's birds, these tiny flying jewels are now shopping around for summer homes. With a little planning, you can easily sell a few of them on the amenities of your own backyard or garden. Hailed by many cultures as symbols of love, joy, life, luck and beauty, hummingbirds delight and amazeĀ  bird watchers.
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FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS | May 24, 1992
Tropical color is warming northern latitudes. We have the hot summers, now we have the hot styles. The tints and frills of rain forest birds will grace pretty shoulders this season. And the coolest way to capture the sparkle of a summer sundown is in pinks, purples and hummingbird blues. Color is a rich natural resource.
EXPLORE
hippodromehatter@aol.com | September 20, 2012
Mayan legend that explains how these beautiful birds were created from spare parts left over when the other birds were created by the Mayan sun god. The plumage of a ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) shimmered in the early-morning sunlight as it darted back and forth while sipping nectar from the blossoms of a red-flowered rosebush. Plus, it was so preoccupied with feeding, my presence didn't appear to disturb it, even though I was a mere 3 feet away.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 22, 2008
This is the time of year the Ruby-throated Hummingbird returns to South Florida to dine on nectar and small insects and entertain local birdwatchers. The area might be better known for its larger avian species, but this little hummer outshines them all in an area very close to my heart. Just below it, to be exact. The tiny bird will eat as many as 14 meals per hour and can consume up to 15 times its weight over a 12-hour period. Needless to say, I'm very impressed.
NEWS
By BILL DALEY and BILL DALEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 1, 2006
A search for the simplest chicken-soup recipe led me to an old and, unfortunately, long-ignored cookbook on my shelf, Truly Unusual Soups, by Lu Lockwood. That's where I rediscovered this recipe for a chililike soup. Looking down at the splattered page brought me back to when I was 23 and just starting out in newspapers covering the small but tony Connecticut town where Lockwood managed a popular restaurant. Truly Unusual Soups was loaded with quick recipes, of which Hummingbird Bean Soup was the best.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 1998
FRIDAY MORNING, I looked out the window and saw frost on the roof. Wouldn't you know it? A frost comes just after we put in the chrysanthemums.The temperature wasn't cold enough to kill the flowers next to the house, so we can enjoy their rich color a little longer. Later in the day, I was happy to see that another planting of chrysanthemums had survived.At Route 424 and U.S. 50 sits the Doepkens Farm. For the past four years, Bill Doepkens has created a chrysanthemum portrait on the hillside next to his farmhouse.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | February 26, 2006
SPLURGE OF THE WEEK WELCOME TO THE NEIGHBORHOOD Native Americans, to keep valuable seed from blowing away or being eaten by birds, often hid it inside little balls of clay. This same method is offered by Gardener's Supply. Each of three different types of clay balls contains its own seed collection of 20 or more different kinds. Just scatter the seed balls on prepared soil, water well and keep moist. Plant in spring after all danger of frost. Each ball will cover one square foot. Seeds will germinate in 7 to 30 days.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2002
The unlikely friendship began with a red and white quilt, sewn in a diamond and square pattern. Katina Nicoloudakis, 11, was half awake, groggy from an operation to lengthen her leg in May when someone at Sinai Hospital handed her the blanket and she snuggled it close. Back home in Charleston, W.Va., when she examined it, she saw it had been made by Dorothy Purcell of Kingsville and decided to write the woman a thank-you note. Everyone who had come into her room admired it, she wrote, and now she slept with it at night.
NEWS
September 15, 1998
TOWSON -- A county code official yesterday fined Home Depot Inc. and a local demolition contractor $10,800 for destroying three historic buildings in Timonium without a permit. Code Official Stanley J. Schapiro said $7,800 of the fine could be waived if the companies donate an equal amount or more to the county historical society.Preservationists said that while the buildings on the 100 block of Church Lane were of marginal importance, their destruction in July to make room for a Home Depot represented a lack of respect for the county's history.
EXPLORE
November 15, 2011
Editor: Whenever I would see the late, iconic Imogene Johnston, she knew what to expect ... every single time ... you see, many, many years ago when I first met this fine, energetic lady who was a political dynamo, she reminded me of a busy, flying creature of nature ... and thus on our first meeting the name "Dixie Hummingbird" just came out instead of calling her "Miss Johnston" or "Imogene" ... and so it was, over the years, on photographic shoots,...
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 22, 2008
This is the time of year the Ruby-throated Hummingbird returns to South Florida to dine on nectar and small insects and entertain local birdwatchers. The area might be better known for its larger avian species, but this little hummer outshines them all in an area very close to my heart. Just below it, to be exact. The tiny bird will eat as many as 14 meals per hour and can consume up to 15 times its weight over a 12-hour period. Needless to say, I'm very impressed.
NEWS
By BILL DALEY and BILL DALEY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 1, 2006
A search for the simplest chicken-soup recipe led me to an old and, unfortunately, long-ignored cookbook on my shelf, Truly Unusual Soups, by Lu Lockwood. That's where I rediscovered this recipe for a chililike soup. Looking down at the splattered page brought me back to when I was 23 and just starting out in newspapers covering the small but tony Connecticut town where Lockwood managed a popular restaurant. Truly Unusual Soups was loaded with quick recipes, of which Hummingbird Bean Soup was the best.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | February 26, 2006
SPLURGE OF THE WEEK WELCOME TO THE NEIGHBORHOOD Native Americans, to keep valuable seed from blowing away or being eaten by birds, often hid it inside little balls of clay. This same method is offered by Gardener's Supply. Each of three different types of clay balls contains its own seed collection of 20 or more different kinds. Just scatter the seed balls on prepared soil, water well and keep moist. Plant in spring after all danger of frost. Each ball will cover one square foot. Seeds will germinate in 7 to 30 days.
FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2002
The unlikely friendship began with a red and white quilt, sewn in a diamond and square pattern. Katina Nicoloudakis, 11, was half awake, groggy from an operation to lengthen her leg in May when someone at Sinai Hospital handed her the blanket and she snuggled it close. Back home in Charleston, W.Va., when she examined it, she saw it had been made by Dorothy Purcell of Kingsville and decided to write the woman a thank-you note. Everyone who had come into her room admired it, she wrote, and now she slept with it at night.
NEWS
By Barbara Stewart and Barbara Stewart,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 30, 2001
NEW YORK - Two calliope hummingbirds, each one-tenth of an ounce and 2,000 miles off course, are attracting hundreds of people to Fort Tryon Park at the northern tip of Manhattan. The tiny birds are also inspiring debates over the virtues of compassionate interference with nature vs. steely-hearted but scientifically correct Darwinism. The birds ought to be sipping nectar in the Mexican sun by now. Ordinarily, they summer in British Columbia and migrate through the Rockies into Mexico.
EXPLORE
November 15, 2011
Editor: Whenever I would see the late, iconic Imogene Johnston, she knew what to expect ... every single time ... you see, many, many years ago when I first met this fine, energetic lady who was a political dynamo, she reminded me of a busy, flying creature of nature ... and thus on our first meeting the name "Dixie Hummingbird" just came out instead of calling her "Miss Johnston" or "Imogene" ... and so it was, over the years, on photographic shoots,...
NEWS
Teddi Glaros Nicolaus | April 29, 2014
Hang the feeder and grab the camera! Throughout May, hummingbirds will be returning en masse to Howard County from their wintering grounds in Central America. The smallest of the world's birds, these tiny flying jewels are now shopping around for summer homes. With a little planning, you can easily sell a few of them on the amenities of your own backyard or garden. Hailed by many cultures as symbols of love, joy, life, luck and beauty, hummingbirds delight and amazeĀ  bird watchers.
NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 27, 1998
FRIDAY MORNING, I looked out the window and saw frost on the roof. Wouldn't you know it? A frost comes just after we put in the chrysanthemums.The temperature wasn't cold enough to kill the flowers next to the house, so we can enjoy their rich color a little longer. Later in the day, I was happy to see that another planting of chrysanthemums had survived.At Route 424 and U.S. 50 sits the Doepkens Farm. For the past four years, Bill Doepkens has created a chrysanthemum portrait on the hillside next to his farmhouse.
NEWS
September 15, 1998
TOWSON -- A county code official yesterday fined Home Depot Inc. and a local demolition contractor $10,800 for destroying three historic buildings in Timonium without a permit. Code Official Stanley J. Schapiro said $7,800 of the fine could be waived if the companies donate an equal amount or more to the county historical society.Preservationists said that while the buildings on the 100 block of Church Lane were of marginal importance, their destruction in July to make room for a Home Depot represented a lack of respect for the county's history.
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