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Humble Beginnings

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NEWS
By Helen J. Ails | February 1, 1996
Four thousand years ago, legend tells us,Lei-tsu dropped a curious fuzzy objectInto a bowl of hot water.Her eyes must have widenedas the delicate cobwebby tangleLoosened, then released a single, endless filament.The lifeless chamber had given up itsSecret as it relaxed and unwound, revealingVisions of potential. With patience, and delicacy,The lovely web, not spidery wide, butTiny and tight, unwound. Thenwas rewound, metamorphosed.Lei-tsu's strand became stronger than string,Or yarn, or even steel (if thickness be the same)
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SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson | November 20, 2012
Handing out turkeys and pumpkin pies Tuesday night at Booker T. Washington Middle School in Baltimore, Ravens free safety Ed Reed said he never forgets his humble roots growing up in Louisiana. "I'm from neighborhoods like this one in the inner city," Reed said. "I had mentors who helped me to get to where I am today. That speaks volumes for me and my life. We just want to make sure as many families as we can have a great Thanksgiving.  "It's just awesome man. This is what Thanksgiving is about: the people and families that you remember, seeing those smiles knowing that you're helping someone be happy.
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FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2004
Horatio Alger has nothing on these guys. Fleeing post-revolutionary Cuba, Carlos M. Gutierrez began working for Kellogg's by selling cereal off his truck. He is now chief executive of the cereal giant. Abandoned by his mother at age 4, Bernard Kerik took a fat pay cut to be a beat cop in crime-riddled Times Square. He later played a key role in New York City's response to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Living in a two-bedroom house with seven siblings, Alberto Gonzales was raised by loving parents who were migrant workers and who never finished elementary school.
SPORTS
By Jerry Crowe, Tribune Newspapers | February 16, 2011
A Sunday drive in his vintage Ford Galaxie can't help but remind Adrian Smith of the 1966 NBA All-Star Game. Smith, an unlikely star among stars, won the gas-guzzling convertible as the game's most valuable player. Forty-five years later, it's still parked in his garage. "I was going to take it out today," Smith says from his home in Cincinnati, "but we're expecting bad weather. " The former guard, whose All-Star appearance in 1966 was his first and last in 11 pro seasons, still climbs behind the wheel for occasional freeway jaunts, gunning the powerful engine.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | July 22, 2007
Confessions of a former Sex and the City addict: I secretly despised Carrie Bradshaw. Here was the country's most glam television character, a New York City newspaper columnist, parading around in the likes of Prada and Gucci and two holy Christians -- Dior and Louboutin. "A real journalist could never afford those clothes!" I'd scream at the television set. Believe me, I would know. So when I heard that Sarah Jessica Parker -- the actress who played Carrie on HBO's hit show -- was teaming up with discount chain Steve & Barry's to produce a line of low-cost, high-style clothing for women, I felt tremendously validated.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson | November 20, 2012
Handing out turkeys and pumpkin pies Tuesday night at Booker T. Washington Middle School in Baltimore, Ravens free safety Ed Reed said he never forgets his humble roots growing up in Louisiana. "I'm from neighborhoods like this one in the inner city," Reed said. "I had mentors who helped me to get to where I am today. That speaks volumes for me and my life. We just want to make sure as many families as we can have a great Thanksgiving.  "It's just awesome man. This is what Thanksgiving is about: the people and families that you remember, seeing those smiles knowing that you're helping someone be happy.
SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey | September 8, 2004
IN THIS far-flung world of sports journalism, your faithful correspondent has always hunted for tales of humble beginnings and humbled endings. And then there is Deion Sanders. I knew him when ... not that he cares. "Sorry, sis. Nothing personal. I only talk on Thursdays," Sanders said yesterday. Ah, to be Prime Timed not once, but twice, during an otherwise plausibly successful reporting career. Some of us were around 15 years ago when "Prime Time" took his show to The Show. Or, rather, took his show to the prelude to The Show.
NEWS
By Judy Fruchter Minkove | January 8, 2004
SHE WAS A reporter's dream, a guaranteed great story. Her compelling tales about Elvis riveted listeners. But they weren't merely tales. They were powerful anecdotes about a young man's character, and my mother, Jeannette Fruchter, was determined to set the record straight, especially on the anniversary of Elvis' birth. He would have been 69 today. She simply couldn't bear to hear the stories about the aging Elvis' excesses. Repeatedly, she would tell reporters, "He was the finest boy you'd ever want to know."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1998
After eight years as a district supervisor of the United Methodist Church, the Rev. Bernard "Skip" Keels was in line for a plum assignment in a prestigious, "tall-steepled" church.But instead, he is headed back to the church where he started his career nearly 20 years ago -- St. Mark's, in a distressed Northwest Baltimore neighborhood at Liberty Heights Avenue and Garrison Boulevard.Keels isn't mad, hurt or disappointed. He's ecstatic."It's kind of unheard-of for people in those kinds of situations to want to return," said Keels, whose position is roughly equivalent to assistant bishop.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | July 24, 2007
Former colleagues of once-powerful state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell said they are saddened that he plans to plead guilty today to taking bribes while in office - and somewhat concerned that his behavior will tarnish the public perception of the General Assembly. Lawmakers say the Democratic senator's fall is painful to watch. His family is well-known in the General Assembly - his son, Eric, is in his second term in the House of Delegates - and many of his colleagues admired him as a man who rose from blue-collar roots to become a skilled politician.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | August 30, 2007
Two of the leading candidates for Baltimore City Council president -- Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake and Michael Sarbanes -- owe their political passions to fathers who rank among Maryland's top elected officials. Not so with candidate Kenneth N. Harris Sr., a two-term Baltimore City Councilman who never knew his father. The only common ground they ever shared was a Northeast Baltimore apartment complex where Harris lived 20 years ago and where the father he never met died in April. Harris, a 44-year-old two-term Democrat representing North-central Baltimore, has rarely woven the estrangement from his father into his political persona.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | July 24, 2007
Former colleagues of once-powerful state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell said they are saddened that he plans to plead guilty today to taking bribes while in office - and somewhat concerned that his behavior will tarnish the public perception of the General Assembly. Lawmakers say the Democratic senator's fall is painful to watch. His family is well-known in the General Assembly - his son, Eric, is in his second term in the House of Delegates - and many of his colleagues admired him as a man who rose from blue-collar roots to become a skilled politician.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,Sun Reporter | July 22, 2007
Confessions of a former Sex and the City addict: I secretly despised Carrie Bradshaw. Here was the country's most glam television character, a New York City newspaper columnist, parading around in the likes of Prada and Gucci and two holy Christians -- Dior and Louboutin. "A real journalist could never afford those clothes!" I'd scream at the television set. Believe me, I would know. So when I heard that Sarah Jessica Parker -- the actress who played Carrie on HBO's hit show -- was teaming up with discount chain Steve & Barry's to produce a line of low-cost, high-style clothing for women, I felt tremendously validated.
NEWS
by a sun reporter | April 29, 2007
The time, officially, to get from Houtzdale, Pa., to Maple Lawn is just four hours and change. But it took Paul Swidersky six decades. That he made it at all from the poor coal town in central Pennsylvania to luxurious Maple Lawn in Fulton, though, is remarkable. But his improbable journey was not achieved without risks, setbacks and luck. Perhaps more than anything, it was sheer determination that permitted Swidersky to escape the poverty and doubtful future of his hometown to end up with a multimillion-dollar business and expansive offices in one of the most fashionable destinations in Maryland.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 15, 2005
Batman begins? Hardly. Unlike Batman Begins, the $135 million movie opening in 3,700 of the nation's movie theaters today, the real beginning of Batman has nothing to do with big-budget Hollywood blockbusters set in far-off monasteries. It has to do with a couple of twentysomethings in the waning days of the Great Depression, struggling to make a go of it in the comics pages at a time when, if you weren't from the planet Krypton, you were nothin'. In 1938, Bob Kane was 23, a former New York street tough - his autobiography Batman & Me talks about having his hand broken by rival gang members, and his relief at having it heal sufficiently to let him continue drawing - who honed his craft at Cooper Union and the Art Students League.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | December 4, 2004
Horatio Alger has nothing on these guys. Fleeing post-revolutionary Cuba, Carlos M. Gutierrez began working for Kellogg's by selling cereal off his truck. He is now chief executive of the cereal giant. Abandoned by his mother at age 4, Bernard Kerik took a fat pay cut to be a beat cop in crime-riddled Times Square. He later played a key role in New York City's response to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Living in a two-bedroom house with seven siblings, Alberto Gonzales was raised by loving parents who were migrant workers and who never finished elementary school.
SPORTS
By Jerry Crowe, Tribune Newspapers | February 16, 2011
A Sunday drive in his vintage Ford Galaxie can't help but remind Adrian Smith of the 1966 NBA All-Star Game. Smith, an unlikely star among stars, won the gas-guzzling convertible as the game's most valuable player. Forty-five years later, it's still parked in his garage. "I was going to take it out today," Smith says from his home in Cincinnati, "but we're expecting bad weather. " The former guard, whose All-Star appearance in 1966 was his first and last in 11 pro seasons, still climbs behind the wheel for occasional freeway jaunts, gunning the powerful engine.
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Sun Staff Writer | October 4, 1994
A photograph in the Business section yesterday incorrectly identified the two founders of Giant Food Inc. Nehemiah M. Cohen was pictured on the right, and Samuel Lehrman was on the left.The Sun regrets the errors.The corporate union that gave birth to the largest supermarket chain in the region officially was torn asunder yesterday.The four grandchildren of Samuel Lehrman, who helped finance the first Giant Food store in Depression-era Washington, announced plans to sell their half of the voting stock in Giant Food Inc. to Britain's largest food retailer, J. Sainsbury PLC.The sale will end a 58-year-old relationship between the family of Nehemiah M. Cohen, a native of Palestine who immigrated to the United States in 1915, and the family of Mr. Lehrman, a Harrisburg, Pa., food wholesaler.
SPORTS
By Laura Vecsey | September 8, 2004
IN THIS far-flung world of sports journalism, your faithful correspondent has always hunted for tales of humble beginnings and humbled endings. And then there is Deion Sanders. I knew him when ... not that he cares. "Sorry, sis. Nothing personal. I only talk on Thursdays," Sanders said yesterday. Ah, to be Prime Timed not once, but twice, during an otherwise plausibly successful reporting career. Some of us were around 15 years ago when "Prime Time" took his show to The Show. Or, rather, took his show to the prelude to The Show.
NEWS
By Judy Fruchter Minkove | January 8, 2004
SHE WAS A reporter's dream, a guaranteed great story. Her compelling tales about Elvis riveted listeners. But they weren't merely tales. They were powerful anecdotes about a young man's character, and my mother, Jeannette Fruchter, was determined to set the record straight, especially on the anniversary of Elvis' birth. He would have been 69 today. She simply couldn't bear to hear the stories about the aging Elvis' excesses. Repeatedly, she would tell reporters, "He was the finest boy you'd ever want to know."
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