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Humanitarian Crisis

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By Riley McDonald and Riley McDonald,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 9, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said yesterday that Sudan is running out of time to halt the humanitarian crisis in its Darfur region. He warned of United Nations sanctions should the government fail to stop attacks on refugee camps. "Too many lives have already been lost," Powell said at a conference held by the Center for Strategic and International Studies. "We cannot lose any more time." More than 1 million Sudanese, most of them African Muslims, have been targeted by Arab militias known as the Janjaweed.
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NEWS
July 15, 2014
Most of the talking head shows have had some coverage of the immigration crisis, but they all talked from their political perspective and very few referred to any facts. I would like to surface some facts. Both parties are responsible for this crisis. It is very serious. It could bring about the end of the United States as we know it today. There are real dangers in what is happening for the people attempting to enter our country illegally, for our citizens and for the country itself.
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NEWS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2004
UNITED NATIONS - United Nations and Sudanese government officials agreed on steps to end the humanitarian emergency involving the killing and displacement of Darfur villagers, a plan that may defuse the threat of Security Council sanctions, a U.N. spokeswoman said yesterday. In the Sudanese capital of Khartoum, Foreign Minister Mustafa Osman Ismail and Jan Pronk, the U.N.'s top envoy to Darfur, negotiated "detailed steps to be taken to disarm the Janjaweed militia, improve security in Darfur and address the humanitarian crisis," the U.N.'s Denise Cook told reporters in New York.
NEWS
June 27, 2014
The administration tells us that the influx of illegal immigrants is an urgent humanitarian crisis, but it is not; rather it is an abject admission of failure to secure our borders ( "U.S. considering new Md. sites for immigrant children," June 17). Forcibly evicting homeless veterans from the squalor they're forced to call home is a humanitarian crisis. An administration that would frantically fall all over itself accommodating people entering this country illegally while ignoring those who honorably served and put their lives on the line in service of it has lost its moral compass and should be ashamed of itself.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 16, 1998
WASHINGTON -- While the world frets over India's high-tech nuclear-weapons tests, an old-style explosion of street rioting in Indonesia is posing a more immediate danger to America's stake in Asia.With 210 million people, billions of dollars in U.S. investment, close military ties with the United States and a strategic position astride vital sea lanes, Indonesia is a quiet giant that, if badly hurt, could damage the Pacific region and, by extension, the United States.Indonesia "is the core of Southeast Asian stability, on which the region's prosperity has rested for three decades," said James Clad, a professor of Southeast Asian studies at Georgetown University.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 10, 2003
WASHINGTON - As the Bush administration prepares to invade Iraq, deploying all the tools of war to the region, it is also sending water, food and medicine and bracing for a relief effort that could prove as challenging as the war itself. If not more so. President Bush has stressed that in case of war, the United States would provide emergency aid to Iraqi citizens, many of whom could lose access to food and water or decide to flee the country. But many envision a humanitarian crisis for which aid groups say they are ill-prepared.
NEWS
June 27, 2014
The administration tells us that the influx of illegal immigrants is an urgent humanitarian crisis, but it is not; rather it is an abject admission of failure to secure our borders ( "U.S. considering new Md. sites for immigrant children," June 17). Forcibly evicting homeless veterans from the squalor they're forced to call home is a humanitarian crisis. An administration that would frantically fall all over itself accommodating people entering this country illegally while ignoring those who honorably served and put their lives on the line in service of it has lost its moral compass and should be ashamed of itself.
NEWS
November 22, 2004
THE U.N. Security Council's journey to Nairobi last week culminated with a signed commitment between the government of Sudan and rebel leaders in the south to resolve the country's 21-year civil war by year's end. But the two sides made the same pledge last year. On a more pressing issue, the council's meeting -- its symbolic locale aside -- offered no indication that the humanitarian crisis in the Darfur region would end soon. Traveling to Africa may have been an extraordinary gesture to telegraph the United Nations' desire to stop the violence in Darfur.
NEWS
April 5, 2011
After reading Dan Rodricks ' "Despite tragedy, nuclear still way to go" (March 27), I am gratified that there are still thoughtful editorials and letters to the editor in support of nuclear power, despite the situation in Japan. Having had almost everything possible thrown at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, there are still no deaths connected to the damaged reactors, proving again that nuclear power generation is the safest form of energy known to date. Yet thanks to a not always benevolent Mother Nature, thousands of people are dead or injured, and the majority of media coverage has diverted national attention away from the Japanese people's needs and suffering to focus on the "nuclear disaster.
NEWS
March 11, 2003
Ehrlich favors polluters over the environment I read with interest various reports on the rejection of Lynn Y. Buhl for secretary of the environment by the Maryland Senate's Executive Nominations Committee and Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s response ("Ehrlich makes a final effort to gain Buhl's confirmation," March 8.) The governor's statement that environmental advocates would not have any seat at the table because of their opposition to Ms. Buhl's nomination is curious. The Sierra Club has been seeking a meeting with the governor since his election.
NEWS
By Scott Campbell | December 23, 2013
Chances are, unless you have a particular interest in the continent of Africa, you may have never heard of the Central African Republic. Even now you would have to be paying attention to international news for this landlocked country of 4.5 million to make a blip on your personal radar screen. But you should be paying attention because there is a humanitarian crisis of immense proportions occurring in the Central African Republic. Like too many countries on its continent, CAR - most refer to it by its initials - has been plagued by bad governance since gaining independence from France in 1958.
NEWS
April 5, 2011
After reading Dan Rodricks ' "Despite tragedy, nuclear still way to go" (March 27), I am gratified that there are still thoughtful editorials and letters to the editor in support of nuclear power, despite the situation in Japan. Having had almost everything possible thrown at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant, there are still no deaths connected to the damaged reactors, proving again that nuclear power generation is the safest form of energy known to date. Yet thanks to a not always benevolent Mother Nature, thousands of people are dead or injured, and the majority of media coverage has diverted national attention away from the Japanese people's needs and suffering to focus on the "nuclear disaster.
NEWS
January 15, 2009
Humanitarian crisis afflicts people of Gaza Under the heading "Equal rights for enemies?" (Commentary, Jan. 12), Allan Richarz offers an unqualified defense of Israel's attacks on Gaza and on Lebanon in 2006 and takes issue with the international condemnation of Israel's disproportionate violence. His arguments, although logical, overlook key aspects of the situation, perhaps because American media sources are so limited in their coverage of facts that are obvious to the rest of the world but uncomfortable for a staunchly pro-Israel U.S. government.
NEWS
By Terry Lawson and Terry Lawson,Detroit Free Press | August 5, 2007
Aserious-looking Don Cheadle stared out from one of the 20 covers of a recent issue of Vanity Fair, which is devoted to the plight of the African continent. It is a subject close to the heart of Cheadle, who won the respect of millions of filmgoers as Paul Rusesabagina, the hotel manager who saved hundreds of Tutsi refugees from slaughter by Hutu militants in Hotel Rwanda. More recently, Cheadle was in Darfur, Sudan, to make An Indifferent World, a documentary about the genocide there - the United Nations prefers the term "humanitarian crisis" - scheduled for release in October.
NEWS
By JOEL GREENBERG and JOEL GREENBERG,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 3, 2006
JERUSALEM -- Israel massed tanks and troops along Gaza's northern border early today, firing artillery and unleashing more airstrikes in a show of force after the prime minister ordered his army to "do all it can" to free an abducted soldier. At daybreak, a small force of Israeli tanks entered northern Gaza, but the military said it was a "limited" mission to find explosives and tunnels near the border fence. Prime Minister Ehud Olmert's warning signaled the government was losing patience with diplomatic efforts to end the week-old crisis over a captive soldier, Cpl. Gilad Shalit, 19, and was preparing for a possible escalation of its military offensive.
NEWS
November 22, 2004
THE U.N. Security Council's journey to Nairobi last week culminated with a signed commitment between the government of Sudan and rebel leaders in the south to resolve the country's 21-year civil war by year's end. But the two sides made the same pledge last year. On a more pressing issue, the council's meeting -- its symbolic locale aside -- offered no indication that the humanitarian crisis in the Darfur region would end soon. Traveling to Africa may have been an extraordinary gesture to telegraph the United Nations' desire to stop the violence in Darfur.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The partition of Bosnia into three ethnic areas could require the resettlement of 1.5 million to 2 million people, a classified State Department report says.The brief report, prepared early this month by the intelligence bureau of the State Department and based on a map drawn by President Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia, draws no conclusions about the desirability of carving up the country but assumes that masses of Serbs, Croats, and Muslims will move, either through coercion or by choice, State Department officials said.
NEWS
July 15, 2014
Most of the talking head shows have had some coverage of the immigration crisis, but they all talked from their political perspective and very few referred to any facts. I would like to surface some facts. Both parties are responsible for this crisis. It is very serious. It could bring about the end of the United States as we know it today. There are real dangers in what is happening for the people attempting to enter our country illegally, for our citizens and for the country itself.
NEWS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS SERVICE | August 6, 2004
UNITED NATIONS - United Nations and Sudanese government officials agreed on steps to end the humanitarian emergency involving the killing and displacement of Darfur villagers, a plan that may defuse the threat of Security Council sanctions, a U.N. spokeswoman said yesterday. In the Sudanese capital of Khartoum, Foreign Minister Mustafa Osman Ismail and Jan Pronk, the U.N.'s top envoy to Darfur, negotiated "detailed steps to be taken to disarm the Janjaweed militia, improve security in Darfur and address the humanitarian crisis," the U.N.'s Denise Cook told reporters in New York.
NEWS
By Riley McDonald and Riley McDonald,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 9, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said yesterday that Sudan is running out of time to halt the humanitarian crisis in its Darfur region. He warned of United Nations sanctions should the government fail to stop attacks on refugee camps. "Too many lives have already been lost," Powell said at a conference held by the Center for Strategic and International Studies. "We cannot lose any more time." More than 1 million Sudanese, most of them African Muslims, have been targeted by Arab militias known as the Janjaweed.
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