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NEWS
April 23, 2012
Unless I completely misinterpret this story ("Fatter folks, sicker bay," April 20), which is easy to do any time a "lefty" talks, it is a complete load of garbage! When the writer suggests that the health of the Chesapeake Bay is affected by the obesity of those who live near it, I have to respond that this is just another desperate attempt to lay blame on people, which usually is a precursor to another invasive law and a further erosion of freedom and liberty. He writes about a book he is reading by medical researchers and associates their findings with meanderings of his own mental deficiency and says, "It's intriguing to compare graphs these [Bay health]
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 8, 2013
"What's the second paragraph?" That is my boilerplate response when someone suggests a column idea to me. "Yeah. Right. But where do I go from there?" Not every topic is worth 700 words. So, today I will offer a few words on recent headlines in the news. Call it speed-opinionating. •Former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford, whose aides told everybody he was hiking the Appalachian Trail when he was in fact bedding his mistress in Argentina, has won the Republican primary for his old congressional seat.
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NEWS
June 25, 2012
The recent commentary by representatives of Senior Scientists and Policymakers for the Bay regarding poultry waste regulations was wrong in many ways ("No more half-measures," June 18). They are correct that more people and their pollution will stress our environment. More people will reverse the progress that agriculture is making. TheU.S. Environmental Protection Agencyreports that agriculture has made tremendous progress in reducing nutrient contributions to the Chesapeake Bay. Urban and suburban sectors are getting worse.
NEWS
September 23, 2012
Let me get this straight: a spontaneous movement arises and takes up the name "Tea Party" based on historical actions and the acronym "taxed enough already," amasses a very large number of either followers or sympathizers, and literally reverses the party breakdown in the U.S. House of Representatives and state-level assemblies, but it is not worth receiving any reporting. When it is reported upon, the items are buried deep within the pages of The Sun and are usually flippant or derogatory in nature.
NEWS
October 10, 2011
I could not help but shake my head when reading the article regarding Dobbins Island, a private property that is being totally abused by the uncaring public ("Islet at center of battle over private versus public rights," Oct. 6). This island, which once consisted of 13.5 acres, has been vandalized and diminished by persons trespassing there, perhaps completely unaware of the damage they have caused. They talk of romantic evenings by a bonfire on the beach. Ah, yes, with bushes and branches broken off nearby vegetation, adding to the erosion that has left that island reduced now to 7.2 acres.
NEWS
September 23, 2012
Let me get this straight: a spontaneous movement arises and takes up the name "Tea Party" based on historical actions and the acronym "taxed enough already," amasses a very large number of either followers or sympathizers, and literally reverses the party breakdown in the U.S. House of Representatives and state-level assemblies, but it is not worth receiving any reporting. When it is reported upon, the items are buried deep within the pages of The Sun and are usually flippant or derogatory in nature.
NEWS
By Mark Coleman and Mark Coleman,Los Angeles Times | October 22, 2006
The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic - and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World Steven Johnson Riverhead Books / 302 pages / $26.95 If every great city resembles a living organism, then mid-19th century London was an ungainly and careless youthful giant with appalling personal habits. As Steven Johnson makes nauseatingly clear in the grim and gripping early pages of The Ghost Map, the stench of human excrement was everywhere. Forget about sanitary engineering and the modern science of waste management.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | April 8, 2013
"What's the second paragraph?" That is my boilerplate response when someone suggests a column idea to me. "Yeah. Right. But where do I go from there?" Not every topic is worth 700 words. So, today I will offer a few words on recent headlines in the news. Call it speed-opinionating. •Former South Carolina Gov. Mark Sanford, whose aides told everybody he was hiking the Appalachian Trail when he was in fact bedding his mistress in Argentina, has won the Republican primary for his old congressional seat.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Joe Nawrozki and Nancy A. Youssef and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1999
As horrified residents watched from darkened apartments, Linda Whitfield-Ugboaja knelt in a trash-strewn alley and pleaded for her life. Her executioner paused, then shot her repeatedly in the head, ending a dispute in a flourishing Dundalk drug market.The killing last month -- in a troubled two-block stretch of World War II-era apartments on Yorkway -- stunned even those numbed to the nightly crackle of gunfire and wailing police sirens.It also proved to be a turning point for the neighborhood.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1998
Columbia's much-beloved community pools are becoming communal toilets, as nine incidents in the last three weeks have temporarily shut down four pools.Although Columbia Association officials say every summer there are occasional accidents -- usually by infants or toddlers -- this year is unusual."We are experiencing what we think is an excessive [number] of fecal accidents," said John Herdson, aquatics director for the association, which runs the community's 23 outdoor pools. "We've had occasional accidents, but this many is an abnormality."
NEWS
June 25, 2012
The recent commentary by representatives of Senior Scientists and Policymakers for the Bay regarding poultry waste regulations was wrong in many ways ("No more half-measures," June 18). They are correct that more people and their pollution will stress our environment. More people will reverse the progress that agriculture is making. TheU.S. Environmental Protection Agencyreports that agriculture has made tremendous progress in reducing nutrient contributions to the Chesapeake Bay. Urban and suburban sectors are getting worse.
NEWS
April 23, 2012
Unless I completely misinterpret this story ("Fatter folks, sicker bay," April 20), which is easy to do any time a "lefty" talks, it is a complete load of garbage! When the writer suggests that the health of the Chesapeake Bay is affected by the obesity of those who live near it, I have to respond that this is just another desperate attempt to lay blame on people, which usually is a precursor to another invasive law and a further erosion of freedom and liberty. He writes about a book he is reading by medical researchers and associates their findings with meanderings of his own mental deficiency and says, "It's intriguing to compare graphs these [Bay health]
NEWS
October 10, 2011
I could not help but shake my head when reading the article regarding Dobbins Island, a private property that is being totally abused by the uncaring public ("Islet at center of battle over private versus public rights," Oct. 6). This island, which once consisted of 13.5 acres, has been vandalized and diminished by persons trespassing there, perhaps completely unaware of the damage they have caused. They talk of romantic evenings by a bonfire on the beach. Ah, yes, with bushes and branches broken off nearby vegetation, adding to the erosion that has left that island reduced now to 7.2 acres.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | May 28, 2009
On the average day, Hugh Pocock burns just under half of the 8 pounds of food he eats and wastes the rest. The process of uncovering this specific bit of information about his own machinery may not be breakfast conversation. It involved meticulous weighing of all that went in his mouth and all that came out the other end for 63 days, calculating the difference and logging the findings. Pocock was not getting even with his wife for nagging him about leaving the seat up. Nor was he responding badly to potty-training his son. An artist and professor at Maryland Institute College of Art, he wanted to learn specifically what it takes to fuel his body and, more globally, explore man's relationship to the production of energy and the use and waste of natural resources.
NEWS
By Mark Coleman and Mark Coleman,Los Angeles Times | October 22, 2006
The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic - and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World Steven Johnson Riverhead Books / 302 pages / $26.95 If every great city resembles a living organism, then mid-19th century London was an ungainly and careless youthful giant with appalling personal habits. As Steven Johnson makes nauseatingly clear in the grim and gripping early pages of The Ghost Map, the stench of human excrement was everywhere. Forget about sanitary engineering and the modern science of waste management.
NEWS
By Nancy A. Youssef and Joe Nawrozki and Nancy A. Youssef and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1999
As horrified residents watched from darkened apartments, Linda Whitfield-Ugboaja knelt in a trash-strewn alley and pleaded for her life. Her executioner paused, then shot her repeatedly in the head, ending a dispute in a flourishing Dundalk drug market.The killing last month -- in a troubled two-block stretch of World War II-era apartments on Yorkway -- stunned even those numbed to the nightly crackle of gunfire and wailing police sirens.It also proved to be a turning point for the neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | May 28, 2009
On the average day, Hugh Pocock burns just under half of the 8 pounds of food he eats and wastes the rest. The process of uncovering this specific bit of information about his own machinery may not be breakfast conversation. It involved meticulous weighing of all that went in his mouth and all that came out the other end for 63 days, calculating the difference and logging the findings. Pocock was not getting even with his wife for nagging him about leaving the seat up. Nor was he responding badly to potty-training his son. An artist and professor at Maryland Institute College of Art, he wanted to learn specifically what it takes to fuel his body and, more globally, explore man's relationship to the production of energy and the use and waste of natural resources.
NEWS
June 15, 1992
Residents can gain easy access to weekly water quality reports on the county's creeks through a county Health Department telephone service.The service, established last year, was reactivated May 25. It provides residents with the number of fecal coliforms measured in specific creeks. The information is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, at 222-7999.Fecal coliform is a bacteria found in the intestines of all warm-blooded animals. Because of its prevalence and because it is easy to detect, it is used as one measure of water quality.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1998
Columbia's much-beloved community pools are becoming communal toilets, as nine incidents in the last three weeks have temporarily shut down four pools.Although Columbia Association officials say every summer there are occasional accidents -- usually by infants or toddlers -- this year is unusual."We are experiencing what we think is an excessive [number] of fecal accidents," said John Herdson, aquatics director for the association, which runs the community's 23 outdoor pools. "We've had occasional accidents, but this many is an abnormality."
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