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NEWS
October 12, 1999
Milt Jackson,76, a jazz vibraphonist who made the instrument sing like the human voice as a longtime member of the Modern Jazz Quartet, died of liver cancer Saturday at a Manhattan hospital.One of the best improvisers in jazz and an outstanding blues player, Mr. Jackson originally was a singer in a Detroit gospel quartet. In the 1940s, he created a new sound by slowing the motor on his Deagan Vibraharp's oscillator to a third of the speed of Lionel Hampton's. The result was a warm, smoky sound with a vibrato approximating his singing.
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NEWS
November 8, 2008
Studs Terkel, who died on the last day of October at his home in Chicago, made an art of oral history. He was a character and a treasure and, in his own words, a uniquely American voice. What has happened to the human voice? Vox Humana. Hollering, shouting, quiet talking, buzz. I was leaving the airport, this is in Atlanta. You know, you leave the gate, you take a train that took you to concourse of your choice. And I get into this train. Dead silence. Few people seated or standing. Up above you hear a voice.
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NEWS
November 8, 2008
Studs Terkel, who died on the last day of October at his home in Chicago, made an art of oral history. He was a character and a treasure and, in his own words, a uniquely American voice. What has happened to the human voice? Vox Humana. Hollering, shouting, quiet talking, buzz. I was leaving the airport, this is in Atlanta. You know, you leave the gate, you take a train that took you to concourse of your choice. And I get into this train. Dead silence. Few people seated or standing. Up above you hear a voice.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 25, 2008
Among the memorable, music-related moments in Mayberry, on the classic TV sitcom The Andy Griffith Show, is when a jealous Deputy Barney Fife tries to talk a golden-voiced bumpkin-type named Rafe Hollister out of entering the town's singing contest. Barney: "They're liable to ask you questions only a trained musician understands. Rafe: Like what? Barney: Well, suppose they was to ask, "Can you sing a cappella?" Would you know what to do? Rafe: No. Barney: There you are. Why get up and embarrass yourself?
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | February 19, 1995
From The Sun Feb. 19-25, 1845Feb. 21: Whenever we smell musk, we suspect an absence of soap. Cold bathing and soap every day are more important than cologne. There is no beauty like that of the human face -- no melody like that of the human voice -- no sweetness to be compared with that of the human skin, if it is only washed.Feb. 24: All the signs indicate that "the winter is over and gone," and that we are to have an early spring.From The Sun Feb. 19-25, 1895Feb. 19: Yesterday was the centennial of the birth of George Peabody, the American philanthropist, who gave millions for the advancement of education and science in this country.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | October 5, 1990
PBS' "GREAT PERFORMANCES" kicks off its 18th season tonight with a refreshing reach beyond its normal range, which is usually restricted to the traditionally circumscribed notions of high culture.But tonight, instead of Zubin Mehta or Joan Sutherland, you get Spike Lee and Debbie Allen. And instead of symphonies or ballets, you get a sound as natural as a breeze in the trees, as gritty as the banging of a trash can on an inner city street -- a cappella music. "Spike & Co.: Do It A Cappella" will be on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67, tonight at 9 o'clock.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 3, 1999
The tape-recorded voice on the telephone thanks me for my patience. What patience? The voice must be confusing me with somebody else, somebody whose TCI cable TV service actually works, this being two weeks since Hurricane Floyd, this also being more than a week since all BGE power has been returned, this being long enough that power has been restored in parts of Taiwan, so what's the problem in Baltimore?But the voice on the TCI line thanks me for my patience, because this is what it has been programmed to do. It's the modern way. You pick up a telephone, which is a machine, and you dial a number that connects you not to a human being but to another machine, a machine that placates you with false flattery, and this is what we call progress.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | May 4, 1997
NOW THAT WE'VE all misdialed our phone calls a half dozen times, I have an observation to offer. What good does it do to dial a phone these days? The chances are you'll never get a human voice to greet you.In time, I'll get accustomed to the 410-301 business. This isn't the first time I've experienced a change in phone usage. After all, didn't we have to shed all those distinctive names of the old telephone exchanges like Saratoga, Homewood, Tuxedo, and Forest? I don't really miss those cumbersome calls from the long-distance operator saying that she had a call from Lock Haven on the wire.
NEWS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | August 22, 1992
Phone home.If all goes according to plan, that's all you'll have to say to call home next year, when Bell Atlantic Corp. expects to add "voice recognition" to its ever-growing family of services.Voice-recognition technology allows computers to recognize human speech, eliminating the need for computer keyboards, telephone keypads and -- yes -- all those multidigit codes you now must remember to gain access to everything from voice mailboxes to speed dialing services."The problem now is that people forget the codes.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | May 25, 2008
Among the memorable, music-related moments in Mayberry, on the classic TV sitcom The Andy Griffith Show, is when a jealous Deputy Barney Fife tries to talk a golden-voiced bumpkin-type named Rafe Hollister out of entering the town's singing contest. Barney: "They're liable to ask you questions only a trained musician understands. Rafe: Like what? Barney: Well, suppose they was to ask, "Can you sing a cappella?" Would you know what to do? Rafe: No. Barney: There you are. Why get up and embarrass yourself?
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2004
NEW YORK - This is it. It's real. A decades-old doctoral dissertation has grown into an actual product supported by a fledgling company, which on this early autumn day is being unveiled in a windowless ballroom several stories above the cab-choked streets of Times Square. The guys from Sonum Technologies Inc. are confident, but fidgety. They stand in their booth at the conference, jackets on, feet spread apart, eyes scanning the moving mass of vendors and middle-managers - a legion in golf shirts and dark suits.
NEWS
October 12, 1999
Milt Jackson,76, a jazz vibraphonist who made the instrument sing like the human voice as a longtime member of the Modern Jazz Quartet, died of liver cancer Saturday at a Manhattan hospital.One of the best improvisers in jazz and an outstanding blues player, Mr. Jackson originally was a singer in a Detroit gospel quartet. In the 1940s, he created a new sound by slowing the motor on his Deagan Vibraharp's oscillator to a third of the speed of Lionel Hampton's. The result was a warm, smoky sound with a vibrato approximating his singing.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | October 3, 1999
The tape-recorded voice on the telephone thanks me for my patience. What patience? The voice must be confusing me with somebody else, somebody whose TCI cable TV service actually works, this being two weeks since Hurricane Floyd, this also being more than a week since all BGE power has been returned, this being long enough that power has been restored in parts of Taiwan, so what's the problem in Baltimore?But the voice on the TCI line thanks me for my patience, because this is what it has been programmed to do. It's the modern way. You pick up a telephone, which is a machine, and you dial a number that connects you not to a human being but to another machine, a machine that placates you with false flattery, and this is what we call progress.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | May 4, 1997
NOW THAT WE'VE all misdialed our phone calls a half dozen times, I have an observation to offer. What good does it do to dial a phone these days? The chances are you'll never get a human voice to greet you.In time, I'll get accustomed to the 410-301 business. This isn't the first time I've experienced a change in phone usage. After all, didn't we have to shed all those distinctive names of the old telephone exchanges like Saratoga, Homewood, Tuxedo, and Forest? I don't really miss those cumbersome calls from the long-distance operator saying that she had a call from Lock Haven on the wire.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | February 19, 1995
From The Sun Feb. 19-25, 1845Feb. 21: Whenever we smell musk, we suspect an absence of soap. Cold bathing and soap every day are more important than cologne. There is no beauty like that of the human face -- no melody like that of the human voice -- no sweetness to be compared with that of the human skin, if it is only washed.Feb. 24: All the signs indicate that "the winter is over and gone," and that we are to have an early spring.From The Sun Feb. 19-25, 1895Feb. 19: Yesterday was the centennial of the birth of George Peabody, the American philanthropist, who gave millions for the advancement of education and science in this country.
NEWS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | August 22, 1992
Phone home.If all goes according to plan, that's all you'll have to say to call home next year, when Bell Atlantic Corp. expects to add "voice recognition" to its ever-growing family of services.Voice-recognition technology allows computers to recognize human speech, eliminating the need for computer keyboards, telephone keypads and -- yes -- all those multidigit codes you now must remember to gain access to everything from voice mailboxes to speed dialing services."The problem now is that people forget the codes.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2004
NEW YORK - This is it. It's real. A decades-old doctoral dissertation has grown into an actual product supported by a fledgling company, which on this early autumn day is being unveiled in a windowless ballroom several stories above the cab-choked streets of Times Square. The guys from Sonum Technologies Inc. are confident, but fidgety. They stand in their booth at the conference, jackets on, feet spread apart, eyes scanning the moving mass of vendors and middle-managers - a legion in golf shirts and dark suits.
FEATURES
March 27, 1998
What does...Quartz have to do with telling time?Michael WileySan Jose, Calif.Some crystals will vibrate when an electric current flows througthem. They vibrate at predictable speeds. A watch vibrates the quartz and then counts up the vibrations. Every 30,000 vibrations or so equals 1 second.If, Then...If water is made from hydrogen and oxygen, whydoesn't it burn?George HarrisMesquite, TexasThe oxygen and hydrogen in water are bonded together as molecule. It takes an enormous amountof energy to pull those bonds apart.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | October 5, 1990
PBS' "GREAT PERFORMANCES" kicks off its 18th season tonight with a refreshing reach beyond its normal range, which is usually restricted to the traditionally circumscribed notions of high culture.But tonight, instead of Zubin Mehta or Joan Sutherland, you get Spike Lee and Debbie Allen. And instead of symphonies or ballets, you get a sound as natural as a breeze in the trees, as gritty as the banging of a trash can on an inner city street -- a cappella music. "Spike & Co.: Do It A Cappella" will be on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67, tonight at 9 o'clock.
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