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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | February 12, 1993
Music, poetry, art and politics -- all for $5."It'll be a one-room Lollapalooza," promises Greg Schmoke, referring to the traveling alternative rock festival of the past two summers.Mr. Schmoke -- yes, the son of Mayor Kurt L. -- is one of the organizers of a benefit for HERO, the Baltimore-based AIDS resource organization, at The Bank tonight. The benefit will hTC feature several local bands, poetry readings, an art exhibit and informational booths.Among the performers will be Mr. Schmoke's own 1-year-old band, Legion Lost, which plays a hybrid of psychedelic rock, jazz and reggae.
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NEWS
April 1, 2013
A new report by the National Patient Safety Foundation published in the AMA News found that health care workers are toiling in hazardous environments where they are subjected to physical and verbal abuse from colleagues and exposed to relentless stress generated by administrative greed. The push to see more patients in less time has placed doctors and nurses at breaking point. Many are burning out and losing the joy inherent in practicing a humane profession. The patient-doctor relationship has been decimated with insurers and the government playing doctor in lieu of health-care providers.
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BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | January 24, 1994
During the last few days of 1993, I received several calls in response to my column on year-end charitable gifts. Most of the callers buzzed with joy about unexpected year-end gifts, some in the six and seven figures and nearly all involving appreciated property.Those gifts were in apparent response to the Clinton administration's recent tax-code changes that favor charitable gifts of such property for people affected by the Alternative Minimum Tax.One of my favorite calls came from Helen London, executive director of Central Scholarship Bureau (CSB)
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 30, 2012
This was going to be a rant. Then I thought about it, which was a mistake. As any experienced ranter can tell you, thinking about it has the unfortunate tendency of turning a good, clean rant into a muddy quagmire of fine points, conditional sentences, and digressions as delicately balanced as a Swiss watch. You want to flambe the target of your ire, but you find yourself conscience-bound to admit: Maybe your target has a point. Such was the case last week when California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law legalizing self-driving cars in the Golden State.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,SUN ART CRITIC | June 30, 1997
Cambodian sculpture seems to have sprung fully developed into the world, like Athena from the forehead of Zeus, and its vitality continued for a thousand years. It was rooted in Hinduism and Buddhism, and people unfamiliar with those faiths inevitably will fail to fully comprehend its religious nature. Even so, to see these works is to recognize them as one of the supreme artistic achievements of mankind.The exhibit, "Sculpture of Angkor and Ancient Cambodia" at Washington's National Gallery of Art, opened yesterday, bringing together 100 works, almost all from the world's two premier collections: the National Museum of Cambodia in Phnom Penh and the Musee Guimet in Paris.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and Mary Corey and J.D. Considine and Mary Corey,Staff Writers | March 5, 1992
If two new Bruce Springsteen albums at the end of March strikes fans as a feast, the new Springsteen single arriving in record stores today must be an appetizer. The cassette-only release culls one song from each of the albums: "Human Touch" from "Human Touch" and "Better Days" from "Lucky Town."Both began receiving radio airplay yesterday. WBSB-FM (Variety 104.3) plans to play "Human Touch" every few hours, adding tTC "Better Days" soon. "People want to hear it," said program director Todd Fisher.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | January 24, 1992
Bruce Springsteen is expecting in April, and it's going to be twins.Twin albums, that is.After months of rumor and speculation, it was announced yesterday that two new Springsteen albums -- "Human Touch" and "Lucky Town" -- will be released simultaneously this spring. Although an exact delivery date could not be confirmed, the albums are expected to arrive in record stores in early April, according to a statement issued by Springsteen's publicist and Columbia Records."I'm excited about being finished," Springsteen is quoted as saying in the statement, but he's probably no where near as excited as his fans.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | January 24, 1992
Bruce Springsteen is expecting in April, and it's going to be twins.Twin albums, that is.After months of rumor and speculation, it was announced yesterday that two new Springsteen albums -- "Human Touch" and "Lucky Town" -- will be released simultaneously this spring. Although an exact delivery date could not be confirmed, the albums are expected to arrive in record stores in early April, according to a statement issued by Springsteen's publicist and Columbia Records."I'm excited about being finished," Springsteen is quoted as saying in the statement, but he's probably no where near as excited as his fans.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 6, 1992
"Human Touch," the long-awaited new single from Bruce Springsteen, finally shipped to record stores yesterday. But much to the dismay of Baltimore retailers, that shipment never arrived locally."We've had a lot of requests," said Tammy, a part-time clerk at Record & Tape Traders in Towson, who declined to give her last name, "but we haven't had it in our store yet. We're hoping it will be here [today]."Nor were there any Springsteen singles to be found at the Rotunda outlet of Recordmasters.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 6, 1992
"Human Touch," the long-awaited new single from Bruce Springsteen, finally was shipped to record stores yesterday. But much to the dismay of Baltimore retailers, that shipment never arrived locally."We've had a lot of requests," said Tammy, a part-time clerk at Record & Tape Traders in Towson, who declined to give her last name, "but we haven't had it in our store yet. We're hoping it will be here [today]."Nor were there any Springsteen singles to be found at the hTC Rotunda outlet of Recordmasters.
NEWS
September 16, 2012
For the second time in recent weeks, The Baltimore Sun has highlighted the Department of Human Resources' "Ready by 21" program as evidence of significant strides in how Maryland is looking at new ways of improving the lives of youth aging out of foster care ("Ready for life," Sept. 4). As providers of services for children placed by both by DHR and the Department of Juvenile Services, we couldn't help but be struck by one particularly profound statement in The Sun's editorial: "Most of all, what the state's foster care system needs more of [is]
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2010
When Stephen Pitcairn cried for help that night, Reggie Higgins answered. Higgins, who had just returned home to Charles Village from a trip, ran into the street and, seeing Pitcairn on the ground and bleeding from his chest, started screaming for help himself. He called for his neighbors by name — "Jacques!" "Regina!" — and ran back inside briefly to call 911. In the end, though, only Higgins would be there for Pitcairn, two strangers on St. Paul Street as cars drove by and nearby residents slept behind the aural wall of their air conditioners.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN REPORTER | January 11, 2008
The animals are toast. Humans rule. If 41 years of Super Bowl history can be used as a gauge, the Patriots, Packers, Cowboys or Giants will beat the Colts, Seahawks or Jaguars in the season's ultimate game Feb. 3. Unless, of course, the Chargers upset all carbon-based life forms, not to mention Las Vegas oddsmakers. Since the first Super Bowl in January 1967, teams with manly names have triumphed 31 times while teams named after animals have won nine. The Green Bay Packers kicked off human dominance with back-to-back wins, beating two other virile teams, the Kansas City Chiefs and the Oakland Raiders.
NEWS
By Seth Lloyd and Seth Lloyd,Los Angeles Times | February 25, 2007
The Human Touch: Our Part in the Creation of a Universe Michael Frayn Metropolitan Books / 506 pages / $32.50 Michael Frayn is known as a playwright (Noises Off, Copenhagen) and novelist (Headlong, Spies). But this prolific British author is also a philosopher, having studied philosophy at Cambridge in the 1950s. The Human Touch is a profound, personal account of his work on a range of topics, beginning (and ending) with the philosophy of consciousness and passing through the nature of physical law, the problem of free will, the relationship of language and thought to reality and the origin of the universe.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2000
Tahira S. Thomas, Anne Arundel County's animal control administrator, points to the euthanasia room in the county's new animal control shelter. She envisions clouds painted on yellow walls and the table and chair where people will say goodbye to their pets. "This," she said, "is my most important room." The new shelter in Millersville opens tomorrow. Yesterday, about 40 dogs, 30 cats and one python, one pheasant and one iguana were moved there from the old shelter in Glen Burnie. The animals were put in cages, transported a few miles in animal control vans and carefully placed in new, roomier cages at the shelter.
NEWS
October 20, 2000
ACCOUNTABILITY IN education can be like the weather: Wait 20 minutes and it changes. Now comes a change agent. Howard County's new superintendent, John R. O'Rourke, proffers an approach that breaks through the buzzwords, an idea other educators should consider. He wants to put names on the test results -- not for publication, of course, but to focus on the objective: helping young people learn. Too often, school systems allow themselves to be fixated on their standing in relation to a goal or to other systems.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 29, 1992
No matter how you look at it, Bruce Springsteen has gone through a lot in the last four and a half years.First his marriage, which seemed the centerpiece of his last album, "Tunnel of Love," shattered like a fumbled 45 whenSpringsteen left actress-model Julianne Phillips for bandmate Patti Scialfa, who not only became the new Mrs. S. but also the mother of his son (Evan James) and daughter (Jessica Rae).Then, as if the upheavals in his personal life weren't trauma enough, Springsteen up and fired the E St. Band.
NEWS
By Seth Lloyd and Seth Lloyd,Los Angeles Times | February 25, 2007
The Human Touch: Our Part in the Creation of a Universe Michael Frayn Metropolitan Books / 506 pages / $32.50 Michael Frayn is known as a playwright (Noises Off, Copenhagen) and novelist (Headlong, Spies). But this prolific British author is also a philosopher, having studied philosophy at Cambridge in the 1950s. The Human Touch is a profound, personal account of his work on a range of topics, beginning (and ending) with the philosophy of consciousness and passing through the nature of physical law, the problem of free will, the relationship of language and thought to reality and the origin of the universe.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Kurt Streeter and Ann LoLordo and Kurt Streeter,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2000
Morris High School opened in 1902 as a neo-Gothic cathedral of learning. But when Carmen V. Russo arrived for her first day as principal, she found a run-down fortress, a school surrounded by blight whose students were considered too poor, too South Bronx to perform Shakespeare. Graffiti marred the streets in the school's neighborhood, where the Latin Kings, the Zulus and the Dominican Power gangs guarded their turf. Garbage was strewn behind Morris. Broken bottles littered its playground.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | August 29, 1999
When Bruce Springsteen and the E St. Band roll into Washington's MCI Arena on Tuesday for the first of three sold-out shows, I'm sure that fans will be expecting an electrifying evening. I'm equally sure that Springsteen and com-pany will meet those expectations, delivering the sort of energetic, uplifting, joyful performance that has made this tour the season's hottest ticket. And I'm sure everyone in attendance will feel they got their money's worth and then some.I'm just not sure how much any of that means.
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