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By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | May 5, 2004
Within the past nine months, two respected human rights groups released reports describing what they said was the abuse of U.S.-held prisoners in Afghanistan, including instances of beatings, sleep deprivation and, in a small number of cases, killings of detainees. The conditions that they described are roughly similar to those now under investigation at U.S.-run detention centers in Iraq. But the reports from Afghanistan received little attention when they were published. Yesterday, the Army acknowledged that 20 investigations were under way into prisoner assaults and deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan.
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NEWS
March 28, 2014
The Sun recently published extensive, highly negative but unchallenged remarks about Israel made by Richard Falk, who is identified in the story as an unbiased UN human rights investigator monitoring Israel's treatment of Palestinians ("U.N. investigator accuses Israel of 'ethnic cleansing,'" March 22). Yet nowhere are Mr. Falk's deep-seated anti-Israel and anti-Western biases noted in the more than 750-word article. Among its many omissions, the article failed to mention that Mr. Falk was chastised by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon for saying the U.S. has covered up its own involvement in the 9/11 attack and that the Boston Marathon bombing was understandable "blowback" for American policies in the Muslim world.
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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 1, 1997
WASHINGTON -- International donors have pumped an estimated $3 million in reconstruction aid into a Bosnian Serb town run by a rogues' gallery of war crimes suspects, conferring a semblance of respectability on town leaders and undercutting investigations by the United Nations war crimes tribunal, a watchdog group says.In a 70-page report, Human Rights Watch says the mayor, deputy mayor, police chief, hospital director and director of a local organization claiming to be the Red Cross were all deeply implicated in "ethnic cleansing" in Prijedor, a town in northwest Bosnia.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
When the winter Olympics gets underway next month in Sochi, Russia, Under Armour's logo will be seen by millions of viewers around the globe as the Baltimore-based brand sponsors two U.S. teams and another from Canada. The Olympic sponsorships - the greatest exposure yet for Under Armour at any winter games - could pay off not only in brand awareness, but in stronger sales and profits, company officials say. They hope wins by sponsored athletes or even just the exposure will reinforce the company's mantra of "making all athletes better" in consumers' minds.
NEWS
December 5, 2004
A PROMINENT JAMAICAN gay rights activist is brutally murdered one June morning, and a crowd gathers to rejoice and sing "Boom Bye Bye," a popular reggae song about killing gay men. Nine days later, another gay man is "chopped, stabbed and stoned to death" by an angry mob egged on by police officers who, according to a witness, told them to "beat him because him a battyman," local slang for homosexual. Days later, six men are driven from their home and beaten by a group of angry men. When they report the crime to police, officers nearly laugh them out of the station.
NEWS
June 17, 2000
THE NATION'S war on drugs has been selective. While police arrest an increasingly large number of blacks on drug charges, they have failed to catch and convict white drug dealers. Blacks are punished far more often than whites on drug charges nationwide. In Maryland, an astounding 90 percent of those serving time on drug charges are black, according to a report by Human Rights Watch. This disparity would seem fair if nine of 10 drug sellers were black, but they aren't. A survey cited in the Human Rights Watch report found that 82 percent of admitted drug sellers were white.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2010
George Soros, one of the richest men on the planet, has given more than $8 billion to charities in Baltimore and around the world. Last week, he made headlines with one of his biggest gifts ever — $100 million to the Human Rights Watch. The billionaire investor and philanthropist is known for supporting liberal causes, and the Human Rights Watch donation is aimed at expanding the advocacy group's geographic reach and donor base. In Baltimore, Soros also is known for opening an Open Society Institute office more than a decade ago to study the causes of persistent poverty and invest in solutions.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
Federal prosecutors twice offered suspected heroin trafficker Roy Clay a deal: plead guilty and serve 10 years. Clay turned them down. When a jury found him guilty, a reluctant judge had no choice but to send him to prison for life. Because prosecutors had brought up two previous drug convictions in his case, Clay was subject to an "enhanced mandatory minimum" at his sentencing in August. Many other defendants, facing similar prospects in federal court, have elected to make a deal.
NEWS
By MARK MAGNIER and MARK MAGNIER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 17, 2006
BEIJING -- A psychiatric examination performed on a former patient held for 13 years in a police-run Chinese mental hospital has concluded that there was no cause for his detention, human rights groups said yesterday in condemning Beijing's political abuse of psychiatry. Dutch psychiatrists who tested Wang Wanxing, 56, over a two-day period early this year found nothing wrong with him after he was released from a type of mental institution known as ankang, or "peace and health," according to the Netherlands-based Global Initiative on Psychiatry, a civic group that sponsored the exam.
NEWS
By Jim Sollisch | April 26, 2001
CLEVELAND -- If you knew of evidence that prisoners in American jails were being routinely tortured, what would you do? Would you write your elected officials? What if I told you that one study found 22 percent of the prisoners doing time in Nebraska were tortured during their incarceration? And another study of seven prisons in four states puts the number at 21 percent. Would you write Amnesty International? Would you at least be morally outraged? Before we go any further, let me confess that I've used the word "torture" in place of the word "rape."
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
Federal prosecutors twice offered suspected heroin trafficker Roy Clay a deal: plead guilty and serve 10 years. Clay turned them down. When a jury found him guilty, a reluctant judge had no choice but to send him to prison for life. Because prosecutors had brought up two previous drug convictions in his case, Clay was subject to an "enhanced mandatory minimum" at his sentencing in August. Many other defendants, facing similar prospects in federal court, have elected to make a deal.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2011
As described by those who know him, Matthew VanDyke comes off as footloose and maybe a little feckless. He has worked sporadically, sometimes getting freelance writing or teaching gigs but more often traveling to the Middle East for months at a time with plans to do something, someday, with his jottings and photography. Leaving Baltimore for Libya last February was entirely in keeping with his wanderings. VanDyke wanted to support friends he'd made on a previous trip. They had gotten caught up in the uprising against the country's longtime strongman, Moammar Gadhafi, and the 32-year-old took his camera and netbook computer to capture the unfolding drama.
NEWS
By Suzanne O'Hatnick | September 8, 2011
The images of the burning towers on Sept. 11 are seared into our collective memory. It seemed unthinkable that we could be attacked on our native soil. During our nation's founding, we were also attacked on our soil. And though the British who captured our fighters treated their prisoners brutally, Gen. George Washington instructed his troops to act with integrity. "Treat them with humanity, and let them have no reason to complain of our copying the brutal example of the British Army in their treatment of our unfortunate brethren who have fallen into their hands," he told the Northern Expeditionary Force in September 1775.
NEWS
June 3, 2011
The Syrian government's increasingly brutal crackdown on peaceful protesters is putting the Obama administration's revamped Middle East policy to its first real test. It's one thing to say U.S. policy toward the region should spring from America's core values of democracy, freedom and support for human rights, but it's quite another to put those ideals into practice in the real world. In his speech last month about the upheaval sweeping Arab countries, Mr. Obama conceded that in the past America's short-term interests in maintaining regional stability had often trumped its commitment to democratic reform.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2010
George Soros, one of the richest men on the planet, has given more than $8 billion to charities in Baltimore and around the world. Last week, he made headlines with one of his biggest gifts ever — $100 million to the Human Rights Watch. The billionaire investor and philanthropist is known for supporting liberal causes, and the Human Rights Watch donation is aimed at expanding the advocacy group's geographic reach and donor base. In Baltimore, Soros also is known for opening an Open Society Institute office more than a decade ago to study the causes of persistent poverty and invest in solutions.
NEWS
By MARK MAGNIER and MARK MAGNIER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 17, 2006
BEIJING -- A psychiatric examination performed on a former patient held for 13 years in a police-run Chinese mental hospital has concluded that there was no cause for his detention, human rights groups said yesterday in condemning Beijing's political abuse of psychiatry. Dutch psychiatrists who tested Wang Wanxing, 56, over a two-day period early this year found nothing wrong with him after he was released from a type of mental institution known as ankang, or "peace and health," according to the Netherlands-based Global Initiative on Psychiatry, a civic group that sponsored the exam.
NEWS
March 28, 2014
The Sun recently published extensive, highly negative but unchallenged remarks about Israel made by Richard Falk, who is identified in the story as an unbiased UN human rights investigator monitoring Israel's treatment of Palestinians ("U.N. investigator accuses Israel of 'ethnic cleansing,'" March 22). Yet nowhere are Mr. Falk's deep-seated anti-Israel and anti-Western biases noted in the more than 750-word article. Among its many omissions, the article failed to mention that Mr. Falk was chastised by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon for saying the U.S. has covered up its own involvement in the 9/11 attack and that the Boston Marathon bombing was understandable "blowback" for American policies in the Muslim world.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2000
Federal civil rights lawyers are investigating conditions at the Baltimore City Detention Center, citing allegations that the nearly 150-year-old jail is violating the rights of inmates and subjecting prisoners to a "life-threatening" environment. In an Oct. 16 letter, Bill Lann Lee, head of the U.S. Department of Justice civil rights division, informed Gov. Parris N. Glendening of the probe, state officials said. Lee cited concerns that inmates lacked adequate medical and mental health care, were housed in dangerous conditions and that juveniles were "subjected to excessive use of isolation."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 26, 2005
For the first time, Human Rights Watch has issued a report that harshly criticizes a single industry in the United States, concluding that working conditions among the nation's meatpackers and slaughterhouses are so bad that they violate basic human rights. The report, released yesterday, echoes Upton Sinclair's classic on the industry, The Jungle. It finds that jobs in many beef, pork and poultry plants are so dangerous as to breach international agreements promising a safe workplace.
NEWS
December 5, 2004
A PROMINENT JAMAICAN gay rights activist is brutally murdered one June morning, and a crowd gathers to rejoice and sing "Boom Bye Bye," a popular reggae song about killing gay men. Nine days later, another gay man is "chopped, stabbed and stoned to death" by an angry mob egged on by police officers who, according to a witness, told them to "beat him because him a battyman," local slang for homosexual. Days later, six men are driven from their home and beaten by a group of angry men. When they report the crime to police, officers nearly laugh them out of the station.
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