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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | February 25, 1993
An aide to County Executive Charles I. Ecker asked "insensitive and inappropriate questions" as part of an interview recently and should not be allowed to conduct any more of them, the Human Rights Commission says.The commission has sent Mr. Ecker two letters asking that administrative assistant Gail Bates be removed from the process of screening and selecting nominees for county boards and commissions.Both letters score Ms. Bates for her "apparent incorrect and insensitive interview techniques," but neither letter says what the offending techniques are. Commission Chairwoman Jan Nyquist, who wrote both letters, could not be reached for comment yesterday.
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October 13, 2011
Listings are accepted on a space-available basis. Deadline is 5 p.m. Thursday prior to date of publication at the latest. To submit contest items, mail to Contests, Patuxent Publishing Co. Editorial, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278; email hccalendar@patuxent.com ; fax 410-332-6336; or call 410-332-6497. Rising Star Award Competition Call for Applicants - Hosted by the Howard County Arts Council. Open to individual performers, ages 18-35, who live, train, work, or perform regularly in Howard County or have done so in the past.
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NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1997
The Court of Special Appeals yesterday dismissed an appeal by a Columbia health care firm that had been ordered to pay $26,500 to a woman who claimed the firm discriminated against her because of her pregnancy.The court ruled that it did not have jurisdiction to decide the matter because the issue did not originate in a lower court, but rather in a county administrative agency, the Human Rights Commission.In June 1995, the commission ordered HealthCare Strategies Inc., a managed-care provider, to pay $26,500 in back pay to medical transcriptionist Judith Carter of Randallstown.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV | June 29, 2008
It was a busy week for Adejire Bademosi. This month, she was nominated to be the student member of the Howard County Human Rights Commission. And Thursday, she was sworn in as student member of the Howard County Board of Education. Not bad for a rising junior at Marriotts Ridge High School. "I've always had an interest in both," Bademosi said. "I've always been for education and human rights." C. Vernon Gray, administrator of the Howard County Office of Human Rights and executive secretary of the Human Rights Commission, said he is impressed with Bademosi.
NEWS
March 27, 2002
County seeks student to serve on Human Rights Commission Howard County Executive James N. Robey has announced an opening for a student, younger than 18, to serve on the Howard County Human Rights Commission. The commission is charged with recommending a general civil rights policy in the county, advising residents on patterns of discrimination and making recommendations on civil rights based on its investigations. The student position on the 23-member commission is nonvoting, and extends from July 1 to June 30, 2003.
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Mexico City Bureau of The Sun | April 18, 1991
MEXICO CITY -- The National Human Rights Commission has announced that its telephones and offices were bugged at a time when its chairman was in Washington touting Mexico's human rights record.Yesterday, independent human rights groups here and in the United States assailed the bugging as an attempt by the government to "chill" the testimony of witnesses whose views might put the Salinas administration in a bad light.The human rights commission, in its press announcement late Tuesday, stopped short of accusing the government of involvement in the bugging, although there have been several such cases in the past.
NEWS
January 18, 1993
With the appointment of a new human relations director for Howard County public schools and the naming of a Wilde Lake High School senior to the county's Human Rights Commission, the local government and school system have recently taken encouraging steps to address the nasty problem of hate and bias incidents at area schools.The incidents have been well-documented over the past year: A Klansman handing out literature at a county elementary school. A black girl sprayed with disinfectant by a white boy on a school bus. Swastikas painted on school buildings.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | June 17, 1992
A financial disclosure bill before the County Council was designed to make mischief for the Human Rights Commission, the commission chairman said Monday.Roger W. Jones suggested that the commission has become too zealous for some people's tastes, and that critics might like to tame it by limiting the number of applicants for membership. One way to do that, he said, would be to require nominees to fill out the county's nine-page financial disclosure statement."This commission has been more out front than any other [on human rights issues]
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | March 22, 1991
The chairman of Howard County's Human Rights Commission says a proposal to cut his budget by 69 percent next year would undermine the commission's work at a time when the number of discrimination complaints is surging.Roger W. Jones, the chairman, said the proposed cut shows a "complete disregard" for the commission's goals "at the very moment that racial, religious and ethnic incidents within Howard County have increased an astonishing 60 percent."Manus J. O'Donnell, director of the Department of Citizen Services that oversees the commission, has recommended the cut as part of his plan to meet the county executive's demand that all departments reduce spending by 16 percent.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | June 24, 1992
A bill that would require members of the Human Rights Commission and four other appointed boards to disclose their finances before appointment came under heavy attack Monday.The bill, sponsored by the county Ethics Commission, would require nominees to the Human Rights Commission, the Animal Matters Hearing Board, the Board of Electrical Examiners, the Board of Health and the Personnel Board to join members of 11 other boards and commissions in filling out the county's nine-page financial disclosure statement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 1, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- Officials of the United Nations have decided that they must act within weeks to produce an alternative to its widely discredited Human Rights Commission to maintain hope of redeeming the United Nations' credibility this year. The commission, which is based in Geneva, has been a persistent embarrassment to the United Nations because participation has been open to countries such as Cuba, Sudan and Zimbabwe, current members who are themselves accused of gross rights abuses.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 21, 2003
KABUL, Afghanistan - Outrage over reports of a plan to build high-end residences in central Kabul for government officials is threatening to discredit the 20-month-old administration of President Hamid Karzai. The accusations come as Karzai enters the last year of his term and prepares for another foreign tour to raise money to rebuild the country. His government has been losing support because of perceived injustices and slowness in its reconstruction efforts. To build the new housing - which would be for Afghan Cabinet ministers, government officials and mujahedeen commanders - a crew of 100 armed police officers with bulldozers started demolishing the modest mud-walled houses of about 30 families two weeks ago. The crew broke down walls of 12 houses, injuring at least two children who were inside, residents said.
NEWS
March 26, 2003
Student member sought for Human Rights Commission Howard County Executive James N. Robey is seeking a high school student to serve on the Howard County Human Rights Commission as a nonvoting student commissioner. The commission was established to recommend general human rights policy in the county, investigate human rights complaints and make recommendations and advise residents on patterns of discrimination. The student commissioners must attend monthly meetings. Applications, which are available from the Office of Human Rights or by calling 410-313-6430, are due by 4 p.m. Friday.
NEWS
By Paul Watson and Paul Watson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 2002
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - President Pervez Musharraf claimed a powerful mandate from Pakistani voters yesterday while an independent human rights commission and opposition parties charged that a referendum on extending the army general's rule was marred by extensive fraud. Nearly 98 percent of the ballots cast in Tuesday's referendum supported Musharraf's bid for five more years, said the country's chief election commissioner, Irshad Hassan Khan. But opposition parties, the human rights commission and newspapers reported that ballot-box stuffing and other abuses were widespread.
NEWS
March 27, 2002
County seeks student to serve on Human Rights Commission Howard County Executive James N. Robey has announced an opening for a student, younger than 18, to serve on the Howard County Human Rights Commission. The commission is charged with recommending a general civil rights policy in the county, advising residents on patterns of discrimination and making recommendations on civil rights based on its investigations. The student position on the 23-member commission is nonvoting, and extends from July 1 to June 30, 2003.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | May 30, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Ever since the United States got voted off the island at the U.N. Human Rights Commission three weeks ago, Congress has been hopping mad and the U.N.-haters have been on a tear. So I have an idea: Let's quit the United Nations. Most of its members don't speak English anyway. What an insult! Let's just shut it down and turn it into another Trump Tower. That Security Council table would make a perfect sushi bar. No? You don't want to leave the United Nations to the Europeans and Russians?
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 13, 1998
SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, Mexico -- Federal prosecutors have accused a state police commander of helping to arm a gang of paramilitary gunmen who murdered 45 Indian villagers in December. They are the first criminal charges filed against police and state government officials who have been under investigation for the massacre.The prosecutors also indicated that their investigation is closing in on higher state officials who may have provided direct support to the killers. They said that the police commander, Felipe Vazquez Espinosa, testified that "superior officers" ordered him to turn a blind eye to paramilitary groups flaunting illegal weapons in his precinct as long as they supported Mexico's ruling political party, the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI.At the same time, the National Human Rights Commission, a federal government agency, has described in a report how senior state officials and police commanders protected the killers, mangled the crime scene without conducting an investigation, loaded the bodies "like merchandise" into a cargo truck and rushed them away from the village in pre-dawn darkness.
NEWS
By John M. McClintock and John M. McClintock,Mexico City Bureau of The Sun | September 28, 1991
MEXICO CITY -- A top federal police commander was charged yesterday in the 1990 slaying of a human rights leader that aroused international outrage.Mario Alberto Gonzalez Trevino, who is charged with murder was accused of ordering the killing of Norma Corona Sapien as head of the Federal Judicial Police, which is similar to the FBI, in the western state of Sinaloa.Ms. Corona, who was head of the Sinaloa human right commission, apparently had evidence implicating the Federal Judicial Police in the kidnapping and killing of three Venezuelans and their Mexican lawyer.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - President Bush called the United States' ouster from the United Nations Human Rights Commission "outrageous" yesterday, but said Washington should continue to pay its dues to the organization. Bush told reporters at a news conference that he raised the topic of the commission earlier in the day in a meeting with U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan at the White House. "I told him it was hard for me to envision a Human Rights Commission without the United States. ... " Bush said.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | May 11, 2001
WASHINGTON - Furious at the ouster of the United States from the United Nations' Human Rights Commission, the House voted yesterday to freeze payment of $244 million in back U.N. dues until the nation is given back its seat. "We needed and wanted to give our members the opportunity to express their dismay and disgust" with the commission's action, said Rep. Henry J. Hyde, a Republican from Illinois and cosponsor of the measure. "This, we felt, was one of the effective, non-catastrophic ways of making that sentiment."
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