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By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin met with members of the protest group Pussy Riot on Tuesday to bring attention to human rights abuses in Russia as well as his efforts to expand economic sanctions against top officials in the country. The Maryland Democrat, a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and the U.S. Helsinki Commission on human rights said that Nadya Tolokonnikova and Maria Alyokhina put a face on abuses that he said have taken place under the government of Vladimir Putin "Unless you can put a face on it, it's difficult to get attention or action," Cardin said.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2014
U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin met with members of the protest group Pussy Riot on Tuesday to bring attention to human rights abuses in Russia as well as his efforts to expand economic sanctions against top officials in the country. The Maryland Democrat, a member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and the U.S. Helsinki Commission on human rights said that Nadya Tolokonnikova and Maria Alyokhina put a face on abuses that he said have taken place under the government of Vladimir Putin "Unless you can put a face on it, it's difficult to get attention or action," Cardin said.
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NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | May 21, 1993
London. -- The World Conference on Human Rights will be held in Vienna in mid-June. It is supposed to do for political freedom what last year's Rio conference did for the global environment -- make it the talking point everywhere.Alas, the news brings yawns in the newsrooms, yawns in the chanceries of most democratic governments. A year ago the media flocked to Rio and buzzed on all things environmental. This year one wouldn't know that anything was happening in Vienna, other than the giant Ferris wheel going round and round.
NEWS
December 18, 2012
Neil Simon's column on the new U.S.-Russia trade law could not be further from the truth when it states that Sen. Benjamin Cardin has "catapulted human rights atop the international agenda ("Cardin stands up for rights," Dec. 12). Senator Cardin talks about freedom and democracy for everyone except the Palestinians, who have been suffering under a brutal Israeli occupation for 45 years. They have been victims of land and water theft, home demolitions, targeted assassinations, mass arrests, torture and a blockade of Gaza that is strangling the civilian population.
NEWS
October 25, 2010
Over the weekend, Julian Assange, the reclusive renegade computer hacker who has made a career of unveiling government and corporate secrets on the whistle-blower website Wikileaks, confounded American policymakers for the second time in three months when he released nearly 400,000 classified field reports from the war in Iraq. In July, Wikileaks posted 90,000 classified documents describing a litany of strategic setbacks, human rights abuses and widespread corruption in the government of Afghan President Hamid Karzai.
NEWS
By RUTH ROSEN | April 12, 1991
Davis, California -- Are genital mutilation, forced prostitution, marital rape, murder of raped daughters, deaths resulting from dowry disputes merely customs, or do they constitute violations of human rights? Spurred by the spread of global feminism, some activists are seeking to redefine the hidden injuries of sex as violations of women's human rights.Before the women's movement, many such cruelties were not defined as crimes. During the last two decades, however, feminists in the United States and elsewhere named the sexual crimes women had once suffered in silence.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | June 30, 1995
London -- "One of the fundamental purposes of the United Nations is to defend freedom of expression. Today that right is being violated by the U.N. itself. The same institution that framed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is now accused of suppressing information about human-rights abuses and has become a censor in its own right.''This is the opening paragraph of an expose of the U.N. published earlier this week by Article 19, the London-based International Centre Against Censorship, and written by Richard Reoch, who for 20 years was director of information at Amnesty International.
NEWS
December 18, 2012
Neil Simon's column on the new U.S.-Russia trade law could not be further from the truth when it states that Sen. Benjamin Cardin has "catapulted human rights atop the international agenda ("Cardin stands up for rights," Dec. 12). Senator Cardin talks about freedom and democracy for everyone except the Palestinians, who have been suffering under a brutal Israeli occupation for 45 years. They have been victims of land and water theft, home demolitions, targeted assassinations, mass arrests, torture and a blockade of Gaza that is strangling the civilian population.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 21, 1995
TEGUCIGALPA -- The attorney for three military officers sought in connection with human rights abuses during the 1980s asked the Honduran Court of Appeals yesterday to void arrest warrants issued against his clients.The fugitives are believed to be former members of a CIA-trained military unit called Battalion 316. The battalion stalked, kidnapped, tortured and murdered hundreds of suspected leftists during the 1980s as the Reagan administration sought to wipe out communism in Central America.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | September 4, 1991
BEIJING -- British Prime Minister John Major, the first Wester leader to visit here since the Tiananmen Square massacre two years ago, lectured Chinese Premier Li Peng at length yesterday on the world's concerns about human rights abuses in China.At one point, Mr. Major cited a letter that he received from an opposition member of the British Parliament in order to illustrate "the strength of concerns about human rights that exist across all strands of opinion in my country," he said later.
NEWS
By Kim Jensen | May 2, 2011
I just returned from a 10-day human rights delegation to Colombia sponsored by Witness for Peace. While we were in the midst of our intensive meetings in Valle del Cauca, Northern Cauca, and Bogota, we discovered that a high profile-American delegation had just arrived in the capital for its own two-day tour. The U.S. Congressional Ways and Means Committee had sent a bipartisan fact-finding mission to Colombia, co-sponsored by Maryland Rep. Steny Hoyer. What an amazing coincidence: two American delegations were gathering facts about Colombia at the same time.
NEWS
October 25, 2010
Over the weekend, Julian Assange, the reclusive renegade computer hacker who has made a career of unveiling government and corporate secrets on the whistle-blower website Wikileaks, confounded American policymakers for the second time in three months when he released nearly 400,000 classified field reports from the war in Iraq. In July, Wikileaks posted 90,000 classified documents describing a litany of strategic setbacks, human rights abuses and widespread corruption in the government of Afghan President Hamid Karzai.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally | March 31, 2004
Even as the United States recruited Uzbekistan as an ally in its war against terrorism, it has criticized the Central Asian nation for human rights abuses - including the harassment of Muslim dissidents. Uzbekistan, a traditionally Muslim former republic of the Soviet Union, lies in a region important to the West. It touches Afghanistan, a part of the world where the United States has an interest in making Muslim friends rather than enemies. Now, with Uzbekistan in the news after three days of bombings and police skirmishes that have left at least 42 dead, the New York-based Human Rights Watch has issued a report contradicting the Uzbek government's assertions that Muslim dissidents' arrests have been necessary to prevent terrorism.
TOPIC
By Frida Berrigan and Frida Berrigan,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | April 7, 2002
In a speech marking the six-month anniversary of Sept. 11, President Bush envisioned a "peaceful world beyond terror" where "disputes can be settled within the bounds of reason and good will and mutual security." But Bush's coalition against terrorism is deepening U.S. military ties with countries that don't settle their disputes "within the bounds of reason and good will." In fact, many of these countries commit human-rights abuses that are well documented by the State Department. Last month, the department released its annual "Country Reports on Human Rights Practices."
NEWS
March 5, 2001
THE MORE freedom China grants its people as consumers and economic creators, the more it fears what they may be thinking, saying or praying. It wants them to have access to the Internet, but to control what they find there. It wants them to create the new economy, not a new politics. It recognizes religion, which it wants them to reject. People need no longer chant the cliches of Communist propaganda, as long as they don't chant anything else. All this is behind the Chinese government's brusque collision with the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, Mary Robinson, after she criticized China's suppression of Tibetan Buddhists, Christians and members of the Falun Gong exercise-meditation movement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 3, 1999
SANTIAGO, Chile -- The arrest of Gen. Augusto Pinochet in London a year ago has opened a quiet and long-postponed reckoning in Chile over its years of dictatorship that is finally bringing former military officers to task for the deaths or disappearances of thousands of political opponents. Since the arrest of Pinochet, the former dictator, 25 officers have been arrested on charges of murder, torture and kidnapping, including a member of one of the juntas that helped rule the country for 17 years after 1973.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | January 28, 1994
For years, civil rights attorney Jennifer Kristina Harbury has helped Guatemalans in danger. Today, she is frustrated that she can't help her husband who she says is imprisoned in a Guatemalan prison."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 3, 1999
SANTIAGO, Chile -- The arrest of Gen. Augusto Pinochet in London a year ago has opened a quiet and long-postponed reckoning in Chile over its years of dictatorship that is finally bringing former military officers to task for the deaths or disappearances of thousands of political opponents. Since the arrest of Pinochet, the former dictator, 25 officers have been arrested on charges of murder, torture and kidnapping, including a member of one of the juntas that helped rule the country for 17 years after 1973.
TOPIC
By RICK ROCKWELL | June 6, 1999
WHEN Mexico's President Ernesto Zedillo acknowledged recently the extent of poverty in his proud nation, it seemed like a first step toward solving a problem many Americans also want addressed.For Americans, the mention of Mexico conjures one stereotypical image: a flood of desperate, unemployed people illegally crossing our border. The reasoning on this side of the border seems to be that if Mexico's economy gets better, Mexicans will have less need to come here.Of course, that reasoning looks at immigration as if it were simply caused by a lack of jobs in Mexico.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 21, 1995
TEGUCIGALPA -- The attorney for three military officers sought in connection with human rights abuses during the 1980s asked the Honduran Court of Appeals yesterday to void arrest warrants issued against his clients.The fugitives are believed to be former members of a CIA-trained military unit called Battalion 316. The battalion stalked, kidnapped, tortured and murdered hundreds of suspected leftists during the 1980s as the Reagan administration sought to wipe out communism in Central America.
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