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Human Remains

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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | July 28, 1995
At first glance, "Love and Human Remains" has the elements of a simple, funny relationship drama -- young adults searching for love and coping with angst in the big city.Guess again."Love and Human Remains" is a web of dark stories, none of them simple. There's the search for love, but there are also the searches for identity, sex and direction -- all playing against an unlikely serial-killer thriller. Somehow, it works, showing us how tenuous and rare love is and how perilous even the most mundane of our lives can be.Brad Fraser wrote the screenplay, based on his play "Unidentified Human Remains and the True Nature of Love" (probably a more accurate title, but tough to fit on a movie marquee)
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Elizabeth E.W. Kirk has planned to be buried alongside her mother, Beatrice, and her family dogs at the Rosa Bonheur Memorial Park in Elkridge, believed to be one of the world's first pet cemeteries to allow people to be laid to rest with their animal companions. Her name is already set into the grassy turf there, on a bronze plaque with a photograph of her as a young woman snuggled in bed with five dogs. But now the 69-year-old worries that her final resting place may have to be someplace else.
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NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1996
To cash in on the growing popularity of cremation, a new company wants to build Howard County's first crematorium for human remains, an Elkridge facility that would incinerate up to three bodies a day.Capitol Crematorium, a partnership between two Columbia men, will face its first test at a Planning Board hearing this morning. The Department of Planning & Zoning has recommended allowing the crematorium in a light manufacturing zone on South Hanover Road -- about 500 feet from the residential area of Loudon Avenue.
NEWS
February 22, 2010
Authorities say skeletal human remains have been found on the grounds of a bed and breakfast in downtown Snow Hill. The remains were found after several hours of a search connected with a larger investigation. The remains are believed to be a woman's, and the person is being referred to as "Jane Doe." The remains were sent to the state Medical Examiner's office in Baltimore for identification. Worcester County State's Attorney Joel Todd says it would be inappropriate to immediately provide more details of the investigation.
NEWS
By Bryan Virasami and Bryan Virasami,NEWSDAY | October 25, 2006
NEW YORK -- In defending claims that the post-Sept. 11 search for human remains at the World Trade Center site were halted prematurely in 2002, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said yesterday that the cleanup was rushed because family members were eager to recover remains of loved ones. "The families really wanted to get any remains back as quickly as possible. If you think about a family member, they don't know whether their loved one will be found, and we try to work as expeditiously as possible," Bloomberg said.
NEWS
October 8, 2007
Baltimore : Traffic Roadwork to affect parking in Southeast There will be no parking on either side of Eastern Avenue between Ponca and South Macon streets in Southeast Baltimore from today to Dec. 17, the city Transportation Department has announced. Crews will be working on conduit installation and road repairs. The road will remain open to traffic during the work period, but drivers should expect delays. Carroll County : Westminster Plane in no-fly zone is forced to land State police say a small plane was forced to land in Carroll County yesterday after it entered into a no-fly zone.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | May 4, 1993
The Howard County Council last night enacted a tough cemetery preservation law that will require developers to preserve burial grounds as open space."This shows we care about cemeteries and the history therein," said Councilman C. Vernon Gray, D-3rd, sponsor of the bill, which takes effect in 30 days. "What is particularly important is that it offers a process for dealing with human remains discovered during excavation or grading."The lack of such a policy led residents of Turf Valley Overlook in Ellicott City to wage a three-year battle to preserve old St. Mary's Cemetery in the heart of their neighborhood.
NEWS
July 22, 1992
Residents of Turf Valley Overlook in Howard County are delighted that a construction crew building two homes at the site of a nearby cemetery unearthed human remains this week. Now they can say, "I told you so," and insist with renewed vigor that the project be halted.But the battle over St. Mary's Cemetery has never been over which side was right about the possibility that human remains would be uncovered. The county and state's attorneys office, which allowed the project to go forward, both dispatched archaeologists to the site assuming that such a possibility existed.
FEATURES
By Randi Henderson | June 28, 1991
REMEMBER WHEN people died, were buried -- and rested in peace?If recent events signify any sort of trend, resting in peace may be a dubious proposition for the hereafter, especially if you were famous, or killed someone famous, or did something else that might leave people wondering years later about the circumstances of your life or death.But just because President Zachary Taylor was exhumed June 17 to look for signs of arsenic poisoning (none were found) and Huey Long's assassin will be dug up in October seeking clues to that murder, not everyone agrees that exhumation is an idea whose time has come.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- In a sort of dress rehearsal for the excavation later this year of three lead coffins believed to hold the remains of Maryland's founding Calvert family, scientists have entered another 17th-century churchyard crypt to study the coffins of Maryland's first royal governor and his wife.Experts entered the massive brick burial vault of Sir Lionel Copley and his wife, Anne, in the Trinity Episcopal churchyard April 30. The Copleys died in St. Mary's City in 1694. At a news conference here yesterday, scientists said the daylong entry into the Copley vault, done with permission of church officials, provided them with important data on the construction of lead coffins in the 17th century.
NEWS
October 19, 2008
Human remains found in basement of rowhouse Human remains were discovered yesterday afternoon in the basement of an East Baltimore rowhouse that is undergoing renovation, authorities said. Police spokesman Donny Moses said that investigators were calling the discovery a "suspicious death." He said that the body was so decomposed that a fingerprint identification was not possible. "The bones have been there a long time," Moses said. Howard Wyman, 63, said that he and other workers were cleaning out the vacant rowhouse in the 1900 block of E. Lanvale St. for two days and had just moved on to the basement.
NEWS
October 8, 2007
Baltimore : Traffic Roadwork to affect parking in Southeast There will be no parking on either side of Eastern Avenue between Ponca and South Macon streets in Southeast Baltimore from today to Dec. 17, the city Transportation Department has announced. Crews will be working on conduit installation and road repairs. The road will remain open to traffic during the work period, but drivers should expect delays. Carroll County : Westminster Plane in no-fly zone is forced to land State police say a small plane was forced to land in Carroll County yesterday after it entered into a no-fly zone.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | August 31, 2007
A three decade-old missing person case prompted Wednesday's daylong search by police and the FBI outside a Pasadena home, though no human remains have been positively identified, a source with knowledge of the investigation said yesterday. Police were searching for the body of Karen Kamsch, a teenage girl who lived at the home on Wishing Rock Road with her grandmother and disappeared in the mid-1970s. According to a neighbor, she was presumed to be a runaway at the time. Despite news media reports that a body or human remains had been located in a well on the property, authorities did not find anything conclusive, according to the source.
NEWS
By Herbert Lowe and Herbert Lowe,NEWSDAY | October 28, 2006
NEW YORK -- A renewed search for human remains at Ground Zero will be expanded to a service road there, several area streets and the rooftops of two nearby buildings, Mayor Michael R Bloomberg announced yesterday. Two city and state agencies looking into the recovery of remains at the World Trade Center site expressed particular concern about a 60-foot-wide service road running the length of the site from Liberty Street to Vesey Street. That road, just inside the trade center's western edge, was rebuilt in March 2002 as part of the post-Sept.
NEWS
By Bryan Virasami and Bryan Virasami,NEWSDAY | October 25, 2006
NEW YORK -- In defending claims that the post-Sept. 11 search for human remains at the World Trade Center site were halted prematurely in 2002, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg said yesterday that the cleanup was rushed because family members were eager to recover remains of loved ones. "The families really wanted to get any remains back as quickly as possible. If you think about a family member, they don't know whether their loved one will be found, and we try to work as expeditiously as possible," Bloomberg said.
NEWS
By Zachary R. Dowdy and Zachary R. Dowdy,Newsday | October 21, 2006
NEW YORK -- Outraged relatives of victims of the Sept. 11 attacks - saying the revelation that more remains of victims have been found sparks the fresh pain of a reopened wound - demanded again yesterday that New York City launch a comprehensive search and give their loved ones a proper burial. City leaders, meanwhile, huddled in a closed-door meeting where they vowed to conduct a new search of underground sites similar to the manhole where Consolidated Edison workers stumbled upon the remains two days ago. The relatives also called for state and federal investigations into the failure to collect remains from Ground Zero, saying the fact that more were found five years after the terrorist attacks - and for the second time in the past year - is unacceptable and suggests the city does not take the task seriously.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | October 24, 1992
ST. MARY'S CITY -- Crouched at the bottom of a 17th-century grave, hopeful scientists yesterday extracted more than 2 liters of air from a sealed lead coffin.But they'll need the best 20th century equipment to show if the air is free of modern pollutants -- and the key to a breakthrough in atmospheric science.Initial analyses by NASA researchers failed to confirm whether the coffin air has, in fact, been sealed off since the 1600s. The samples, in steel cylinders, were sent to a better-equipped lab in Virginia for further analysis over the weekend.
NEWS
By New York Daily News | September 11, 1994
ALIQUIPPA, Pa. -- Hundreds of small red flags dotted the charred hillside yesterday where USAir Flight 427 met its doom -- haunting memorials to the 132 people who died there.The hillside has been divided into a grid, with orange lines spray-painted on the ground at 15-foot intervals, said Russ Glenz, a Beaver County emergency worker. He is one of a team of 20 assigned to search for human remains from Thursday night's crash. Other teams have been assigned to locate airplane parts.The job of recovering human remains was about 60 percent complete yesterday and was expected to be finished tomorrow, said Fire Marshall John Kaus.
NEWS
August 4, 2005
BALTIMORE Objections, outbursts punctuate murder trial Lengthy cross-examination yesterday in the trial of two Mexican immigrants accused of killing their three young relatives drew several outbursts from a police witness and more than 150 objections from a prosecutor. Salvatore Bianca, a forensic scientist who is testifying about what could become key evidence in the murder trial, was on the witness stand all day yesterday and all day Tuesday. A former Baltimore Police Department crime lab employee, Bianca invented a vacuum device that collects skin cells and other trace evidence.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
In Annapolis, a town that wears three centuries of history proudly, a simple sidewalk project can quickly turn into a public archaeology lesson. Witness the work taking place outside St. Anne's Episcopal Church in the heart of the state capital's historic district, a stone's throw from the governor's mansion. A team of archaeologists recently stood by this month as city workers installed new granite curbs and prepared to put in new bricks near the church cemetery, keeping watch for more bones like those uncovered in January -- a find that shut down work for a few months.
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