Advertisement
HomeCollectionsHuman Papillomavirus
IN THE NEWS

Human Papillomavirus

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1999
Digene Corp. a Beltsville-based developer of DNA-based medical tests for diseases, said yesterday that drug giant Abbott Laboratories will act as the marketer and distributor for its tests in Europe, the Middle East and Africa.Among the tests Abbott will market are Digene's diagnostic products for hepatitis B and the human papillomavirus (HPV), considered a precursor to cervical cancer.In the United States, Abbott, one of the world's largest marketers of medical diagnostics, will launch sales of Digene's new automated tests for chlamydia, a urinary tract infection, and gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted disease.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 13, 2008
In a first-ever analysis, 25 percent of all teenage girls in the U.S. and nearly half of African-American girls ages 14 to 19 were found to have a sexually transmitted disease. Those alarming rates suggest that admonitions to teenagers about safe sex are falling on deaf ears and that when it comes to infectious diseases, a lot more effort must be put into education, screening and prevention. Some experts familiar with high levels of sexual activity among teenagers as well as young women's greater vulnerability to STDs weren't surprised by the results.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | August 16, 2007
As the first day of school approaches, parents are checking to make sure their children are up to date on their vaccines. By the time Maryland children enter kindergarten, they are required to have been vaccinated against 11 diseases -- diphtheria, pertussis, Hib (haemophilus influenza), pneumococcus, tetanus, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis and chicken pox. And, this year, both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics are recommending that children receive four new vaccines: a booster for chicken pox, rotavirus, hepatitis A and the human papillomavirus, says Julie Yeh, assistant chair of pediatrics at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | August 16, 2007
As the first day of school approaches, parents are checking to make sure their children are up to date on their vaccines. By the time Maryland children enter kindergarten, they are required to have been vaccinated against 11 diseases -- diphtheria, pertussis, Hib (haemophilus influenza), pneumococcus, tetanus, polio, measles, mumps, rubella, hepatitis and chicken pox. And, this year, both the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics are recommending that children receive four new vaccines: a booster for chicken pox, rotavirus, hepatitis A and the human papillomavirus, says Julie Yeh, assistant chair of pediatrics at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1998
Digene Corp. of Beltsville has acquired Viropath BV, a Dutch company that has been developing tests and other products for cervical cancer. The purchase was accomplished through a stock swap worth an estimated $1.5 million.Under the terms of the stock purchase agreement, Digene purchased all of the outstanding capital stock of Viropath in exchange for 181,884 shares of newly issued Digene common stock.The deal closed in July but was not disclosed until yesterday, said Charles M. Fleischman, chief financial officer for Digene.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2003
After 13 years of losses, Digene Corp. said yesterday that it is poised to turn a profit, though a small one, for the first time next quarter, an important milestone for investors in the Gaithersburg-based medical diagnostics company. The profit was forecast as the company reported that its third-quarter loss narrowed to $600,000, or 3 cents a share, compared with a loss of $3.3 million, or 19 cents a share, in the third quarter of last year. The company's fiscal year ends June 30. In a conference call, Digene executives told analysts that they expect fourth-quarter results to fall between break-even and a profit of $600,000, setting the stage for a fiscal 2004 profit of "at least" $6.5 million, or about 35 cents a share.
BUSINESS
By Mara H. Gottfried and Mara H. Gottfried,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 15, 2000
Gaithersburg-based Digene Corp. said yesterday that it has come to an agreement with Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings to use its HPV test, which helps detect cervical cancer in women. Vandana K. Bapna, a biotechnology analyst at Hunt Valley-based Offutt Securities, called the deal significant for Digene, a biotechnology company that focuses on DNA and RNA technology for the detection, screening and monitoring of sexually transmitted diseases. "LabCorp is one of the largest reference testing labs in the United States," Bapna said.
NEWS
March 13, 2008
In a first-ever analysis, 25 percent of all teenage girls in the U.S. and nearly half of African-American girls ages 14 to 19 were found to have a sexually transmitted disease. Those alarming rates suggest that admonitions to teenagers about safe sex are falling on deaf ears and that when it comes to infectious diseases, a lot more effort must be put into education, screening and prevention. Some experts familiar with high levels of sexual activity among teenagers as well as young women's greater vulnerability to STDs weren't surprised by the results.
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2002
Digene Corp. said yesterday that it paid Abbott Laboratories $2.5 million in stock to reacquire the rights to diagnostic tests for two sexually transmitted diseases. The Gaithersburg company said that getting back the rights to its chlamydia and gonorrhea tests eventually will allow it to "bundle" them with its HPV test for cervical cancer. The move ultimately may increase both revenue for the company and convenience for women, allowing all three tests to be run from one patient sample.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | October 7, 2005
In what is hailed as a public health breakthrough, a pharmaceutical company reported yesterday that an injected vaccine can prevent the vast majority of cervical cancer cases. The vaccine, which Merck & Co. will soon submit to the Food and Drug Administration for approval, works by arming the immune system against sexually transmitted viruses that trigger the cancer. Known as Gardasil, it would be only the second vaccine to prevent cancer. The other guards against hepatitis B infections, a leading cause of liver cancer in Asia but not the United States.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,Los Angeles Times | March 23, 2007
With human papillomavirus, girls and women have been getting all the attention. Parents across the United States have rushed to have their daughters vaccinated against the virus. States are wrestling with whether to require adolescents be vaccinated. And recent research found that HPV infection rates among girls and women are higher than previously thought - more than one-quarter of females ages 14 to 59. Now the attention is turning to boys and men. As many as 60 percent of men ages 18 to 70 are infected with HPV, according to data not yet published, raising the question of whether the new vaccine will be effective unless men, not just women, are immunized.
NEWS
March 20, 2007
Long-term impact of vaccine unknown I think Susan Reimer should give parents who question the use of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to prevent cervical cancer more credit ("Give daughters a shot at avoiding cervical cancer," March 13). Ms. Reimer assumes that the real reason parents would object to having their daughters receive the HPV vaccine is that they think it would encourage sexual promiscuity. I disagree with her assumption. I have three daughters (ages 20, 22 and 24)
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | January 21, 2007
With a new vaccine on the market to prevent it and multimillion-dollar advertising campaigns highlighting it, the cervical-cancer-causing human papillomavirus - or HPV - might be the most talked-about sexually transmitted disease since HIV. Yet a seven-year-old test designed to detect its most dangerous strains in women still isn't used in 4 out of the 5 gynecological exams it's approved for, according to Digene Corp., the Gaithersburg company that makes the test. And the recent attention to the virus has led other women to request the test when it isn't right for them.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | July 24, 2006
BOSTON -- So once more we reach into the right-wing toolbox, a political chest so spare that it holds almost nothing but a wide assortment of wedges. Who would have believed that the wedges used so successfully to divide America would end up dividing conservatives? That they would finally expose the differences between the right and the, um, loony right? The latest of these wedge issues is stem cell research. But it's not the only one. Gradually, over the past year, we've begun to see daylight emerge between common sense and nonsense.
NEWS
By JONATHAN BOR and JONATHAN BOR,SUN REPORTER | October 7, 2005
In what is hailed as a public health breakthrough, a pharmaceutical company reported yesterday that an injected vaccine can prevent the vast majority of cervical cancer cases. The vaccine, which Merck & Co. will soon submit to the Food and Drug Administration for approval, works by arming the immune system against sexually transmitted viruses that trigger the cancer. Known as Gardasil, it would be only the second vaccine to prevent cancer. The other guards against hepatitis B infections, a leading cause of liver cancer in Asia but not the United States.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2003
After 13 years of losses, Digene Corp. said yesterday that it is poised to turn a profit, though a small one, for the first time next quarter, an important milestone for investors in the Gaithersburg-based medical diagnostics company. The profit was forecast as the company reported that its third-quarter loss narrowed to $600,000, or 3 cents a share, compared with a loss of $3.3 million, or 19 cents a share, in the third quarter of last year. The company's fiscal year ends June 30. In a conference call, Digene executives told analysts that they expect fourth-quarter results to fall between break-even and a profit of $600,000, setting the stage for a fiscal 2004 profit of "at least" $6.5 million, or about 35 cents a share.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,Los Angeles Times | March 23, 2007
With human papillomavirus, girls and women have been getting all the attention. Parents across the United States have rushed to have their daughters vaccinated against the virus. States are wrestling with whether to require adolescents be vaccinated. And recent research found that HPV infection rates among girls and women are higher than previously thought - more than one-quarter of females ages 14 to 59. Now the attention is turning to boys and men. As many as 60 percent of men ages 18 to 70 are infected with HPV, according to data not yet published, raising the question of whether the new vaccine will be effective unless men, not just women, are immunized.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
At health clinics operated by Omnia Inc. in Chicago and the Northeast, women are routinely tested for cervical cancer using that stalwart of gynecology, the Pap smear, and a new, more sensitive test that many medical experts believe could one day replace it.Philadelphia-based Omnia, which manages private gynecology practices serving 400,000 women, is the first managed care organization in the United States to use the new test in conjunction with the Pap....
BUSINESS
By Julie Bell and Julie Bell,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2002
Digene Corp. said yesterday that it paid Abbott Laboratories $2.5 million in stock to reacquire the rights to diagnostic tests for two sexually transmitted diseases. The Gaithersburg company said that getting back the rights to its chlamydia and gonorrhea tests eventually will allow it to "bundle" them with its HPV test for cervical cancer. The move ultimately may increase both revenue for the company and convenience for women, allowing all three tests to be run from one patient sample.
BUSINESS
By Mara H. Gottfried and Mara H. Gottfried,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 15, 2000
Gaithersburg-based Digene Corp. said yesterday that it has come to an agreement with Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings to use its HPV test, which helps detect cervical cancer in women. Vandana K. Bapna, a biotechnology analyst at Hunt Valley-based Offutt Securities, called the deal significant for Digene, a biotechnology company that focuses on DNA and RNA technology for the detection, screening and monitoring of sexually transmitted diseases. "LabCorp is one of the largest reference testing labs in the United States," Bapna said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.