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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 29, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The final report of a presidential commission studying U.S. intelligence failures regarding illicit weapons includes a searing critique of how the CIA and other agencies never properly assessed Saddam Hussein's political maneuverings or the possibility that he no longer had weapon stockpiles, according to officials who have seen the report's executive summary. The report also proposes broad changes in the sharing of information among intelligence agencies that go well beyond the legislation passed by Congress late last year creating a director of national intelligence to coordinate action among all 15 U.S. intelligence agencies.
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NEWS
By SIOBHAN GORMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2005
WASHINGTON -- A new spymaster will for the first time coordinate clandestine activities across all 15 U.S. intelligence agencies, a move aimed to address one of the key recommendations of a presidential commission on intelligence failures. The new chief -- known publicly only by his first name, "Jose," because he is still an undercover officer -- will head a new National Clandestine Service, responsible for running spy operations at the CIA and managing the spy activities of the other intelligence agencies.
NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Patrick J. McDonnell,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 21, 2003
TIKRIT, Iraq - To snare Saddam Hussein in his underground hide-out, U.S. commanders overcame a daunting foe - an age-old, nearly impenetrable tribal tradition that values loyalty above all else and is instinctively hostile to outsiders. In the entrenched, insular structure of Iraqi tribes, betrayal is not supposed to be an option. Yet that is exactly what happened, U.S. officials say. For months, Hussein - falling back, as always, on tribal allegiances in times of trouble - had stymied U.S. searchers.
NEWS
By SCOTT SHANE AND TOM BOWMAN and SCOTT SHANE AND TOM BOWMAN,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1995
After posing for photos, Chinese diplomats led guests through their new, $13 million embassy in Canberra, Australia, a dramatic pagoda-style building with a swimming pool, tennis courts, greenhouse and sweeping lake views.But the grand opening in August 1990 would have been ruined had the diplomats known everything about their elegant chancery.Thirty U.S. agents had worked for months to lace the concrete and drywall of every office with fiber-optic listening devices, their fine, glass threads undetectable in security sweeps.
NEWS
By Haviland Smith | July 1, 2010
The recent arrest of 10 Russian citizens in America on charges of espionage at first blush appears to be a typical Cold War scenario. But it clearly is not. Human intelligence operations are uniquely equipped to ascertain an enemy's intentions. During the Cold War, the Soviet Union ran extensive intelligence operations against the United States. They targeted just about any American they could, many of whom were insignificant employees of the U.S. Government and members of the armed forces.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 12, 2006
SAN FRANCISCO -- From the billions of documents that form the World Wide Web and the links that weave them together, computer scientists and a growing collection of startup companies are finding new ways to mine human intelligence. Their goal is to add a layer of meaning on top of the existing Web that would make it less of a catalog and more of a guide - and even provide the foundation for systems that can reason in a human fashion. That level of artificial intelligence, with machines doing the thinking instead of simply following commands, has eluded researchers for more than half a century.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 6, 2008
WASHINGTON -- CIA Director Michael V. Hayden said publicly for the first time yesterday that his agency had used the harsh interrogation technique known as "waterboarding" on three al-Qaida suspects, and he testified that depriving the agency of coercive methods would "increase the danger to America." In the most detailed public comments to date on a CIA program that had been shrouded in secrecy for years, Hayden said the agency had used simulated drowning to extract critical information from terrorism suspects in 2002 and 2003.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | December 14, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The House of Representatives voted yesterday to prevent the CIA from using waterboarding and other harsh interrogation methods that already are banned from use by the U.S. military. The bill, which would fund and set policies for U.S. intelligence agencies, passed 222-199. It now goes to the Senate, where it faces strong Republican opposition. Even if the Senate approves the bill, the White House said in a statement that the president's advisers recommend that he veto it. The White House objects to the interrogation provision and other sections that would increase congressional oversight.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 29, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez, the U.S. commander in Iraq, said yesterday that he needed better intelligence on enemy guerrilla activity, not more troops, to bring security to the war-torn country. Meanwhile, the British army reported that one of its soldiers was killed late Wednesday after an angry mob surrounded about 20 soldiers in the southern town of Ali al Sharqi and fired on them with rocket-propelled grenades and automatic weapons. Soldiers returned yesterday morning and arrested eight people believed to have been involved in the incident, said Lt. Cmdr.
NEWS
April 29, 1994
One of the trickiest dilemmas facing a government is how to deal with an intelligence traitor it has caught. He must be punished severely, yet he must also be persuaded to disclose what information he passed on. The first concern is not just retribution; other potential traitors must fear the consequences. But the second factor can be vital, for the penetrated intelligence agency needs to know which secrets it lost, to whom, and how. The government has tried to resolve that contradictory challenge in the case of Aldrich H. Ames, the most damaging double agent in U.S. history.
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