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By GREG MILLER and GREG MILLER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 13, 2005
WASHINGTON -- CIA Director Porter J. Goss will be placed in charge of human spying operations across all of the nation's intelligence agencies as part of a restructuring expected to be unveiled today, U.S. intelligence officials said. The change would solidify the CIA's long-standing role leading human intelligence collection efforts around the globe and give the agency greater control over spying operations conducted by the Pentagon and the FBI, officials said. A senior intelligence official said yesterday that the restructuring had been approved by the White House and was scheduled to be announced by John D. Negroponte, the national intelligence director.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
The Pentagon is creating a new intelligence service aimed at gathering information on terrorist networks, weapons of mass destruction and other emerging concerns, a senior defense official said Monday. The new Defense Clandestine Service will draw several hundred officers from the existing Defense Intelligence Agency, according to the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly about the classified program. The officers - some military, some civilian - will work alongside CIA counterparts in places such as Africa, whereal-Qaida has grown more active, and Asia, where Chinese military expansion and North Korean and Iranian weapons ambitions are drawing increasing U.S. concern.
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NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2005
Maryland leaders are confident that the National Security Agency and its thousands of workers will weather cutbacks in the budget for electronic information gathering under a new intelligence strategy that emphasizes human spying and domestic intelligence. A senior intelligence official Wednesday said unspecified cuts in high-tech agencies such as the NSA are likely under the strategy unveiled by Director of National Intelligence John D. Negroponte. But state officials view any such cutbacks as a realignment of funds among the nation's intelligence agencies that won't drastically affect the local economy.
NEWS
By LAURA CADIZ and LAURA CADIZ,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2005
Maryland leaders are confident that the National Security Agency and its thousands of workers will weather cutbacks in the budget for electronic information gathering under a new intelligence strategy that emphasizes human spying and domestic intelligence. A senior intelligence official Wednesday said unspecified cuts in high-tech agencies such as the NSA are likely under the strategy unveiled by Director of National Intelligence John D. Negroponte. But state officials view any such cutbacks as a realignment of funds among the nation's intelligence agencies that won't drastically affect the local economy.
NEWS
By Bill Gertz | September 15, 2002
WASHINGTON -- The key failure of U.S. intelligence before Sept. 11 was the lack of human intelligence -- spies on the ground who could have learned the plans and intentions of al-Qaida before it attacked. The intelligence bureaucracy that was formed after Pearl Harbor to prevent another surprise attack is focused too much on electronic spying through communications intercepts and satellite photography. Spying on terrorist groups was farmed out to friendly foreign intelligence services, whose interests may not always coincide with U.S. interests.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 29, 1997
SPEAKING FOR humanity, I am disturbed about Deep Blue.As you know if you read the newspapers, "Deep Blue" is a 1972 movie about a woman with an amazing ability to...Whoops! My mistake! I meant to say that Deep Blue is an IBM computer that recently defeated the world heavyweight chess champion, Garry "Lobes of Steel" Kasparov, causing serious chess fans everywhere to pick angrily at the tape holding their eyeglasses together.It wasn't just that Kasparov lost; it was the pathetic way he lost.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 9, 2004
At one of his increasingly common public appearances earlier this year, Lt. Gen. Michael V. Hayden, head of the National Security Agency, described the ideal class of recruits for his secretive electronic spying operation. They might have long hair and rumpled clothes, he said, maybe even an awkward, slide-rule and pocket-protector manner. But they would have the brainpower to set the room on fire. "We don't hire them for their social skills, or how they dress," Hayden told business leaders.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - Though the White House announced its intelligence overhaul Wednesday with promises that it would make the country safer, the changes it outlined could take a decade to complete, according to longtime intelligence analysts, including a member of the presidential commission that proposed the reforms. "The whole process will take five to 10 years," said Adm. William O. Studeman, a member of the commission that investigated the intelligence failures that led the administration to conclude that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - The CIA has ignored its core mission of spying, has refused to take corrective action and is heading "over a proverbial cliff" after years of poor planning and mismanagement, the Republican-led House intelligence committee has concluded in the latest congressional broadside aimed at America's premier intelligence agency. A report that accompanies the committee's proposed intelligence authorization bill, which was approved by the full House in a 360-61 vote last night, paints a devastating picture of the CIA division that sends clandestine agents overseas, recruits foreign spies, steals secrets and provides covert commandos for the war on terrorism.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | April 23, 2012
The Pentagon is creating a new intelligence service aimed at gathering information on terrorist networks, weapons of mass destruction and other emerging concerns, a senior defense official said Monday. The new Defense Clandestine Service will draw several hundred officers from the existing Defense Intelligence Agency, according to the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak publicly about the classified program. The officers - some military, some civilian - will work alongside CIA counterparts in places such as Africa, whereal-Qaida has grown more active, and Asia, where Chinese military expansion and North Korean and Iranian weapons ambitions are drawing increasing U.S. concern.
NEWS
By GREG MILLER and GREG MILLER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 13, 2005
WASHINGTON -- CIA Director Porter J. Goss will be placed in charge of human spying operations across all of the nation's intelligence agencies as part of a restructuring expected to be unveiled today, U.S. intelligence officials said. The change would solidify the CIA's long-standing role leading human intelligence collection efforts around the globe and give the agency greater control over spying operations conducted by the Pentagon and the FBI, officials said. A senior intelligence official said yesterday that the restructuring had been approved by the White House and was scheduled to be announced by John D. Negroponte, the national intelligence director.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 17, 2005
BEIJING - The defection of a senior Chinese diplomat in Australia who claims he helped oversee a vast spy network has cast a spotlight on China's espionage activities at a time of increased global trade tensions and concern over Beijing's military spending. Chen Yonglin, the first secretary of the Chinese Consulate General in Sydney, chose a particularly embarrassing moment to go public against his employer - a rally last month in Australia marking the 16th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators.
NEWS
By Siobhan Gorman and Siobhan Gorman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - Though the White House announced its intelligence overhaul Wednesday with promises that it would make the country safer, the changes it outlined could take a decade to complete, according to longtime intelligence analysts, including a member of the presidential commission that proposed the reforms. "The whole process will take five to 10 years," said Adm. William O. Studeman, a member of the commission that investigated the intelligence failures that led the administration to conclude that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction.
NEWS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 9, 2004
At one of his increasingly common public appearances earlier this year, Lt. Gen. Michael V. Hayden, head of the National Security Agency, described the ideal class of recruits for his secretive electronic spying operation. They might have long hair and rumpled clothes, he said, maybe even an awkward, slide-rule and pocket-protector manner. But they would have the brainpower to set the room on fire. "We don't hire them for their social skills, or how they dress," Hayden told business leaders.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 24, 2004
WASHINGTON - The CIA has ignored its core mission of spying, has refused to take corrective action and is heading "over a proverbial cliff" after years of poor planning and mismanagement, the Republican-led House intelligence committee has concluded in the latest congressional broadside aimed at America's premier intelligence agency. A report that accompanies the committee's proposed intelligence authorization bill, which was approved by the full House in a 360-61 vote last night, paints a devastating picture of the CIA division that sends clandestine agents overseas, recruits foreign spies, steals secrets and provides covert commandos for the war on terrorism.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - All the troubles and challenges of the war in Iraq converged last fall on a warren of tight, windowless cells of the notorious Abu Ghraib prison. American commanders in Iraq pressured military intelligence officials to squeeze Iraqi detainees at the prison outside Baghdad for valuable "actionable intelligence" that might quell the rising and deadly insurgency in the country. Among those guarding these detainees on the prison's cell blocks were Army Reserve troops from Maryland, many trained in military police duties, but not as jailers.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - U.S. efforts to combat terrorism will continue to be plagued with weaknesses until policymakers reshape an intelligence bureaucracy based on an outdated Cold War model, a congressional inquiry concluded in a report issued yesterday. Capping a six-month joint investigation, the House and Senate intelligence committees said the CIA, FBI and other agencies missed a number of opportunities that could have disrupted the Sept. 11 terrorist plot. The lawmakers blamed poor communication, human failings, and unwillingness to share intelligence across agency lines or grasp the significance of clues.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 18, 2002
WASHINGTON - The nation's spy agencies failed to provide adequate warning of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks due partly to a series of "questionable management decisions" about where to spend money and assign workers, according to a sharply worded congressional report released yesterday. The Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency must do more to penetrate al-Qaida and other terrorist organizations, said the report by the House Intelligence Subcommittee on Terrorism and Homeland Security.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 15, 2004
WASHINGTON - U.S. intelligence agencies, blinded by bureaucratic inertia, money shortages and the lack of an overarching strategy, repeatedly missed warning signs of the al-Qaida threat before Sept. 11 and were unprepared to counter it, the staff of the Sept. 11 commission said in a report yesterday. The report, one of two blistering assessments released yesterday, found that the CIA under George J. Tenet failed to share pertinent information with other agencies and created a culture averse to "admitting errors and improving procedures."
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | February 9, 2003
WASHINGTON - Secretary of State Colin L. Powell's statement to the U.N. Security Council was a compelling case for intensifying international inspection, but not war. There is no question that the Iraqis are in material breach of more than a dozen U.N. resolutions, including Resolution 1441, and that they husband stockpiles of biological and chemical weapons. But it is also true that Mr. Hussein is in no position to further develop, let alone deploy, these weapons so long as international monitoring and U.S.-British military forces remain active.
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