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By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 2, 1997
You can say what you want about us newspaper journalists. You can say that we are atheistic, liberal, family-hating, snake-worshiping, Communist perverts. You can say that we dress like the character Ratso in the 1969 movie "Midnight Cowboy" and apparently have our hair styled by angry wrens. But the one thing you CAN'T say about us is that we don't admit our mistakes.Yes, we have made some doozies. Everyone remembers the famous 1948 picture of Harry Truman holding up a copy of the Chicago Tribune with a huge front-page headline declaring DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN.
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By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | January 3, 2006
The walls in Robert Fischell's home office in Howard County are filled with framed patents from home and abroad, a testament to a man whose mind is up and running in the wee-morning hours conceiving lifesaving medical devices. The 76-year-old inventor opens a briefcase atop his desk and displays some of his latest handiwork, devices he says will do more for modern medicine than his previous breakthroughs. Yet what could be greater than the first implantable insulin pump, the rechargeable pacemaker and flexible stents for coronary arteries?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | May 14, 1993
"Map of the Human Heart" is certainly one of a kind: it's a coming-of-age story about an Eskimo bombardier.This is not a small movie. I was astounded at the scale and detail, the energy that director Vincent Ward lavishes on the tale and how close he comes to bringing it off. But in the end what destroys, or at least diminishes "Map of the Human Heart" isn't its audacious originality, which turns out to be but a patina, but its utter familiarity -- the way in which it defaults to formula and is unable to discover fresh emotions while indulging in dreary stereotypes.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2004
In the hospital of the future, doctors may harvest stem cells from an ailing patient's heart, grow 10 million or so in a dish and return them to the heart to regenerate dead muscle. Yesterday, doctors from the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions talked glowingly about how revolutionary therapies like this will be delivered in a Heart Institute scheduled to open in 2008. And they had reason to glow. Against the purple backdrop of M&T Bank Stadium, hospital officials thanked former Ravens owner Art Modell for agreeing to head the governing board of the Johns Hopkins Heart Institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 2, 2003
Any Human Heart, by William Boyd (Knopf, 496 pages, $26) is the sort of rare novel that redeems the essential purpose of prose fiction - rising majestic above the vast fields of books, ranging from trash to near-art, disgorged from binderies year after year. It is a book that looks with confidence and yet unflinching awe at the circumstance of a human life -- of the meaning, if it is not absurd to say there is one, of life itself. It is presented entirely as the sporadic personal journal of Logan Mountstuart, born in 1906 in Uruguay, to an Englishman in business and a Uruguayan mother.
NEWS
January 15, 1993
Artificial heart:Artificial heart: Sharoyn Loughran, an Arizona woman who Monday became the nation's first artificial heart recipient in nearly two years, was taken off a respirator yesterday and listed in critical but stable condition.Ms. Loughran, 46, was awake but weak and was awaiting a human heart at the University of Arizona Medical Center, a hospital spokesman said. Her CardioWest air-driven heart was functioning properly.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
If human beings did not remember, we would not need to forgive. We could simply forget.If we had God-like knowledge of the heart of another, we would not need to forgive. We could simply understand.Forgiveness is the salve for the wounds of unjust injury, but most people find it difficult to apply, settling instead for the bittersweet pain of their righteous anger.Lives are ruined because people remember the past and cannot or do not forgive. Nations war,lovers murder, families are broken, friendships are lost.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2004
In the hospital of the future, doctors may harvest stem cells from an ailing patient's heart, grow 10 million or so in a dish and return them to the heart to regenerate dead muscle. Yesterday, doctors from the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions talked glowingly about how revolutionary therapies like this will be delivered in a Heart Institute scheduled to open in 2008. And they had reason to glow. Against the purple backdrop of M&T Bank Stadium, hospital officials thanked former Ravens owner Art Modell for agreeing to head the governing board of the Johns Hopkins Heart Institute.
NEWS
By Richard A. Knox and Richard A. Knox,Boston Globe | May 14, 2000
Designing an artificial heart seems like a straightforward engineering problem. The heart, after all, is not a space shuttle. It has just one job to do: pump blood. But the agonizing early-1980s experiences of the first few people to have their failing hearts replaced by machines showed that it was anything but straightforward. The first artificial heart recipient, Utah dentist Barney Clark, died after 112 miserable days on a heart pump powered by a bedside box the size of a washing machine.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | June 7, 1994
Kids are the consumers in the classroom. If we surveyed them about education the way we survey grown-ups about cars and soap powders, our schools might be a better product.But we don't. Daily we ask them, "How was school?" But we are satisfied with their monosyllabic answers or we tune out their complaints.Do we really want to know what they think of their school, their teachers? Do we really want to know what they learned at school today?Dianne Rogers did. The reading resource teacher at Germantown Elementary School in Annapolis surveyed a group of fourth-graders for their advice to teachers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | February 2, 2003
Any Human Heart, by William Boyd (Knopf, 496 pages, $26) is the sort of rare novel that redeems the essential purpose of prose fiction - rising majestic above the vast fields of books, ranging from trash to near-art, disgorged from binderies year after year. It is a book that looks with confidence and yet unflinching awe at the circumstance of a human life -- of the meaning, if it is not absurd to say there is one, of life itself. It is presented entirely as the sporadic personal journal of Logan Mountstuart, born in 1906 in Uruguay, to an Englishman in business and a Uruguayan mother.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | June 11, 2000
ON THE DAY they opened the doors of the brand-new Oriole Park at Camden Yards, John Steadman had a plan. He hired a man with a small airplane to fly over the first Opening Day crowd. The plane would trail a banner behind it. The banner would declare, "The Babe Says Hi." The idea was scratched by the U.S. Secret Service. The president of the United States was attending that day, so no planes were allowed over the ballpark. But the notion was vintage Steadman. Babe Ruth grew up here. He lived on a street that was now short center field.
NEWS
By Richard A. Knox and Richard A. Knox,Boston Globe | May 14, 2000
Designing an artificial heart seems like a straightforward engineering problem. The heart, after all, is not a space shuttle. It has just one job to do: pump blood. But the agonizing early-1980s experiences of the first few people to have their failing hearts replaced by machines showed that it was anything but straightforward. The first artificial heart recipient, Utah dentist Barney Clark, died after 112 miserable days on a heart pump powered by a bedside box the size of a washing machine.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | September 14, 1997
I am an angler. When circumstance allows, I go to wild, unspoilt, tumbling streams and as deftly as I can manage put tiny imitations of insects on the water's surface in hope of enchanting trout - almost invariably then to release them gently back to the water. I cannot explain the lapse, but in a lifetime of this fancy, I had never read the Bible, which for trout fishers is Izaak Walton's "The Compleat Angler."Is there a book whose title has been more often tap-danced upon? The antique spelling of "complete" has become a pilfered trademark word for thousands of books and articles by people who could not, in broad daylight, tell a trout from a 1949 Studebaker.
FEATURES
By DAVE BARRY and DAVE BARRY,Knight-Ridder News Service | March 2, 1997
You can say what you want about us newspaper journalists. You can say that we are atheistic, liberal, family-hating, snake-worshiping, Communist perverts. You can say that we dress like the character Ratso in the 1969 movie "Midnight Cowboy" and apparently have our hair styled by angry wrens. But the one thing you CAN'T say about us is that we don't admit our mistakes.Yes, we have made some doozies. Everyone remembers the famous 1948 picture of Harry Truman holding up a copy of the Chicago Tribune with a huge front-page headline declaring DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1996
If human beings did not remember, we would not need to forgive. We could simply forget.If we had God-like knowledge of the heart of another, we would not need to forgive. We could simply understand.Forgiveness is the salve for the wounds of unjust injury, but most people find it difficult to apply, settling instead for the bittersweet pain of their righteous anger.Lives are ruined because people remember the past and cannot or do not forgive. Nations war,lovers murder, families are broken, friendships are lost.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | June 17, 1995
This year marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of William Grant Still, the pioneering black symphonist. Still, who died in 1978, has been called ''the dean of Negro composers,'' and for many years his was the only black voice to be heard in the world of ''serious'' classical music.Earlier this month the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra performed Still's ''Archaic Ritual'' (1946), a musical evocation of an ancient religious ceremony. His best known work is ''Afro-American Symphony'' (1930)
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | June 11, 2000
ON THE DAY they opened the doors of the brand-new Oriole Park at Camden Yards, John Steadman had a plan. He hired a man with a small airplane to fly over the first Opening Day crowd. The plane would trail a banner behind it. The banner would declare, "The Babe Says Hi." The idea was scratched by the U.S. Secret Service. The president of the United States was attending that day, so no planes were allowed over the ballpark. But the notion was vintage Steadman. Babe Ruth grew up here. He lived on a street that was now short center field.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | June 17, 1995
This year marks the 100th anniversary of the birth of William Grant Still, the pioneering black symphonist. Still, who died in 1978, has been called ''the dean of Negro composers,'' and for many years his was the only black voice to be heard in the world of ''serious'' classical music.Earlier this month the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra performed Still's ''Archaic Ritual'' (1946), a musical evocation of an ancient religious ceremony. His best known work is ''Afro-American Symphony'' (1930)
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | June 7, 1994
Kids are the consumers in the classroom. If we surveyed them about education the way we survey grown-ups about cars and soap powders, our schools might be a better product.But we don't. Daily we ask them, "How was school?" But we are satisfied with their monosyllabic answers or we tune out their complaints.Do we really want to know what they think of their school, their teachers? Do we really want to know what they learned at school today?Dianne Rogers did. The reading resource teacher at Germantown Elementary School in Annapolis surveyed a group of fourth-graders for their advice to teachers.
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